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Dewalt Chainsaw - 40V vs. 60V

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I'm invested in both 40V and 60V platforms.  Is there a difference between the two battery chainsaws?  I know they operate at different voltages (duh), but voltage doesn't equate to power; watts do. Are there subtle differences between the two units that are not advertised?

 

https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/outdoor-power-equipment/40v-max-xr-16-cordless-chainsaw-bare/dccs690b

https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/outdoor-power-equipment/flexvolt-60v-max-cordless-chainsaw-tool-only/dccs670b

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I've never looked at the specs of these two products but the reviews show the 54v model throwing chains because of a cheap tensioning system.

 

If the power of the two are rated the same,  I'd go with flexvolt because theoretically the motor and internals are not working as hard, or should I say, being pushed as hard. An 18v platform requires higher amps (more heat and stress on the tool and battery) to output the same amount of power. You might see a benefit from newer batteries with larger, higher current drawing cells with the flexvolt line. I'm not sure what cells are in the latest 18v dewalt tools though as I do not own any 18v batteries.

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You can get same power as the higher voltage tools with lower voltage tools but they work harder. 18v tools are less efficient under load than higher voltage tools. More heat and more of the battery drained. Your 40v tools in theory should be less efficient than the 60v tools. I think the difference between the 40v chainsaw and the 60v chainsaw would be a bit of a wash but I could be wrong.

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All I know is 40v is Geared towards the Professional Landscaper

 

And FLEXVOLT to the Professional Tradesmen 

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AvE totally killed the Flexvolt chainsaw in his YouTube review. Kind of a bummer, as I was stoked to pick one up myself. Method is correct the chain tensioner is bunk and makes the saw shite. 

 

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We had a stihl chainsaw with a similar tensioning system years ago and it was in constant need of adjusting. I think it's just a poor design regardless of manufacturer. I recall seeing this on some stihl models only recently also!

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True, at the same power draw, lower voltage tools will draw more current, after all P=VA or A=P/V. Higher current = more heat, I don't believe however the difference in current draw between 40v and 60v line up will make any noticeable difference in tool's life. One noticeable difference between the two is the battery run time. 40v battery is about double the size of a 60v battery, it packs more juice (W/hr) giving your tool a longer run time. I've also never read anything negative on 40v chainsaw, considering I didn't read a lot because I wasn't interested in getting into a 40v line up, just for the sake of comparison with a 60v version. And the reviews on 60v were a very mixed bunch, either very negative (bad chain tensioner, heavy oil consumption), or very positive. Many of the reviewers mentioned heavy oil consumption, but not all of them seen it as a negative.

In the end I've decided to postpone switching to an electric chainsaw and gave my stihl a proper tuning it deserved. 🙂

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I guess the only runtime clue I have is that I've used 1/2 gallon of chain oil with my flexvolt saw. It does what I need it to do. 

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40v and 60v both having almost the same configuration and best in performing, both own a brand value of Dewalt which is reliable and provide ease of work 40v have specification like which is quite similar to 60v chainsaw

  • The 40V Lithium-particle battery is tradable with all Greenworks 40V items 
  • 16" Oregon Bar and Chain slices up to 28" logs source
  • Brushless engine conveys up to 30% more torque for more prominent cutting execution 
  • Brushless engine configuration offers up to 70% less vibration for client comfort while working 
  • Chain brake and low kickback chain for expanded client security 
  • The electric engine kicks you off inside seconds and disposes of the issue of gas draw lines and risky exhaust 
  • Apparatus less chain tensioning for speedy modifications so you can return to the main job

40V Chainsaw_Hero_alt4_tool_only.png

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Quote

just  to be sure I read right

the dewalt 40vmax batteryis fully compatible with the greeworks 40v tools ??

 

2)arethe greenworks batteriescompatiblewith Dewalt 40max tools ?

 

==>The 40V Lithium-particle battery is tradable with all Greenworks 40V items 

 

if so,doesdewaltown greenworks ?

or did greenworks license the battery system ?

chargers compatible ?

 

 

cheers

 

 

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On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 1:50 AM, BigJack said:

I'm invested in both 40V and 60V platforms.  Is there a difference between the two battery chainsaws?  I know they operate at different voltages (duh), but voltage doesn't equate to power; watts do. Are there subtle differences between the two units that are not advertised?

 

https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/outdoor-power-equipment/40v-max-xr-16-cordless-chainsaw-bare/dccs690b

https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/outdoor-power-equipment/flexvolt-60v-max-cordless-chainsaw-tool-only/dccs670b

Not to be pedantic, but all things being equal voltage does correlate to power.

 

P = IV = I^2*R = V^2/R

 

Where:

P=Power

I= Current

V= Voltage

R= Resistance

 

Assuming the resistance stays about the same between the 40V and 60V units, 

 

P(60)=(60^2)/R

P(40)=(40^2)/R

 

P(60)/P(40)= [(60^2)/R]/[(40^2)/R]=3,600/1,600=

or 2.25x's as much power in a 60V vs a 40V, assuming all else is equal.

 

(someone correct me if the rust on my old engineering degree has screwed something up.  But I think this is correct)

 

Now if we want to identify work done, it would be:

 

W= P*t

 

W=Work 

P= Power

t=time

 

 

Personally I like the backwards compatibility of the flexvolt and plan on sticking with either 20v or 60V tools.

 

 

 

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Your assumption of fixed resistance is off because you have to factor in series resistance which if all cells are the same internal resistance, 60 V means 33% more series resistance so the current decreases by that amount, leaving you with roughly similar performance. Then there's the issue of voltage drop proportional to square of current so you can quickly see why something as simple as P=VI is not simple at all. Hence Milwaukee for instance has stayed with 18 V batteries where Dewalt goes up to 56 on a FlexVolt but hasn't so far had a vastly superior advantage, never mind say Kobalt 24 V. Then we can really confuse things when you realize brushless commutation means the rotors are DC with an AC rectifier feeding them and often synchronous so the fields are actually AC. A DC to AC converter as well as DC to DC can easily increase or decrease the voltage in the process so motor voltage is independent of battery voltage and hence the higher voltages play off losses in the wiring (IxIxR) against increased battery series resistance. Hence no easy relationships where voltage is definitive.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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31 minutes ago, paulengr said:

Your assumption of fixed resistance is off because you have to factor in series resistance which if all cells are the same internal resistance, 60 V means 33% more series resistance so the current decreases by that amount, leaving you with roughly similar performance. Then there's the issue of voltage drop proportional to square of current so you can quickly see why something as simple as P=VI is not simple at all. Hence Milwaukee for instance has stayed with 18 V batteries where Dewalt goes up to 56 on a FlexVolt but hasn't so far had a vastly superior advantage, never mind say Kobalt 24 V. Then we can really confuse things when you realize brushless commutation means the rotors are DC with an AC rectifier feeding them and often synchronous so the fields are actually AC. A DC to AC converter as well as DC to DC can easily increase or decrease the voltage in the process so motor voltage is independent of battery voltage and hence the higher voltages play off losses in the wiring (IxIxR) against increased battery series resistance. Hence no easy relationships where voltage is definitive.

Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
 

The voltage would be measured at the tool, I doubt the resistance between two chain saws would be all that much.  the internal resistance to the battery wouldnt have much impact because you are delivering double the voltage hence square of the power.  There would be very little to no voltage drop within the battery, because there just isn't going to be much resistance between cells, regardless of rather they are in series or not. 
The mount of work you care about would be at the output of the tool, not within the battery.  (BTW, it would take more resistance to wire up something in parallel vs something in series all things being equal.)

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so back to the question Are DeWALT 40v tools and Greenworks 40v batteries compatible? Could also ask are Greenworks 40v tools compatible with DeWALT 40v batteries?

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On 6/15/2019 at 7:17 PM, Jronman said:

so back to the question Are DeWALT 40v tools and Greenworks 40v batteries compatible? Could also ask are Greenworks 40v tools compatible with DeWALT 40v batteries?

 

I'd be interested to know the definitive answer too but I am 98% sure that it is not the case. He probably just copied the description text of the greenworks 40v chainsaw.

 

Greenworks 82/80/60/40/24 batteries have a lot of clones (kobalt, powerworks, cramer, briggs and stratton, stiga, masport, victa), all manufactured by Globe tools group. Despite looking exactly the same, sharing the same design and coming from the same factory, they are not compatible among brands. Well that's not entirely true, In fact they are, but you can't insert a Kobalt battery in a Greenworks tool and vice versa unless you start grinding the guiding rails. 

If even blatant clones are designed to be incompatible, I would not expect any out-of-the-box compatibility between Greenworks and Dewalt.

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I'm very pleased with the Flexvolt chainsaw, put it through its paces on a recent camping trip.
The chain did come off once, but as luck would have it it only came off after I finished a cut/stopped using it, after that the tension kept up.

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Workshop addict reviewed both versions of the chainsaw and noted that the 40V version has more power than the 60V.  I went ahead and picked up the 40V since that's what I'm already using with my existing outdoor power equipment.  I'm totally happy with it.

 

 

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