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PocketsRN

Miter saw keeps tripping breaker

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I just finished a new house, and have been working on getting my garage workshop organized.  Today I got my new miter saw set up and ready to go, but every time I pull the trigger it immediately trips the breaker.  Only thing i can think is the 15 amp saw is overloading the 15 amp circuit BUT... I ran my 15 amp table saw a few days ago, without a problem, and I never had a problem running it at the old house, which had the same standard 15 amp setup.  What am I missing here?

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Welcome to the forum.

 

Is the problematic breaker GFCI or regular thermal/magnetic?

 

If GFCI, the inductive motor load presents a phase (time) difference between voltage and current that could exceed the trip threshold.

 

In either case, breakers can go bad, but not typical on a new house. Is retaining the house wiring, but swapping two usage of a physically different but equivalent breaker in the panel an option? If so, please report on the results.

 

Use all appropriate safety procedures and qualified personnel when working on electrical systems.

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It is gfci, and swapping it out might be an option.  My builder's site manager is supposed to be out in the next couple of days to check out a couple things, gonna have him look at it. 

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There are some of my motorized tools that are always problematic on GFCI breakers, on different breakers, even after the breaker is swapped to a new breaker. 

 

The issue is the inductive load. 

 

One option that may work differently is to use a GFCI breaker in the circuit panel, instead of a GFCI receptacle at the first location in the string of receptacles. This option maintains the ground fault protection required for building codes, but could be more tolerant of the inductive load.

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Actually, I'm pretty sure that's how they have it set up, because none of the outlets have the gfi switches, they're just plain ole regular outlets.

 

I had my dad come over and take a look at it today, and he said everything seemed ok with the circuitry and whatnot, and when he tried the saw, it tripped a couple times, but then worked fine.  

Probably just me and technology not getting along again...

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17 hours ago, PocketsRN said:

Actually, I'm pretty sure that's how they have it set up, because none of the outlets have the gfi switches, they're just plain ole regular outlets.

It sounds like the regular 15A thermal / magnetic panel breakers are tripping when using the saw, with zero GFCI protection in the garage.

 

My understanding is that GFCI receptacle protection is required in areas where water shock is possible, like: kitchen; bathroom; garage; basement and outside. It is surprising to me that new construction would be built without that protection.

 

On every house I've wired, I always run 20A circuits w/ 12AWG wire for the receptacles. I also put lighting on different circuits than receptacles so visual light dimming doesn't happen when high-draw receptacle loads are turned on.

 

An ammeter with peak current hold could be used to measure the current drawn by the saw, to determine if the saw is problematic.

 

The OP's garage workshop would be significantly improved if additional 20A receptacle circuits were added. Those new 20A receptacles could be used for this saw, plus other high-draw tools.

 

When I did my shop, linked below, the receptacles on each wall, plus the bench strip, was on it's own 20A circuit breaker.

 


http://forum.toolsinaction.com/topic/14373-wingless-basement-workshop/
 

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