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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/24/2021 in Posts

  1. (DWS5031) DEWALT Router TrackSaw Guide Adapter uses the included adapter that is marked for 690 & 890 series routers. Adapter kit works with multiple brands of routers and tracks.
    2 points
  2. Most of the time I will go cordless if I can. I don't have many corded tools. Mostly a few specialty tools from Festool. I currently have batteries from Ego, DeWALT, Milwaukee, and Festool. Many on this forum will likely have multiple battery platforms as well. There are advantages and disadvantages with having one or multiple battery platforms
    2 points
  3. This is the only photo I can find online, which indicated it's for additional leverage, as well...
    1 point
  4. Looking for suggestions for soldering iron, solder sucker, wicks, helping hands, magnifiers and other essential tools to do ECU work on my Miata. Many many years back I was a skilled EE circuit designer, making my own boards etc. HOWEVER that was over 40 years ago and the world changed a lot since then. Not looking to overbuy as I am a skilled enough solderer and can keep my tips clean, but need guidance as to the newer tools which have changed so much.Decided a kit ECU (brand to be decided) was a great way to reintroduce myself to the current electronics universe and have fun with my 94 Miata at the same time. Thanks for your help! Wall Lenk Soldering Guns
    1 point
  5. Sounds like the electronics in the drill have gotten buggered in such a way that their communication with the battery doesn’t do anything but tell the battery it’s dead when it most definitely is not. Maybe it’s something that will eventually magically reset itself, I can’t think of a way off the top of my head how to glitch it back into shape. These things don’t exactly come with reboot features. Just wondering but these don’t happen to be “aftermarket” batteries are they?
    1 point
  6. Just sent the link to this discussion to the Assistant Service Operations Manager at DeWalt. He's going to research it and get back to me.
    1 point
  7. Gotta brag. We have been inundated with rain for the last couple of weeks and mowing has become a task to get done between storms. I recently mowed two 10,000 sq.ft. lawns and the 16,000 sq.ft. lot next door on a single charge. Total run time was 2.3 hours and I mowed until the deck motors shutdown. When I got back to the charger, the BLM was at one red bar, 9% available, and 42.2 volts. Beginning voltage was 51.5 volts. Also, since the hour meter has been 7% understated, the actual run time was 2.5 hours. Not bad for a 35 month old mower with 97 hours of run time and 195 charge cycles that is supposed to run for up to 2 hours. The recharge consumed 4,050 watts, which cost me $0.53 in electricity and took 9 hours to complete.
    1 point
  8. This is a ratcheting driver but, it is more than that. The pin was not fixed, coming loose over the years. The pin was designed to come out and the pin was designed to be placed perpendicularly in the handle. It is not just part of the packaging. DeWalt didn't randomly put a removable pin in the handle for no reason. The question is why. I agree the pin is an odd shape if the intent was for it to be used as a T handle to apply more torque. It occurred to me that I've got a bore scope that may fit in the hole. Hopefully, I'll be able to see if there is something internally the pin does when struck. I'll also see if striking causes any rotation. I'll post any findings in a few days. Thanks!
    1 point
  9. Hello my friends! If you are a TIG welder you must have this tool! As TIG welders we are sometimes required to weld very small parts, it will not always be simple... but pay attention! With the tool you see me building in the video, you will not believe how easy it becomes. Say hello to the "Third Hand"
    1 point
  10. Just noticed that both of these kits are on sale (the Kobalt is a New Lower Price, but Lowe's is infamous for bouncing them back up to full retail): Metabo HPT 5-tool kit for $399 (includes 36v Multivolt circular saw, everything else is 18v brushless): Metabo HPT (was Hitachi Power Tools) 5 Tool Cordless Combo Kit in the Power Tool Combo Kits department at Lowes.com Kobalt XTR 5-tool kit for $349: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Kobalt-XTR-5-Tool-24-Volt-Max-Brushless-Power-Tool-Combo-Kit-with-Hard-Case-Charger-Included-and-2-Batteries-Included/1002274180 Thoughts on either, and/or suggestions on which you'd recommend?
    1 point
  11. The nail fits both ways. Both holes feel like they are fitted with nylon bushings to keep the pin secure while making it easy to put in and take out. The handle end has a steel collar where the pin goes in suggesting it's designed to be struck (but why?). Any standard hex bit should fit in the bit end. The tool is ~8 inches long and is over a pound. I called DeWalt. They made it but can't identify it without a model number and there are no numbers on the tool that I can find.
    1 point
  12. Welcome to the forum. Nice looking compressor. Good luck. What help is required? This Vintage Publication site may have useful information. They didn't have the manual for that compressor, but it may have more nice catalog pages.
    1 point
  13. tDoes anyone have an Owner’s Manual, or any information regarding this Sears Craftsman 2hp 20 gal 100 psi Twin Cylinder, portable horizontal air compressor? I recently purchased it from the original owner who’s wife bought it for him as a birthday gift in 1967. It’s model # is 106.173640 & the first mention of it I could find was in the 1972/1973 Sears Craftsman Power & Hand Tool catalog on page 111. It was listed there as being stock # 17364N (it’s model # minus the 3 digit manufacturer identifier). It was also listed again in the 1973 catalog on page 24 with the same item, or stock #, and again in the following year’s catalog 1974/1975 on page 33. I’ve enclosed a few photos for you to note the quite different labeling attached to it, as well as the fact that unlike other Sears Craftsman air compressors I’ve seen—this didn’t come with a Craftsman motor, it was equipped with a 2hp model 6K773AB 115/230 V Dayton capacitor start, compressor duty motor from the factory. I also included copies of the pages that featured it in the Sears Craftsman Power & Hand Tool catalogs that I earlier referenced. Any help at all regarding this wonderfully maintained vintage air compressor would be greatly appreciated. Thanks everyone! Bill
    1 point
  14. I've dealt with Milwaukee's warranty service once, for my 2763 high torque impact wrench. They repaired it (the trigger was faulty) and sent it back with a repair label on it. I can't attest to their battery replacement practices. I would like to think that you received a refurbished battery with new cells, but I agree that it looks bad when you send in a battery that looks nice and get one that's seen some use--even if only the housing. I will say that the one DeWalt battery I replaced under warranty was not even sent in. I contacted them and they sent a new battery after asking for the date code on the old one. I still have that one somewhere waiting to go in the recycle bin.
    1 point
  15. Welcome to the forum. Those Sheetrock wall anchors exist to help ensure stuff screwed to the wall remains. Usage of screws of any color has increased risk of it pulling away from the wall. Good luck.
    1 point
  16. It really is amazing how much tool technology advances from generation to generation. I found a fifty-ish year old wood shop textbook in the garage (and forgot to grab it...the house is being closed on right now) and looked through it briefly. The power tools in the pictures were all USA made, corded, and dangerous by today's standards. Twenty years ago I was a mechanic, relying on pneumatic tools and dragging an air hose everywhere. If I got back in that business now, I'd use cordless tools in lieu of air tools, with few exceptions. Like Jronman, I have multiple systems. Milwaukee (M12 and M18), DeWalt (8v, 12v, 20v, and FlexVolt), Ryobi One+, Ridgid 18v, MetaboHPT (18v and MultiVolt), Bosch 18v, and EGO. While there's a lot of overlap when it comes to basic tools (drills, impact drivers, and saws), each system has its pros and cons. Some of the pros, for example: FlexVolt batteries can be used with most 20v Max tools, the One+ system has been around for over 25 years and doesn't look like it's going anywhere (IMHO, this is a big reason why Ryobi is probably the best system for the casual tool user), MultiVolt allows a choice between corded or cordless (I just got the adapter a few weeks ago), and Milwaukee is, well, Milwaukee. While every brand constantly releases new and improved tools, Milwaukee seems to be the most aggressive, with their Fuel line on its second or third generation already. As for cons, MetaboHPT and Bosch are simply not very established in the US when compared to the likes of DeWalt and Milwaukee, Ryobi is stuck with its pod-style battery (while every other 18v-class brand has changed to slide-on packs), Ridgid is a Home Depot exclusive in the States (but identical to AEG abroad), and DeWalt's 12v Max system is only now trying to compete with Miilwaukee's M12 (despite being around nearly as long). Each system has its strengths and weaknesses, so it's easy to see the advantage of owning multiple systems, but the biggest con of owning multiple systems is just that--owning and maintaining different battery platforms. This is the reason I own at least a drill and some type of saw in each brand. Simply put, if I'm going to the junk yard and need to bring my M18 impact wrench, I like the option of throwing an M18 drill and recip saw in the box without having to grab my Ridgid or another brand. A key benefit to owning different platforms is the ability to buy the "best" tools for your needs. You might want a behemoth of a drill and go for the most powerful 18v model you can find, but find that you want a compact saw to go along with it. Also, some manufacturers only offer specialty tools in one voltage or the other, while most offer something the competition doesn't. Holiday sales are great for the average person, but I've amassed most of my tools by finding clearance deals. One of the latest was a MultiVolt hammer drill for around $50 (originally $200). If you have the time and patience, and especially if you have multiple Lowe's and Home Depot stores in your area of NC, you can score some great deals. I've had good luck with holiday special buys early in the year, usually with 50% savings from the holiday sale price. I've also lucked out when stores decide to stop carrying a particular tool (such as when the FlexVolt miter and tables saws were removed from some Home Depots) or a brand discontinues a product (most recently the Ridgid Octane line). Anyway, welcome to the forums and best of luck!
    1 point
  17. Can anyone tell me what the holes are in the front of the D26204 router? You can see them facing you in this photo. I thought at first they were just some sort of alternative holes for the fence, but they aren't. They are smaller diameter ( less than 8mm ) and also the screw holes above them ( presumably to secure the rods that fit in the holes ) are also not the normal DeWalt wing bolt size.
    1 point
  18. Tool Buying Guide.... Tools have been around for a very long time helping people everyday from just being there to show manhood to down right making a living. Everyone has to start somewhere, some people are lucky to have other people in their lives to help with this part of life by showing them the ropes. I'm going to go over a few things you should think about if you are ready to have tools be part of your everyday life for helping with self accomplishment or profit. There are many brand names available that tend to show off their flagship tools, with ads that tend to make the tougher jobs look simple, that is all well and fine if you have experience with tools but what if you don't. If you are ready to dip into the tool world and have very little to no experience here are a few things to think about. You can start out with basic hand tools like a hammer, tape measure, and a hand saw but now days we all want convenience as well..... so power tools are usually the way to go. Many brands offer corded power tools in pretty much every shape or form but taking a step further are cordless power tools. Now in saying that many brands have most all cordless power tools needed to do almost every tasks. Some manufactures cater to different area's of the work force, not all brands offer all kinds of tools in every field, think about what you might want to do with your new tools now and in the future. This is important because it can reflect on what brand to buy into. This without saying there is nothing wrong with buying into more than one brand or battery platform but you may want to do this in the future. There are also different power in tools mainly in the volts you see advertised. 12V and 18V/20V are the most common, most tool companies offer many tools in both power ratings. These tools are very different in size and power, the 12V options offer adequate power to handle most things with a compact size as well. The 18v/20v versions are usually the power houses of the line of tools offered. So the question is do I need one or the other or both, well this is where it can get tricky, the 18v/20v versions of the tools are not only larger and heavier but usually come with a larger price tag as well. Again it is not wrong to have or want both but if you are just starting out, the larger more powerful 18v/20v is usually the way to go to get started. Another thing is all the talk about brushed or brushless versions of tools, not all tools are equal not all brands offer all tools in both versions. The newer technology is the brushless tools and they usually come with a higher price. Is the brushless style needed? well not totally. They will however offer slightly more power and battery run time but that is not saying a brushed version is not good. If you are just starting out most times the best economical way to buy your tools are in combo kits, you will receive multiple tools that are mainly paired up with a drill/driver and an impact/driver, Note about impact drivers: Although most manufactures introduced the impact driver not all that long ago and deem the new tool to be the drivers of all drivers they don't play nice with every application. As impact drivers tend to pound or hammer when driving, an impact driver is still a great tool for many applications however for some delicate driving a regular drill will do a better job. Some of the larger kits will tent to include a reciprocating saw, circular saw along with a light of some kind. These kits generally come with 2 batteries ranging in power ratings of small compact 1.5 ah right up to 5.0ah batteries and a matching charger. You may think I'm never gonna need these extra tools that are included in the kit but when you add up the costs the more in the kit the cheaper the individual tools become, so in saying that once you do own them and you find you don't use them there is a good chances someone will purchase them from you to help offset the original cost. Do some research, think about what you will want to do, find a big box store that have these different brands on display so you can get a feel for the tools in your own hands, just like seeing a fancy sports car, it may look great but not always are they comfortable for everyone to drive. All different tool companies come with all different warranties for their tools, some are very different from one another some are better than others as well. This can reflect on what brand to buy into but it shouldn't. I am not going to go into what brand is best or what brand to try and avoid but I would stick to brand names that are known. I hope this helps by giving you something to think about before jumping into the tools world.....Good Luck!
    1 point
  19. Maybe the Universal Edge Guide with Dust Collection. It comes with multiple rod sizes.
    1 point
  20. German manufacturer AS Motor has announced a whole new range of landscaping machines based on the EGO 56v battery platform. https://www.as-motor.com/products/?electric=1&_ga=2.15768502.1851110912.1625292688-942542610.1625292688 Some of their equipment will be compatible with the 28ah backpack battery and feature the EGO Peak-power technology (2x56v). AS may not be that famous in the US but it's a highly regarded professional brand in Europe. They build indestructible mowers designed to perform in rough conditions (tall grass, uneven terrain, steep hills). This new system is expected to be available in 2022. AS previously released a couple of models featuring the Briggs and Stratton 82li motor (similar to Snapper) before switching to EGO batteries. Also one has to note that unlike Kobalt, Greenworks, Greenworks Commercial, Stiga, Powerworks, Menard and Snapper, there is no artificial trick to make the battery incompatible across brands.
    1 point
  21. Welcome aboard.
    1 point
  22. Yes, its crazy how much stuff has changed in the past 20 years. Will be even crazier 20 years from now. Glad to have you here.
    1 point
  23. Welcome to the forum
    1 point
  24. I encountered exactly the same problem, and I admit I was stumped. But rather than getting frustrated, I headed right for the internet, and BevelSwtich's comment above saved me some grief. Plus, now I know what that knob is for. Win!
    1 point
  25. That's crazy it is happening to so many people.
    1 point
  26. Lots of companies show that pad as out of stock or unavailable. That shows as available at Lowes, a huge home improvement store. Maybe they will ship down under.
    1 point
  27. For anyone interested, this tool is coming down under early next year, finally!!!!
    1 point
  28. So I bought this quite some time ago now and thought I'd share my thoughts on its use so far. First impressions were really good, I believe it works as intended and the remote with tool pairing works great also. Pros - Runtime with a 9ah or 12ah capacity battery is pretty good. If you begin with three fully charged batteries and two chargers you can literally run this tool non stop. - It is light when it isn't full of dust. - Portability is good - From memory it wasn't expensive - Auto filter cleaning works very well - It is relatively quiet This is where dewalt got it all wrong in my opinion. Cons - No wheels - The hose marks everything in black, walls, floors etc - Supplied hose length is useless, I had to buy the extra length hose - fleece bags destroy the performance of the tool - Alarm can't be disabled and the hose diameter selector switch has never made a difference for me - Auto filter cleaning should be optional - Metal latches should be on the upper half of the unit, when emptying the bin into a garbage bag they hook onto the bag and tear it open nearly all of the time. With all this in mind, it makes me wonder if dewalt actually give their tools out to real trades, in real work environments to test out during development, prior to release? I used this attached to my 9" grinder to grind approx 25sqm of concrete after removing tiles prior to pouring self levelling. With the fleece bags, it couldn't keep up with the dust (granted it is only rated for 5" tools) and the alarm would not stop. I removed the fleece bags and it was like a different vacuum, the suction power increased enormously. I would guess that the dust clogs the fleece bag almost instantly. No more alarm and the tool kept up quite well with the dust as I ground. I was amazed how well the filter cleaning worked. Some photos below. If you ever have issues with the audible alarm just remove the bags and it will solve your problem. I just bought the metabo ASR 36-18 and started using it, I will post a review on it soon. Size difference to the metabo
    1 point
  29. Welcome to the forum. This Vintage Tools Forum has Black and Decker documents, but that specific manual was not located. They might have something close enough. Post some pictures. Here is a topic w some images for that saw. My dinosaur miter saw is nothing fancy, but I have it set to make really accurate cuts from one side, entering from left, held w/ left hand, cutting w/ right hand. In my case the one piece fence isn't straight and I don't want to make it worse by putting in my bench press.
    1 point
  30. I believe the issue looks like a fault where the battery connects to the tool allowing it to vibrate ever so slightly during use. Regardless of heat protection the terminal should not melt unless the contact is poor. I use many tools continuously over and over until the battery drains and it should not melt. A line trimmer draws little current so the battery should barely get warm. Milwaukee have been the most disappointing in terms of battery quality for me over the last few years. Their batteries have been so bad that unless it's a specialised tool I can't buy from anyone else, I avoid Milwaukee now.
    1 point
  31. Agree, we didn't go this year and think it was way down. Stinks because it's always a great show.
    1 point
  32. I'd like to convert a regular sized refrigerator by cutting out the divide between the freezer and fridge compartments so that the whole thing maintains the same temp. Additionally, I'd I'd like to modify it so that it maintains between 50-60 deg F. Only problem is I don't know enough about how fridges work to know if it's possible. Anyone have advice on getting something like this done?
    1 point
  33. I have no idea but if you can figure it out, that would be awesome to see.
    1 point
  34. https://www.protoolreviews.com/tools/best-18v-impact-driver-head-to-head-review/43129/ I think this comparison is a bit more likely to be objectively trustworthy. Sure everyone could be paying people behind the curtains for any of these YouTube reviewers and certain performance tests can always be hand-picked to favor one product or another, but there are a decent number of hard measurements in here that are hard to argue with. For what it’s worth the Gen 3 finished number two behind the Makita but does have higher max power. Personally I think with impact drivers we’re moving past the days when max power should be the primary metric. Compact brushless motors have long since surpassed the mechanical limits of what’s sensible for the 1/4” hex format; if you need more use an impact wrench with appropriate size drive. They even say this exact thing at the end of this review. Buying 1/4” drives just to stick 1/2” adapters on that you keep breaking isn’t enhancing utility for anything.
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Buy a Dewalt, should clear your problem right up
    1 point
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