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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/24/2020 in Posts

  1. For those interested in adding a cutting guide using a LED or laser, i bought a flexible LED USB light (it has the same outline as a toothbrush) and a USB female to male extension cord and a small USB battery pack (on eBay) and then glued the setup to the top of the blade housing under the blade guard and it works perfectly creating a shadow where the blade will run across the wood. Overall cost was less than $25. I had previously tried a micro laser but mounting it in a good position is really difficult (I had to use Blutac to mount it under the rail housing) and the battery connection is not effective.
    3 points
  2. Welcome to the forum and the crew.
    3 points
  3. Thank you for your service. That is a crazy long history and something to be proud of. You have done more in your career than most people in this country and world have done in a lifetime, which says a lot on it's own. A lot of people like to talk the talk but you have walked the walk and I respect every aspect of that. It's people like you who have made my life easier and can never thank you enough.
    3 points
  4. Despite the subject, I'll try to leave politics out of this. If anyone feels a need to bring them up, please do so respectfully. Over the past few months I've been a fringe player in the recent Inauguration, working to ensure that key pieces melded together while staying out of the big picture and avoiding any direct exposure to the events themselves. This past week saw our schedule flipped as the team and I worked to bring all of the military elements together during a wholly unique transition of power in our Executive Branch of government. I had the honor of being a part of the Inaugural Parade and a bunch Inaugural events years ago, so I know the amount of time, effort, and (let's face it) shenanigans that go along with the formalities during a normal Inauguration. Let's just say that the downsized celebrations were welcome considering the pandemic and the violence that has taken place since last year. As we ramped up to 1200 on Wednesday, I wondered what-if anything-might happen. National Guardsmen were in DC in droves, and when I missed a turn going into work I got to drive past the heavily fortified Capitol (a uniform and proper ID worked wonders, and no, I have no insight as to the Guardsmen since I'm on Active status and there's this whole Posse Comitatus thing...). I was wondering what might transpire and was relieved to see that it was uneventful. I may be moving to yet another very unique assignment before retirement, but this career has already taken me to places I never fathomed as a young(er) FM2176 looking to simply join the Infantry and go to war. Sure, I've done the whole war thing, back when it was "fun" as we toppled Saddam's regime in 2003, but I've also helped young men and women to enlist, turned them from civilians into Infantry Soldiers, rendered final honors in Arlington National Cemetery, taken part in multiple national events, worked in higher headquarters in Afghanistan, and served in positions that enabled me to help victims or save Soldiers from their own dark thoughts. I've met Presidents, Medal of Honor recipients, Wounded Warriors, celebrities, and too many others to mention; not bad for a kid that grew up in a trailer park. As a proud Virginian with roots that go back some 400 years, as a Soldier who's carried on a tradition of service dating to the 1600's, and as an American, I hope this nation continues to endure even during the most trying times. Before long I'll fade away from federal service and plan to continue serving my community in a vocation that is more unpopular now than ever. In the meantime I'll keep up my tool addiction, create oddities as I get the inspiration, and maybe even hone my skills one of these days (ideally while keeping my digits and natural beauty 🤡). Anyway, back to the tools! America will always need tradesmen and builders!
    3 points
  5. Have a Merry Christmas and a Happy New year or whatever Holiday you celebrate.
    3 points
  6. @power to0ls here are some things I do to keep safe. I hope they help. If the material is 1-1/2" or less in width I would use a push stick. For material wider than that I rest my right pinky finger on the top of the fence to ensure my hand stays away from the blade. I don't like using push sticks for wider material. It increases the difficulty of getting an accurate cut. If you want to use a push block or a sled that should work just fine since they would have a wider surface to push with. Another tip is don't stand directly behind the piece you are cutting just incase kickback occurs. You wouldn't wan't a piece of wood traveling at high speed towards yourself. Always use the riving knife. This helps prevent kickback. Your left hand moves the material left of the blade and your right hand move material right of the blade while it is spinning. Never cross your arm over the blade to move a piece while the blade is spinning. Make sure both pieces are free of the blade before turning the saw off. If the piece is too big to cut yourself either get a second person to help cut or use a tracksaw or circular saw with straight edge. Make sure you have adequate space in front and behind the saw to cut the piece you want to cut. Keep blade height no more than 1/16" more than the piece you are cutting if possible.
    3 points
  7. Doesn't look like any dewalt grinder I've ever seen in the US, where its supposedly made. Looks to me like a fake copied off their cordless model dcg412 without the hand guard, but as far as I know they never made a corded model like that. Another thing that doesn't look right are the Phillips head fasteners where dewalt typically uses torx head fasteners
    3 points
  8. New saw and stand, courtesy of Lowes. Wife loves it!
    3 points
  9. (DWS5031) DEWALT Router TrackSaw Guide Adapter uses the included adapter that is marked for 690 & 890 series routers. Adapter kit works with multiple brands of routers and tracks.
    2 points
  10. Tool Buying Guide.... Tools have been around for a very long time helping people everyday from just being there to show manhood to down right making a living. Everyone has to start somewhere, some people are lucky to have other people in their lives to help with this part of life by showing them the ropes. I'm going to go over a few things you should think about if you are ready to have tools be part of your everyday life for helping with self accomplishment or profit. There are many brand names available that tend to show off their flagship tools, with ads that tend to make the tougher jobs look simple, that is all well and fine if you have experience with tools but what if you don't. If you are ready to dip into the tool world and have very little to no experience here are a few things to think about. You can start out with basic hand tools like a hammer, tape measure, and a hand saw but now days we all want convenience as well..... so power tools are usually the way to go. Many brands offer corded power tools in pretty much every shape or form but taking a step further are cordless power tools. Now in saying that many brands have most all cordless power tools needed to do almost every tasks. Some manufactures cater to different area's of the work force, not all brands offer all kinds of tools in every field, think about what you might want to do with your new tools now and in the future. This is important because it can reflect on what brand to buy into. This without saying there is nothing wrong with buying into more than one brand or battery platform but you may want to do this in the future. There are also different power in tools mainly in the volts you see advertised. 12V and 18V/20V are the most common, most tool companies offer many tools in both power ratings. These tools are very different in size and power, the 12V options offer adequate power to handle most things with a compact size as well. The 18v/20v versions are usually the power houses of the line of tools offered. So the question is do I need one or the other or both, well this is where it can get tricky, the 18v/20v versions of the tools are not only larger and heavier but usually come with a larger price tag as well. Again it is not wrong to have or want both but if you are just starting out, the larger more powerful 18v/20v is usually the way to go to get started. Another thing is all the talk about brushed or brushless versions of tools, not all tools are equal not all brands offer all tools in both versions. The newer technology is the brushless tools and they usually come with a higher price. Is the brushless style needed? well not totally. They will however offer slightly more power and battery run time but that is not saying a brushed version is not good. If you are just starting out most times the best economical way to buy your tools are in combo kits, you will receive multiple tools that are mainly paired up with a drill/driver and an impact/driver, Note about impact drivers: Although most manufactures introduced the impact driver not all that long ago and deem the new tool to be the drivers of all drivers they don't play nice with every application. As impact drivers tend to pound or hammer when driving, an impact driver is still a great tool for many applications however for some delicate driving a regular drill will do a better job. Some of the larger kits will tent to include a reciprocating saw, circular saw along with a light of some kind. These kits generally come with 2 batteries ranging in power ratings of small compact 1.5 ah right up to 5.0ah batteries and a matching charger. You may think I'm never gonna need these extra tools that are included in the kit but when you add up the costs the more in the kit the cheaper the individual tools become, so in saying that once you do own them and you find you don't use them there is a good chances someone will purchase them from you to help offset the original cost. Do some research, think about what you will want to do, find a big box store that have these different brands on display so you can get a feel for the tools in your own hands, just like seeing a fancy sports car, it may look great but not always are they comfortable for everyone to drive. All different tool companies come with all different warranties for their tools, some are very different from one another some are better than others as well. This can reflect on what brand to buy into but it shouldn't. I am not going to go into what brand is best or what brand to try and avoid but I would stick to brand names that are known. I hope this helps by giving you something to think about before jumping into the tools world.....Good Luck!
    2 points
  11. I have the carrier brackets in my van with 1” square tubing for about 4 years now. Never had any broken brackets or boxing.
    2 points
  12. Carrier brackets are much heavier duty than the shop brackets. I have lots of both. Carrier are made for mobile usage and also fold away. Shop brackets are for static shelving and do not fold away.
    2 points
  13. And there is nothing better for outdoor cooking than something special like artisan bread, with unique smells and healthy, tasty additives. I truly love to order German bread from Edelweiss store, because it's maybe the only store in Fort Lauderdale, that can offer tasty european bread with all the options about it. You should try their goods, I'm telling you.
    2 points
  14. I’ve not posted a lot of tools I’ve bought recently, this is more of a wow why didn’t I get this years ago thing, but the new plunge base attached to my cordless router below that itself attaches to my circle-cutting jog was an absolute joy to use today. Even adding multiple passes I’m much happier doing this now instead of fussing with a corded 1/2” router that would have competently handled it in one or two.
    2 points
  15. I don't see the XGT platform as a great option if you mainly want an impact driver. Yeah, they have one on the platform, but that is a convenience for the folks using XGT for the higher power tools, not really a reason to buy into the platform. When you see the driver alone that is a "bare tool" (model number ends in "Z"; e.g., XDT16z). Kits can either be a single tool with batteries and a charger or they can be "combos" that include multiple tools, batteries, and a charger (sometimes accessories also). If you need the tools anyway and don't want to shop around a ton, combos can be a good deal. For example, I'm not sure if the deal is still going, but recently HD had the top tier impact driver (XDT16) AND top tier hammer drill (XPH14) in a kit with four 5ah batteries (2 in the kit plus two more on promotion), a charger and an XPS bit set for $399. While expensive overall, it is much cheaper than buying all the pieces separately.
    2 points
  16. A couple of reasons Battery needs to be recharged To much stress on the motor so it shut down to protect the motor Battery is too hot and needs to cool off Malfunctioning battery
    2 points
  17. While some people seem to have success with knock off batteries, I personally would steer clear. A lot of times the performance doesn't match the amp hour rating like a genuine battery. Then there are some safety concerns such as does it have the technology to not fry your tool or burn down your house while charging. Not saying that they will and I'm sure there are some that are just fine but to me it's not worth the risk. If you go this route I would just make sure to read reviews and try get somewhat reputable knock offs. Genuine batteries alone aren't cheap and more than likely if you go this route you're probably better off getting a new driver as a kit with batteries if you're kind of leaning that way anyhow.
    2 points
  18. Hitachi/Metabo have made such a product for their tools. After that Dewalt has one for their 12” miter saw. Haven’t heard of Makita or anyone else doing it yet though.
    2 points
  19. This picture got posted on a Makita Facebook group along with a bunch of other new Makita offerings. I think it's notable that it appears to be compatible with both XGT and LXT, which I think would be a first? Other than the XGT charger that is. Might change some people's thoughts on the XGT system. At any rate, its good to know it is a possibility and I hope there are more tools like this coming.
    2 points
  20. I'm going to say the commercial but my memory is a bit rusty when comparing the 2 (I haven't done any string trimming since last fall). My preferred choice in most cases is the commercial. It feels nicer in the hand, the trigger is much better, and the carbon fiber shaft helps to balance out the machine quite nicely. It is more noticeable when a gas unit bogs down than the Ego's. They get tangled and keep on spinning with no noticeable change in motor sound.
    2 points
  21. Yes, the build quality isn't the best compared to Bosch. If you are use to Bosch, Makita, Metabo or Hilti, you will find that Milwaukee is sub par. However Milwaukee is powerful and a great professional brand but we have seen a lot more problems with Milwaukee compared to any other brand.
    2 points
  22. I'm not familiar with that model number...a search pulls up a charger. If it's the 3/8" model 2407, then it's brushed. If it says "FUEL" on it (or "Brushless", though I don't think any M12 tools use this designation), then Wingless is 100% correct. If this is the case, a loose wire or faulty trigger could be causing the issue. Most of my tools are brushless, so the sparks emitted by my brushed tools (including the 2407) are noticeable. They should not be a concern, though. In the days of yore, people kept their corded brushed tools going for decades by maintaining them and replacing the brushes every so often. When I was a forklift technician, replacing the motor brushes was one of the routine repairs for electric fork trucks. Edit: Here is a picture of the data plate for my brushed M12 drill.
    2 points
  23. I recently bought the DWE7491RS table saw as well, and put my dado blades on this morning to make some cuts for cabinets I'm making. Had the same issue with the blade height dropping. It took a couple of calls, but found the answer! The Dewalt factory service techs were outstanding. The height adjustment knob is attached to a horizontal rod that connects to a vertical rod under the table top with a pair of sprockets (or pinion). Immediately below that pinion on the vertical rod is a nut. Tighten that nut with a 17mm wrench a bit while holding the height adjustment knob. Don't over tighten, or the knob will be difficult to turn. That took care of it.
    2 points
  24. @fm2176 I'm sure it is every bit as quality as the entry level commercial units. I was just saying pros tend to compare any given mower they get to try out with an offering from their preferred brand and typically it is not the entry level offering it is more in the high end territory. It's not entirely their fault because they mostly use the mowers they already have to compare to. These units are typically a higher end offering. I think build quality wise the commercial Ego string trimmer is in my opinion the best built string trimmer currently on the market. The commercial units from the likes of Stihl, Echo, and Makita don't even have metal housings around the motors or even metal triggers where the Ego does. Ego is the only one that offers a carbon fiber shaft which to my knowledge is the only company that offers this. I would recommend watching Stanley's video on the mower.
    2 points
  25. The recipe is really good actually! I tried it yesterday for my family dinner and everyone loved it.
    2 points
  26. Continuing to use the "post-style" batteries would have been the death of dewalt. For a home-owner grade tool like ryobi it works because people aren't using the tools every day to make a living. With dewalt being a pro-grade tool they needed to keep current with battery technology and ergonomics. Had they done it sooner I probably would have never jumped ship to milwaukee. If you're really dead set on sticking with your old tools as its been mentioned you can still buy new xrp batteries or get an adaptor.
    2 points
  27. I'm very interested in the two XGT rear handle saws being released and I think I saw an XGT X2 chainsaw too. A 1/2 router, belt sander, tablesaw (X2) and vacuum (X2) would be attractive.
    2 points
  28. At least two XGT X2 tools are ready for market, 20J rotary hammer (HR006G) and demolition hammer (HM002G).
    2 points
  29. I scored two new to me tools this weekend. The first is a Toledo No. 1 pipe vise from my wife's grandparents' shed. It needs cleaning but should come in handy in the shop. The second is a Jet DC-650 dust collector. We got a heads up on some free cabinets, and the shop we picked them up at (they were new but had been sitting for five years) had both a radial arm saw and a dust collector sitting outside. The shop had closed by the time we returned, and the RAS was gone (probably just moved out of the shop for the cleaning they were doing), but the dust collector was still there. One of the co-owners was still there, so I asked about it and he told me I could take it. No idea what, if anything, is wrong with it, but it was full of dust and needs to have the cord replaced. The DC-650 doesn't have the best reviews but free can't be beat.
    2 points
  30. Brushless is more efficient, so you will get more power and longer run time. They claim the motor itself will last longer too. IMO, brushless is a little overrated but if you want the best, most powerful tool; you cant go wrong with brushless. I own brushed and brushless tools and they both do the job they were built to do.
    2 points
  31. my horn cutter for cattle was broke last week so i tried to fix it but it was not working properly or maybe i have been using this for cutting horns for soo long and now it was not able that we can use it so at last today i ordered a new cutter for cattle and it looks like this
    2 points
  32. An air compressor tank is designed to remain pressurized 24/7/365. The best method for control of water condensed from air water vapor is to install an automatic tank drain purge valve, that burps air / water out from a bottom bung to a drain location. Every air compressor already includes an unloader / check valve, that automatically purges the pressurized air between the tank and the compressor, so the compressor is free to start against atmospheric pressure, instead of struggling to start against a pressurized tank. That is the audible hiss after the compressor stops.
    2 points
  33. Here’s a lil impact tool porn lol man it feels good to get them back and upgraded after my truck was stolen with my other older models..
    2 points
  34. Welcome to the forum. There are still zero FlexVolt safety issues issues being reported on the DeWALT site or on the CPSC site. My suggestion is to report the details both to the manufacturer and to the CPSC, instead of only to a forum, so appropriate action may be implemented. There is a reason why the Owner's Manual has four pages of battery and battery charger safety instructions (that everyone fails to read).Lithium Ion batteries have a very high energy density and all safety procedures must be followed.
    2 points
  35. Do not let any part of your body possibly closer that 6" to the blade. Do not let your hand go over the blade. Use push sticks, featherboards, fence/miter-guide/sliding-table and guards!
    2 points
  36. Picked up the impact driver and sawzall on black Friday deals, aaand I think I'm done spending money on toola for a bit. Kind of lucked out, as I have pretty much everything I wanted for work, and managed to get everything on a good sale except for the 3/4" impact.
    2 points
  37. I'm seeing more mods to Packout than Tough System. I think the hardcore modular storage users were slightly disappointed with TS2.0. While it is an improvement in some areas over TS1.0, I don't think it is what users really wanted in a TS2.0. Sure you got the vast majority of people who just need a storage system. The flaws in Tough System aren't a deal breaker for them. If it stores the items they need it to store then thats good enough. As someone who has invested roughly $1000 into TS1.0 I am finding it harder and harder to justify getting more Tough System. Some products in the line are in short supply others I just don't need. If I had to start over with a new modular system (in addition to my systainers) I would most definitely go with Packout considering they are getting the E-track shelves and drawer units. I'd like to see Milwaukee become a Packout dealer like Tanos.
    2 points
  38. STAFDA 2020 - new tools from Makita Tower lights, updates to XPH07 and several sub-compact tools, and several more X-lock grinders, but no table saw or belt sanders.
    2 points
  39. Just came across this forum and figured I’d join up. Not really much of a poster for the most part but love to read reviews. I may not be the most knowledgeable But above average for sure I do love tools. My first cordless tool platform I had was Hitachi. I ran both nicad and lithium. Ended up having issues with the drill and when it came time to replace they had switched from the pod style batteries to the slide. I made the switch to the yellow guys and I can say I have no complaints. I think any of the big names will satisfy most people. I love the selection in the dewalt line up. I think I had 9 tools in my “collection” of Hitachi I’ve probably doubled that in dewalt. I am a jack if all trades not a contractor. I buy tools when I see a deal not because I need them that day but one day... yeah some call it an addiction.
    2 points
  40. In bright sunlight you are going to have a hard time seeing any laser line. For outside work your are best to use a laser receiver.
    2 points
  41. Keep the one your most comfortable with, most things are made in China these days. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2 points
  42. I have used Black and Decker, Bosch, DeWALT, Festool, and Skill branded sanders. My favorites were Festool followed by Bosch. The Black and Decker Was by far the worst sander I have ever used. I hope to never use one again. Festool corded 5 in random orbital for $205 is what I would recommend for a corded option. You can also get the bare tool cordless/corded for $225.The dust collection and vibration reduction are superb on the Festool sanders. Bosch makes a decent 5 in for around $100. DeWALT’s are also decent. I’m not sure on pricing. If you want rectangular or delta pad orbitals you will pay a bit more if going with Festool. I know DeWALT sells the rectangular pad sanders but it would be without hook and loop paper.
    2 points
  43. Hey crew just wanted to post some pics of a lil project I just finished
    2 points
  44. USMC Mustang: Great reply and I have a couple of questions if I may. Item #2: The reduced run time seems to be the most common complaint for the ZT480s. Have you done the Ryobi recommended battery test of load testing each battery individually? I was experiencing increased Battery Level Meter bars out on my RM480 in the first year of use. Ryobi had me individually charge each battery and then load test them (took them to a local battery shop for the test). One didn't past muster and was replaced. Mower ran (and still runs) better than new. Item#3: I'm extremely interested in the lithium batteries you used. I've heard several people wanting to try the change, but you are the first I've heard of to do so. What make, model, voltage, ahr, etc. I have seen my OEM pack at 52.2 volts immediately after completing a charge, and it ran fine. Ryobi also told me the system shuts down completely when the pack voltage drops below 36 volts, but I'm not sure how the system is really measuring things as the BLM does not read reliably by volts, so the controllers must be measuring something in addition. The system is supposed to shut the blade motors off with enough charge to let you drive back to the charger. I run with a separate volt meter plugged into the charging port so I can see dynamically the charge being used. I would guess the lithium chemistry behaves differently enough to "fool" the electronics that are designed for the SLA/AGM chemistry. How did you charge the lithium batteries? With the Ryobi charger and onboard controller, or a separate charger? Item #4: First I've heard of the squeaky rear bearings on a ZT480, best advice is to call Ryobi at the toll free number on the label under the seat with the model number, serial number, and manufacturer number from the label also. I wonder if it's the brakes?
    2 points
  45. Been picking up on my painting again been super blessed with jobs I’ll be posting more pics soon. Hope the crew in here has been safe and well on here!!
    2 points
  46. Milwaukee has a new digital only event called Pipeline coming later this month. You have to register to watch. It is essentially replacing NPS for this year at least. http://info.milwaukeetool.com/dc/yhpCuHxm0kkjDnMdneCy4mp289lLLfH8aYu1uW7xkIDOCNO_TzLYvKEFb3Qkx0bYtRB34hgupa1-WdeL1zTVllpMUSBj46HPHrYEa1BwVlmeZi1Uer-1_YCP0wJXFeNuizWEqm0WIWn7TqbpWkixw0gz1P-sF6oGfEHHVQ3FXLmihUwS_OykxkziBwjcUrTHFOn7Ay6DWZPNjB_dm8MZgNgkrYLAD8uth97vIov6mXbgUUl05ZG0PaigxQK9uOpwjY5GWFiKCJcqjyFV3tlS8UPbhhawn1SPpLfqyMyN8yUyJ_A2goHaLGfmi-pWsSU2bhzawS5BsLbb50mtr7RtbauAesDa2KZIIMIbZi0oT44=/wN8DB4DLG0000RJj20X2I0J
    2 points
  47. I like that deal. If I needed a light, i would scoop that up.
    2 points
  48. Listen It's like when you guy to buy a truck, do you get it in 2 Wheel drive or 4 Wheel drive. Personal I choose the 4 Wheel drive mode ( self propelled ) because it is nice to have it when you need it. If you are powering through high grass, as I did already, squeeze the drive and walk right through a patch of 4 foot grass that hadn't been mowed all year. I will warn you, start on slow speed as the self propelled will run a heck of a lot faster than you can fast walk. Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
    2 points
  49. Panasonic! That's why when you open up the batteries on almost every tool battery you will find Panasonic lithium ion batteries. Dewalt, Milwaukee, Makita, doesn't matter. They all use the same manufacturer. They can very the model number and thus the size and society of the batteries and there are tons of arguments about various series-parallel arrangements but the actual cells are the same. However there is a temperature sensor and usually some kind of "size" feedback to the controller in the tool battery pack at a bare minimum, plus different contacts and some battery management stuff. This makes it hard to make a knockoff battery. Most knockoffs salvage old used battery packs at least for the electronics. But most also harvest old, used, but not yet failed batteries too and then add more salvaged batteries or out of spec grey market batteries (rejects) or even old lower capacity cells to it. So what you get is a Frankenstein battery. It might work for a while or it might not. Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
    2 points
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