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Showing content with the highest reputation since 08/19/2021 in all areas

  1. Welcome to the forum. The OP made this door for his customer's cabin. It is not a commercial application. IMO the construction is beautiful and is infinitely superior and more durable than the pressed paper slurry hollow core doors that are being installed everywhere. During a recent remodel I needed to install some door slabs. Several were the molded six panel paper slurry doors. Because of the dimensions and required features several needed to be wooden doors. The difference was WOW amazing (at a higher cost). I would love to have doors made by the OP in my home!
    2 points
  2. You need to have an object of use. If you want to wash your car, you want something with high gpm to get good foam and quick rinse. Electric pressure washers are fine but don't get much psi or gpm. For your car, you might want to get an entry level gas unit with a good pump and a Honda engine, and then buy higher orifice nozzles so you get lower pressure with a lot more water flow. This will help get better foam and make rinsing quick and easy. A good entry level gas machine with a Honda and a decent pump will run you about 400 USD or 3377.44 Turkish lira (I am assuming you live in turkey based on your bio.) Hope this helps.
    2 points
  3. The brad nails are interchangeable. If you turn the lights down low and play some Lionel Ritchie while putting in the brads your nailer won’t notice the difference.
    1 point
  4. Nothing that large in diameter for wood in a name brand. Here is a Makita set that goes up to ¼" diameter.
    1 point
  5. I run a marina in southeast Missouri. One of the biggest things that can hurt our marina is snow/ice build-up on our roofs. When the snow starts piling up we have to get on the roof and shovel the snow off before it sinks the docks. Last year I borrowed a small Toro gas snowblower and it cruised through the snow with ease, however, it only threw the snow about 6', which meant I spent a lot of time blowing snow that I had already blown (if that makes sense). The other drawback is that the roof is your typical corrugated barn tin, with ridges and sheet metal screws sticking up - the snow blower kept getting snagged on the screws. I would like to find a lightweight (have to haul it up on a ladder to the roof) snowblower that can deal with uneven surfaces. I'm no he-man so am hoping for something that weighs around 30-50 lb. I've been looking at the battery/cordless options and think that's going to be my best bet (unless I can find a gas snowblower that weighs around 30-40 lb). It would have to be able to throw snow at least 20' to get the snow off the roof. The uneven surface issue leads me to think I will need a rubber scraper/blade solution. We have to get the snow off the roof before it gets greater than 3", otherwise our docks start to sink. This means I don't need a very powerful snow blower. I welcome any constructive input/suggestions/thoughts/ideas/etc that you would share.
    1 point
  6. Welcome to the forum.
    1 point
  7. The bamboo floor covering feels very lovely under your feet. In addition, it is very light. However, I know that it absorbs odors or liquids well. You will need to be careful when lighting a fire in the fireplace. You will also need to make sure that the guests do not spill dark liquids on the floor. Otherwise, the bamboo will absorb all the liquid, and the color will remain on the floor. When we called the floor laying company from https://www.123floor.co.uk, they warned us that it was not very thoughtful to put a bamboo floor in the kitchen, so we laid the foundation in the living rooms with bamboo and left laminate flooring in the kitchen and by the fireplace.
    1 point
  8. I bought a couple spare ego commercial trimmer heads. I found out they are compatible with the powerhead string trimmer. Super awesome because the quick reloading heads on the power head break quite easy. My last residential head I started using this year and it already broke. The commercial one will last quite a bit longer. I have yet to break the commercial head after heavy use.
    1 point
  9. Few months ago I decided to work on welding but I couldn't find what actually I need to learn, and here I get the idea about welding. I got my solution from here https://bestmigwelders.org/lotos/mig175-review/ , Just amazing article which helps me to choose the best option.
    1 point
  10. Hi! Glad to join the forum!
    1 point
  11. Looks nice. That looks like it might be my next purchase. Now I just have to save up for it.
    1 point
  12. Also, sad to see them exit gas power completely. They are taking Dolmar, the originators of the gas chainsaw, with them.
    1 point
  13. https://www.smith-wesson.com/product/model-29 It's a tool. Bought it to (finally) replace the Model 19 that was stolen back in December 2012. I have a feeling another .357 will be coming soon as a more practical carry revolver. Now I need to order a couple of speed loaders and a few speed strips, and find a couple of decent holsters.
    1 point
  14. DeWALT is releasing a new Impact driver with essentially the same specs as the 887. According to the specs sticker on the tool, it has a bit more ipm but otherwise the same specs. The biggest difference is the size. The tool is now 4 inches from back to front. So small that the battery sticks out farther than the chuck. Shortest impact that I know of. In my search I found no impact that was as short as the DeWALT. The tool has xr branding but apparently it is an atomic tool. The picture shows no Atomic branding. It was pictures of a European model which might have different branding than North America. Travis from Tools by design made a post about it. https://www.instagram.com/p/CSzaFkxnWVw/
    1 point
  15. No other regular impact driver is shorter than this. you would have to move into right angle impacts.
    1 point
  16. Top looks like an old tack hammer, the bottom looks like a staple or tack remover. Both look to be upholstery tools.
    1 point
  17. Cool. Thanks for sharing. Click save and a side by each of new DCF850 to a DCF887. FWIW, here is my DCF887 topic. Eyeball measurement looks identical dimension from trigger face to rear surface. Everything else got smaller. The gear box behind the chuck is smaller and the motor is smaller. Interesting that there is now a couple degree head tilt, likely so the battery doesn't prevent the head from reaching the work surface. Nice job DeWALT!
    1 point
  18. I have three years of accumulated usage and charge data and I still can't equate voltage usage with percentage left and bars out. However, the percentage shown on the meter does equate with bars out, but I still don't know how meter calculates things. Even bars out doesn't equate to recharge wattage. It must be something unique to how the SLA/AGM discharge under load. I have learned that the three different lawn sizes I mow will use varying amounts of charge, no matter what I do.
    1 point
  19. I hate hearing about getting fired because I have some bad flashbacks. Now I understand that there's nothing wrong with it, life has its ups and downs, and I can always find a new job, but I really like the current one that I found on this platform. I think my employer likes me, but I don't know for sure.
    1 point
  20. Given recent events, I feel that this thread is especially relevant. An entire generation of Americans (and the citizens of our allied nations) was affected by the events of 9/11, and the fall of Afghanistan will probably go down in history as an example of failed American intervention not unlike the fall of South Vietnam. I'll finally be going home next year, after twenty-plus years of military service. My home is no longer where I grew up, but rather a place the Army stationed me, a place where I recruited young men and women while the war in Iraq drew to a close and Afghanistan flared up. Twenty years ago I was a young road technician working for a material handling equipment company. On September 10th I was suddenly let go, and on the 11th I was job-seeking online when I saw some comments about the towers. I turned around and my mother-in-law was watching the news show video footage of the event. Nevertheless, I continued my job search, though I did check in on a few old friends to discuss the attacks. A little over a month later I was signing my Army contract, fulfilling a dream I'd had since I was a kid...a dream previously hindered by past mistakes. In the intervening 20 years, I've lost a lot of friends, both military and civilian. My unit and I invaded Iraq together and saw the side of war I always wanted to see. Ten years later, my unit went to Afghanistan, where they placed me as an Operations NCO (semi)safely behind the wire. One tour of each, with little personal investment in either country. The War in Iraq became something foreign to the war I fought, while my experience in Afghanistan was watching the war on TV and occasionally getting rocketed. This isn't about me, though. It's about us. All of us know, or at least know of, someone affected by the events of 9/11. Whether directly (9/11 itself) or indirectly (the resulting wars), America was forever changed. It's fitting that we seem to have forgotten why we were in Afghanistan in the first place. Should we have stayed so long? I don't think so, but I'm not a decision maker. Regardless, history will label Afghanistan as a military failure and as an example of failed American interventionism. Americans will continue to politicize every event, the media will continue to instigate division, and the events of 9/11/2001 will continue to fade from our collective memories. Until the next time...
    1 point
  21. Got myself a new tool for the small jobs in and around the house. DeWalt has always been a reliable brand so decided to treat myself to a new tool Managed to find a good deal on pricesmasher.net
    1 point
  22. As someone who does lawn mowing as their main source of income, The biggest issue I see with the electric equipment is not power. It is runtime and rpm. If you want runtime you have to either buy a bunch of batteries or buy a backpack battery. Either option will be a good amount of money. Most battery equipment has loads of torque but lack in rpm. The Ego string trimmers I use are in the 5000-6000 rpm range while a gas unit would be 7000-10000+ rpm. Also you don't have many options for 17in+ battery powered string trimmers. Also .095 is likely your max size of line. My commercial grade Ego is only 15in with a max of .095. My Ego made my 21cc Echo look weak but if I had the 25cc would I be saying the same? I'm not sure. Electric is hard to compare to gas because with electric you basically have max torque all the time. With the gas unit the torque varies quite a bit depending on the rpm. I can get the head on my electric to spin up from a stop with tall growth tangled around it. A gas unit would likely seize up if it tried to do the same from a stop. At least my 21cc wouldn't have enough torque at 0 rpm to get the head spinning if tangled in tall growth. Many of the handheld lawn tools are still supplementary to gas for most lawn professionals. Unless you're someone like me who has enough batteries to get through a day you still will have gas as backup. The first and probably only lawn tool in 2021 that I can't justify having the gas counterpart (even for the pros) is hedge trimmers. Runtime on hedge trimmers even in the least efficient configuration (tiny battery and brushed motor) give great runtimes. For most jobs you don't need a ton of power and if you need a bit more power you can always upgrade to the brushless model and likely get more power. Every other tool will have some kind of compromise
    1 point
  23. described pretty well. But I guess you should mention some of the brand so that we can choose.
    1 point
  24. this is now solved. The problem was the battery charger.
    1 point
  25. I have no idea what that tool is, very wierd. That's a cool floor. Don't see subs usually cut at an angle, very cool.
    1 point
  26. great true quality matters thanks for informational guide
    1 point
  27. Great thread Comp, also i would like to add Design and ergonomics should be considered along with the Power i.e Variable speed . and type of motors used. should be checked before buying a tool. hope this helps
    1 point
  28. The guide is excellent. It is helpful to know the basic concepts of tools. But as for me, it would be necessary to make lists of brands for beginners and advanced users. And also lists of manufacturers by price category. I mean, make lists of brands that are recommended. Because not all of them are great.
    1 point
  29. Out of a job the other day, trimming the grass from out under fence and I came up with pro tip that will be very handy to anyone.. . The tip. Only run the line trimmer at a speed that can cut the grass.. You'll be surprised just how slow that is. (2 strokes are better at this than 4 strokes.) I run my 25cc Ryobi line trimmer as slow as I can, AND is still cuts grass under a fence line. There are 2 big advantages to this. 1. You'll use less fuel 2. Your line will not break when you hit the fence post. I did a couple of job during the week.. 2 whole property fence lines. Did not add more line once. The line on there looks thinner, but it has not broken once.. You can thank me later. Try this.
    1 point
  30. Took me a while but it is finally done. My home made relaxation tool.
    1 point
  31. @mohawkdec, I hate to say it, but as this forum is slowly dying, I think that formerly respected posters are becoming mere trolls. If a user dislikes Milwaukee, stay out of this forum and don't go trying to spread disinformation on brands and/or independent sites. As for my unchallenged comment, ToolGuyd is being as pro-USA and non-brand fanboy as usual: here he discusses the Stanley Powerlock promo and how he considered buying a non-Milwaukee product despite a lack of need, before deciding against it due to COO. Given the lack of response, I'll continue frequenting ToolGuyd as an objective and knowledgeable reviewer of tools.
    1 point
  32. I've always considered Toolguyd to be one of the few tool review sites that is overtly objective and honest about its articles. Take this comparison of M18 HD and Flexolt for example, in which Stuart makes the following comment, "Both Dewalt and Milwaukee are at the top of their games right now. I am really hoping that nobody asks 'so, which one would you buy?,' frankly because that would be an extremely tough decision". His site has an entire category devoted to Made in the USA tools, and unless something's changed in the past couple of years, he's never accepted any sponsors. He's mentioned his code of ethics many times as they pertain to review samples: he sends back, gives away, or donates products after he's finished with them (as evidenced by the number of giveaways he's conducted). As for your final point, Stuart addressed his lack of trade experience here. Of particular note is his observation that "The people that design, build, and market the tools tradesmen and pros use – they’re not tradesmen or pros either." Please elaborate if you know anything I don't, as I don't want to be deceived or risk getting poor information. If ToolGuyd is as bad as you say, I'll remove it from my list of daily sites to visit.
    1 point
  33. Giveaways like UTB are supposedy returning when the new TIA headquarters are fully up and running. I may be a young one here (24) and one would probably think the younger people would prefer IG and YT over a forum. I prefer the forum in many ways over YouTube and Instagram. I still heavily use IG and YT but the forum still has its place. It is so much easier to discuss tool stuff here, ask questions, etc. I find it a lot more organised with better ways to send messages. I feel as though questions and whatnot tend to get missed more often on IG and YT then they do here.
    1 point
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