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Question about laquer finishing


JerryNY

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Just a question for the woodworking experts on here. Some background first; I'm in the process of renovating a kitchen and as I come closer to the end I'm doing some detail work. One thing I'm making is a trim surround for a wall-oven that sits in a brick wall. I'm trying to frame it with a surround that matches some of the gray colored cabinetry of the kichen and got a can of matching gray laquer from the manufacturer. After some experimenting I'm going to go with a some clear semigloss deft laquer over the base color coat to match the sheen of the cabinets. 

 

I was wondering if I'm better off making it out of mdf for a smoother painted surface or just use maple like the cabinets and if I should use a laquer sanding sealer on the mdf/wood then just sand, apply base coat and then multiple semi-gloss clears on top? Do I need to prime the wood if using the sealer?

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated...

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first off, I never use lacquer sanding sealer, all i use is a damp cloth with water to condition the wood. no need for any kind of primer. if you are going to use maple sand blow off with air wipe down with damp cloth (even to actually get wood slightly wet) then once dry about 10 minutes apply lacquer. depending on glossiness of cabinets you can match luster with 000 steel wool. by sanding if it is to glossy. I wouldn't suggest MDF if it is a border for an oven as it will capture moister and heat and it eventually may distort.

best is to use a test piece of maple and follow the steps to see what you need to do to get the same finish as other cabinets 

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Thanks for the reply, good points about mdf near the oven. Kinda makes you wonder what happened to mdf kitchen cabs with ovens in them though...

 

I figured I could use steel wool to knock down the gloss if need be. Funny thing is the enamel laquer spray paint from the factory seems to give a nice satin sheet but the cabinets are definitely more glossy, kinda between satin and semi so it's easier to knock down the sheen than the reverse. From the looks of trim boards on other parts of the kitchen they definitely put a clear coat, many many coats from fhe look of it, over the base color to give the color lots of depth. I hope I have enough paint considering it costs like $40 a can and I want to paint some corbels too!!! ?

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13 minutes ago, JerryNY said:

Thanks for the reply, good points about mdf near the oven. Kinda makes you wonder what happened to mdf kitchen cabs with ovens in them though...

 

I figured I could use steel wool to knock down the gloss if need be. Funny thing is the enamel laquer spray paint from the factory seems to give a nice satin sheet but the cabinets are definitely more glossy, kinda between satin and semi so it's easier to knock down the sheen than the reverse. From the looks of trim boards on other parts of the kitchen they definitely put a clear coat, many many coats from fhe look of it, over the base color to give the color lots of depth. I hope I have enough paint considering it costs like $40 a can and I want to paint some corbels too!!! ?

true enough, however any kitchen I seen properly installed actual plywood was used in the oven area.....

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Yeah but the nature of laquer means every coat

diasolves the one under it so it makes for a much easier process to get a really smooth result. It dries fast and you can do another coat in 30 minutes and you don't even need to sand much. A novice can make a laquer job look nearly perfect, it's a much steeper learning curve to get good with polys and takes much more patience too ?

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  • 1 month later...

Thanks for all the input. I decided to avoid mdf and go with poplar but it got warped a bit sitting in my garage for a few weeks and decided to just go with maple like the cabs. I got nearly a perfect match to the cabinet color and sheen. I'm pretty happy with the outcome, I'm just a DIY hack, and it cleans up the oven surround greatly:

 

image.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpegimage.jpeg

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Oh look a Milwaukee box!! 

That's pretty sweet looking, Kind of forgot about this project you've undertaken, thanks for the update! How do you like the ovens and where they are situated in regards to the rest of the counters? 

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23 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Oh look a Milwaukee box!! 

That's pretty sweet looking, Kind of forgot about this project you've undertaken, thanks for the update! How do you like the ovens and where they are situated in regards to the rest of the counters? 

Lol, yeah it's a Milwaukee box. I LOVE this oven. It's microwave/convection top and convection on the bottom too so you get the best of both worlds and lots of versatility. The microwave is stainless inside too it looks as quality as the outside and it's pretty big too. Also the huge advantage of having an oven wall mounted away from the main work area and cooktop is twofold. 1) you can be baking something and have the heat away from your range top so you aren't getting double blasted with heat and 2) you can get a range base cabinet with two massive drawers for all your pots that you actually use on the cooktop. It's a win win - also no microwave wasting cabinet space or counter space and you can go with a more decorative and powerful  hood hat actually works instead of the microwave/exhaust fan combos which don't work as well.image.jpegimage.jpeg

 

 

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18 minutes ago, JimboS1ice said:

Loving your kitchen my man

Jimbo

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thank you that's kind of you to say. 

 

BTW - that brick was a major PITA to strip. There were like 15 coats of paint, my favorite being SILVER METALLIC SPRAY PAINT!?! I got a Milwaukee diamond grout blade for my sawzall that worked great on the mortar and put a rough skim coat of mortar on the concrete lintel across the top to make it more rustic looking.

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Thanks all. I do ok but don't compare to some of you pros. The bottom fit is a little loose intentionally by the corbels, I made it removeable with a few screws to be able to remove the wooden frame to service the oven if need be without destroying the whole thing.

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Thanks all. I do ok but don't compare to some of you pros. The bottom fit is a little loose intentionally by the corbels, I made it removeable with a few screws to be able to remove the wooden frame to service the oven if need be without destroying the whole thing.

This is so important, how it's able to be serviced one day, because that day will come, good thinking!

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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6 minutes ago, JerryNY said:

Thanks all. I do ok but don't compare to some of you pros. The bottom fit is a little loose intentionally by the corbels, I made it removeable with a few screws to be able to remove the wooden frame to service the oven if need be without destroying the whole thing.

You will always be your biggest critic, guarantee by naked eye nobody would know if its a little loose.. awesome job dude!

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