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Bought a New Metal Lathe Anyone else into machining


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I got my lathe set up yesterday. I've never turned anything before. I've jumped in head first. I've always wanted to start machining. Got a grizzly g0752 variable speed 10"x22"

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Fazzman!

Actually I've turned a few things from brass, aluminum, steel, just to make a few things for myself. Used an old tradeschool one a buddy has, forget the manufacturer. Definitely like doing it, like turning wood better though.

Pretty sweet you got that for yourself, what did that cost you?

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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Something I always wanted to do. Never had a chance. Shop ones were broken at the HS underfunded shop (until this year, they just got some grant from the state and so now my lucky younger brothers get to play with brand new everything, Lincoln gave them all free helmets, new welders, Genie the terex company gave them a bunch of stuff and they just got all new saws and a half million dollar snap-on tool set with the RFID tool tracking boxes) Back on topic, I want to do some of this but no time no money and no equipment.

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I hear ya.  

It was a pretty penny specially for me!!!! ( I used all of my longevity check from work then put the rest on a paypal credit card with 0.00% interest for 6 months. So it shouldn't be to bad) over  $1,800 with shipping the Table I got a killer deal on for only $50.00.  The guy I bought the table from is a machinist by trade and gave me about $70-$90 worth of dial indicators protractors rulers depth gauges 

 

I know I have ALOT to learn but I figured even if it takes me 5 years to get good.  Well Im that much better than if I waited 5 years to start learning you know what I mean.  

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My grandpa has an older benchtop south bend lathe that I've used some. In high school I took a metal working class and we had a few big jet lathes and we made a few things in there. If I managed to use a lathe without screwing anything up I'm sure you can too. Just go slow and take your time. I think Fazzman is a machinist, I'm sure he will be able to help.

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Just saw this man,been busy with the crazy heat temps hitting Cali now.

 

 All my life 3rd gen machinist here. Grew up machining with my grandpa and dad. Ever need any info or tooling info or just wanna chat im generally around bro.

 

Now that you have a lathe and indicators a mag base or two if you dont have,and a decent set of calipers if you dont have. Depending on what you plan on making micrometers. Micrometers can often be found for cheap sometimes at local pawn shops,just make sure they come with a standard and dont look like some goof tried to use it for a C clamp.

 

Id start with something of decent length that is easy to machine so you can make sure the tail stock is in alignment with chuck. Other wise when you put say a drill chuck in the tailstock to drill a hole your center line may be off which can cause all sorts of tooling and part issues.  

 

Also acid brushes and containers for cutting oil,I like spillmaster containers,will be way less messy than coolant. Acid brushes are super cheap at like harbor freight. CRC also makes cutting oilin a spray can that works great too.

Hex keys and Torx wrenches are used on alot of tooling holders and such.Combination center drills,HSS 118° drills,Air compressor hose nearby for blowing off chips and parts. Bench grinders with proper wheels for HSS and Carbide tools so you can sharpen/change bit profiles. Some decent hand files(I prefer Nicholson files),in the lathe you can do whats called Lathe filing(deburring with chuck spinning). please make sure files have handles on them otherwise bad things could happen to your hands or worse. Also no long hair or loose clothing near the chuck or spinning part. And of course safety glasses. Cant stress safety enough with lathes. 

 

There's a book by the L.S. Starrett company called the Starrett book for student machinists. Its very small and doesnt cost much nowadays,and then one day get a Machinerys Handbook. Machinery Handbook is also known as the machinists bible.

Also if you go to like Starrett website you can get free tap and drill charts and such,always nice to have by the machine.  

 

Practicalmachinist.com has a fantastic forum community that has great knowledge.

 

Ill post more when I can get back to my pc later. If you have any local shops nearby go talk to the shop manager and see if they have any scrap stock they wanna let go for the cheap,let them know you just got a lathe and are looking to get started.

 

Comp was a machinist and engineer too. He has some great knowledge to share too.

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I'll try and list some stuff of usefulness here for you and whoever else finds it interesting.

 

An article i made for the Crew regarding Tapping and threads etc  - 

 

machinists practical guide - http://www.morsecuttingtools.com/cgi/CGP2SRIM?PMITEM=20402&PARTPG=CGP2SRFC&PAMENU=Content-type: text/html     

 

I still have one of these my dad gave me,great info in a pocket size package.

 

machining formulae and knowledge base -  http://www.sandvik.coromant.com/en-us/knowledge/pages/default.aspx

 

Mini lathe turning - http://www.mini-lathe.com/Mini_lathe/Operation/Turning/turning.htm

 

Machinerys handbook pdf -  https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwMSCZJ_SEEhaDV4RzEyUFYtM2c/view

 

Filing guide - http://www.nicholsontool.com/MagentoShare/media/documents/nicholson-guide-to-filing-2014.pdf

 

 

I'll think of more but there's alot of info above and defo more than you might even want  to know in the beginning. Id save the machinerys handbook pdf for sure. It literally has anything you'd ever want to know about the metalworking trades in it.

 

Most important thing to remember when turning in a lathe is make sure your tool is on center when cutting.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ive been posting some machining stuff on my instagram for those who arent following yet.

 

Doing some Biomedical stuff for UC Davis and a few other medical companies now.

 

Just got a brand new Haas VF2 SS CNC mill in the shop last week. Getting stuff situated to get it up and running as we can. The new control is similar but has changed in so many ways from the Haas ive run in past. 

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I wish it was mine.One day ill have one in my garage just gotta get 3 phase electrical setup.  Althou I will be the main person running and programming it.   I work in a small shop now,just me and the boss and one helper. Low stress,and fun work environment. Hard to find that combo in shops around here. For a while I was just doing only programming for a large company,I missed running machines.

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Yeah there is alot of crazy machining tech nowadays. Its honestly advancing so quickly its hard to keep up.

 

I grew up doing old school manual machining turning handles and I still like manuals. CNC can get boring sometimes especially with large quantities or production runs. Alot of machine shops dont even have manual lathes or mills or any support equipment but to our shop thats our bread and butter. We pride on mixing old school tech with newer tech so its a good mix. Engineers nowadays design some crazy ass nonsense very often and sometimes you have no choice but to use cnc to not only save time but to just stay competitive.

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Thanks for all the comments and great information.

I wont be able to do to much until the lathe is paid for and I can start buying tooling and measuring tools

 

This is my first knurl.  Turned out pretty good.  

With this I turned, faced, knurled and beveled 

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Someone may have lost their temper on the front end loader and broke off the handle.

Here is my first actual fix/project on the lathe. Drilled and taped this solid aluminum rod to screw on. Turned some knurls to help the glue grip better. Filled it up with expanding gorilla glue

 

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