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Ryobi Pulse Driver


Cheng Liu

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello, new to the board and to power tools in general.

 

It's supposed to be a compromise between a drill and a impact driver?

 

Love how they don't list torque nor noise levels..

 

I'm annoyed at the rate at which they release new models. I really want to buy the combo with circ saw, impact driver and drill, but then I realized they are all old and much cooler ones have come out.

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Hello, new to the board and to power tools in general.

 

It's supposed to be a compromise between a drill and a impact driver?

 

Love how they don't list torque nor noise levels..

 

I'm annoyed at the rate at which they release new models. I really want to buy the combo with circ saw, impact driver and drill, but then I realized they are all old and much cooler ones have come out.

Not a compromise but just a different style of impact, I have the ridgid, it's a nice tool very quick and it can't be measured torque wise as it impacts differently than a standard impact. I can't speak for the ryobi but the ridgid is pretty quiet but so fast!

Here's a video of an impact fight with the ridgid and traditional impacts.

Jimbo

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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4 hours ago, Tormund said:

Hello, new to the board and to power tools in general.

 

It's supposed to be a compromise between a drill and a impact driver?

 

Love how they don't list torque nor noise levels..

 

I'm annoyed at the rate at which they release new models. I really want to buy the combo with circ saw, impact driver and drill, but then I realized they are all old and much cooler ones have come out.

I know what you mean. I am considering holding off on the pulse driver because I suspect that they will release a multi-speed one at a later time. It's also why I may be holding off on the stick light, since I assume they will be releasing a hybrid version of that at some point (since it is already available in Australia). 

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Hello, new to the board and to power tools in general.

 

It's supposed to be a compromise between a drill and a impact driver?

 

Love how they don't list torque nor noise levels..

 

I'm annoyed at the rate at which they release new models. I really want to buy the combo with circ saw, impact driver and drill, but then I realized they are all old and much cooler ones have come out.

What's going on, welcome aboard, you ryobi much?

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

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On 6/18/2016 at 6:45 AM, KnarlyCarl said:

What's going on, welcome aboard, you ryobi much?

Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk

 

First time homeowner, excited to "get to work". Home needs new closet shelves, aquarium stands, outdoor chairs, garage shelving to name a few projects I have in mind. Have never built anything other than IKEA furniture, lol. But I am eager to learn.

 

Have a cordless 7.2v ryobi drill, and a corded hammer drill, both are royal blue, so they're pretty old. I figure I won't buy top of the line stuff cause I don't know how well I'll do. I'll start with the master closet, if it passes the wife test, then maybe I'll get nice stuff in the future, so looking at Ryobi and Rigid at the moment. 

 

Amazed how much the higher end brands have come down in price. I recall them being more expensive years ago. Am I wrong?

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On 6/17/2016 at 10:50 PM, JimboS1ice said:

Not a compromise but just a different style of impact, I have the ridgid, it's a nice tool very quick and it can't be measured torque wise as it impacts differently than a standard impact. I can't speak for the ryobi but the ridgid is pretty quiet but so fast!

Here's a video of an impact fight with the ridgid and traditional impacts.

 

Jimbo

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Very strange notion that they could not provide a torque measurement based on the mechanism. Here's Makita's oil impulse driver with both torque and noise measurements: http://toolguyd.com/makita-18v-oil-pulse-impact-driver/

 

Are they different mechanisms?

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Very strange notion that they could not provide a torque measurement based on the mechanism. Here's Makita's oil impulse driver with both torque and noise measurements: http://toolguyd.com/makita-18v-oil-pulse-impact-driver/

 

Are they different mechanisms?

I believe they are a little different but aVe on YouTube did a Reardon of the Ridgid

Jimbo

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Ok, so I found this from a Rigid rep answering on a Rigid Forum:  RTC_Christopher.

"Hi there. I need to clarify my previous comment; the IPM=1700, not the in-lbs torque as I previously stated. My product guy gives me the following explanation - in which torque in an oil pulse driver such as the Stealth Force is calculated differently than in traditional impact drivers (brushed or brushless): Pulse driver torque is not directly comparable to standard impact driver torque for indicating performance. Pulse drivers use a hydraulic drive mechanism instead of a hammer and anvil, so there is no metal on metal contact like a standard impact driver which means the peak torque spikes are not as high. Nonetheless, each pulse of the pulse driver drivers fasteners further than each impact of a standard impact driver, which results in faster driving despite a potentially lower measurable torque. So, in comparing application speed versus torque, the product is listed as 2x faster than a traditional unit."

 

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Ok, so I found this from a Rigid rep answering on a Rigid Forum:  RTC_Christopher.

"Hi there. I need to clarify my previous comment; the IPM=1700, not the in-lbs torque as I previously stated. My product guy gives me the following explanation - in which torque in an oil pulse driver such as the Stealth Force is calculated differently than in traditional impact drivers (brushed or brushless): Pulse driver torque is not directly comparable to standard impact driver torque for indicating performance. Pulse drivers use a hydraulic drive mechanism instead of a hammer and anvil, so there is no metal on metal contact like a standard impact driver which means the peak torque spikes are not as high. Nonetheless, each pulse of the pulse driver drivers fasteners further than each impact of a standard impact driver, which results in faster driving despite a potentially lower measurable torque. So, in comparing application speed versus torque, the product is listed as 2x faster than a traditional unit."

 

I've seen this somewhere before

Jimbo

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16 hours ago, Tormund said:

 

Very strange notion that they could not provide a torque measurement based on the mechanism. Here's Makita's oil impulse driver with both torque and noise measurements: http://toolguyd.com/makita-18v-oil-pulse-impact-driver/

 

Are they different mechanisms?

I believe the mechanism in the Ridgid is the same as an old makita impulse driver (not available in north america) but the new one is different. The rep is partially right but also partially talking out of his ass.

 

1. Torque is easy to measure. In fact it's easier to measure on an impulse driver than impact driver because it's sustained longer.

2. Ridgid doesn't want to publish that torque because they're marketing is by the numbers (but only good ones, look at their impact driver with 2,250!!!!!!! in. lbs. of torque) and by design the torque of an impulse driver is far lower than an impact.

3. Torque isn't just bad at indicating performance of an impulse driver, it's bad for every impact driver because we're driving screws which require a continuous torque not breaking bolts that just require a breakaway torque.  Again look at the brushless ridgid impact driver.

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4 hours ago, JimboS1ice said:

I've seen this somewhere before

Jimbo

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Got it from the questions and answers section for the rigid stealth force on the home depot page. Guy who posted it got it from a Rigid forum presumably. 

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2 hours ago, jeffmcmillan said:

I believe the mechanism in the Ridgid is the same as an old makita impulse driver (not available in north america) but the new one is different. The rep is partially right but also partially talking out of his ass.

 

1. Torque is easy to measure. In fact it's easier to measure on an impulse driver than impact driver because it's sustained longer.

2. Ridgid doesn't want to publish that torque because they're marketing is by the numbers (but only good ones, look at their impact driver with 2,250!!!!!!! in. lbs. of torque) and by design the torque of an impulse driver is far lower than an impact.

3. Torque isn't just bad at indicating performance of an impulse driver, it's bad for every impact driver because we're driving screws which require a continuous torque not breaking bolts that just require a breakaway torque.  Again look at the brushless ridgid impact driver.

I was thinking that they should come up with a new metric to convey performance... 

 

Peak torque should matter, but also total mechanical energy over some unit of time.

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  • 1 month later...
18 hours ago, jeffmcmillan said:

Doesn't sound good from the reviews.

 

There are only two reviews on HD, one not so great and one good. I think there're still a specialty class of tool right now but for $99 it doesn't look to be too bad. It seems like if you value noise reduction over ultimate torque and grunt it's worthwhile if not you'll stick to a regular impact driver. Usually the first iteration of a new tech gets trounced by a more mature competing tech which has gone through many generations of refinement anyway.  

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I find the pulse drivers to be torquier than traditional impacts just due to the lack of noise, it's easier to shear bolts because you don't always catch the impact sound and the rpms are faster too, with your traditional impacts you have that sound guage where you can get a sense of over driving

Jimbo

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