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How to reach hard/inaccessible area to connect 2x4 to concrete to frame out wall


olletsocmit

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So I am trying to finish up an area of my work shop that is behind my oil tank... It's been this way for years b/c it's always been a pain to get to. A few years back I just put shelves in front and put overflow things on them. Now that my basement if fully finished they will be getting moved out. I want to finish framing out the rest of the wall and then put shelving on the back wall to hold a lot of my scrap wood, molding, etc. The problem is that I no way to move the big tank or get behind it. I need to fix the 2x4 to the concrete behind the tank... I was thinking I would just use a 3 ft or so extension on my Milwaukee fuel hammer drill and drill the holes and then set the concrete screws. But there was nothing like that at Home Depot or a few other places I looked, all they have is the 1 ft Milwaukee impact extension. I need something around 3 feet long, whether it's solid or multiple sections so I can drill and then set screws. I will just sit on top of tank to do it. Does anyone have any suggestions? Should I bail on drilling and screwing into the concrete? is there an extension to shoot nails or maybe just a super strong epoxy..?

I have attached some pictures below, there is just enough room to get the wall up behind it w/ about an inch to spare I'm not going to be sheet rocking this part just wanted to frame it out so I could run shelving above the tank.

What you can't see in the pictures is at on the other side of the tank there's about 3 feet of open wall so I have the ability to go behind over there on the other slide and put the board in place and screw or nail the first 2 of about 4 into the concrete. Sorry if the pics are not the best...

6114530092571bacf3acff64808f2d61.jpg

985ad2688834b87a264b1b9629cd85ff.jpgeca309ea58493d6f0cb97e3e61d5f504.jpg

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4 hours ago, olletsocmit said:

So I am trying to finish up an area of my work shop that is behind my oil tank... It's been this way for years b/c it's always been a pain to get to. A few years back I just put shelves in front and put overflow things on them. Now that my basement if fully finished they will be getting moved out. I want to finish framing out the rest of the wall and then put shelving on the back wall to hold a lot of my scrap wood, molding, etc. The problem is that I no way to move the big tank or get behind it. I need to fix the 2x4 to the concrete behind the tank... I was thinking I would just use a 3 ft or so extension on my Milwaukee fuel hammer drill and drill the holes and then set the concrete screws. But there was nothing like that at Home Depot or a few other places I looked, all they have is the 1 ft Milwaukee impact extension. I need something around 3 feet long, whether it's solid or multiple sections so I can drill and then set screws. I will just sit on top of tank to do it. Does anyone have any suggestions? Should I bail on drilling and screwing into the concrete? is there an extension to shoot nails or maybe just a super strong epoxy..?

I have attached some pictures below, there is just enough room to get the wall up behind it w/ about an inch to spare I'm not going to be sheet rocking this part just wanted to frame it out so I could run shelving above the tank.

What you can't see in the pictures is at on the other side of the tank there's about 3 feet of open wall so I have the ability to go behind over there on the other slide and put the board in place and screw or nail the first 2 of about 4 into the concrete. Sorry if the pics are not the best...

6114530092571bacf3acff64808f2d61.jpg

985ad2688834b87a264b1b9629cd85ff.jpgeca309ea58493d6f0cb97e3e61d5f504.jpg

Timmy, you can use a Ramset gun to mail into concrete. My brother and I used one to farm out his entire two bay (sniff...sniff...it pains me Lord, oh how it pains me) garage for stalls. We used the Ramset to put floor joists down and ran the wall frames up to the ceiling joists and nailed them in place.

 

i would add though, be careful about framing in your oil tank. They leak sometimes, oil can be spilt etc. and not being able to access the tank might be a problem. I used my Dewalt hammer to drive tap cons into my foundation wall to hang some particle board walling for my shop. On the souther wall, because of some cast iron pipes, I decided to make free floating walls. I built the walls on the ground and just secured the upper wall to the ceiling jousts. On the back side of the wall I used horizontal support / spacers secured mid way and at the bottomto offer support to the wall to keep it from kicking in so to speak. The space I left behind was about 18" and I can actually take the wall down if I have to service pipes and still have a wall to secure a shelf to as well as a box level an a couple of shelves I made to hold jigs and the like. Additionally I placed a metal wall hanging cabinet on that was for DC bags, battery storage, books. Instruction manuals (unread of course) for all of my tools, extra cutters for my Domino etc. 

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Oh and one more thing....if you decide to nail and box in your oil tank, which I wouldn't do without an access point, I would use the Ramset to fasten your vertical studs on the flat. Then you can screw the studs to the edge of the flat stud.

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Why don't you just build a free standing frame? This way you make the frame, slide it over the tank then you can just put a piece of plywood over the tank, on the frame. Then you can move the plywood to access the tank and you don't have to drill into the wall.

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Maybe I didn't explain this great the reason it needs to be secure is because I'm going to be mounting some shelves that will hold all my scrap wood: 2x4's, trim, molding, etc. I have the ability to put one screw at each end, maybe just epoxy the middle down?

I will spend some time today roughly drawing out my thought let me know what you guys think in the meantime please offer suggestions

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In that case you can do an "h" frame, three "h" shapes, the longer side goes against the wall. Either way you will need to add support bracing, so that would just be less drilling into the wall in an awkward position. If you're putting a lot of wood on there you might want to change the h to an 8(think H but with a top) and use the top hole and above the 8 to slide wood into.

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