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60V Expansion


dilloncorr

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thought of a good tool to have on this platform. A brushless high torque collated floor screwer. We have a Senco AC model and love it. We screw all our subfloors down and can use it for tile underlayment too. Being able to be cordless would make things so much nicer on a new construction site.

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2 hours ago, overanalyze said:

Thought of a good tool to have on this platform. A brushless high torque collated floor screwer. We have a Senco AC model and love it. We screw all our subfloors down and can use it for tile underlayment too. Being able to be cordless would make things so much nicer on a new construction site.

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So you are looking for something like their 20V Drywall gun (DCF620) with an extended nose so you can stay standing and drive screws?

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So you are looking for something like their 20V Drywall gun (DCF620) with an extended nose so you can stay standing and drive screws?

Somewhat. It would need more torque and probably need to run at a slower speed. When we frame our homes and additions we screw down the subfloor vs nailing. Not tripping over a cord doing this would be nice. We have a couple Senco duraspin models.

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Thanks, Long time lurker, finally bite the bullet & made a account. One of my coworkers has one, & she let me use it for a day. It's definitely one of the best m12 tools but I would like to see an 20volt version for dewalt, that has an bigger capacity for rough ins and maybe a light built in for dark cabinets & a guard just in case the pipe shatters while cutting. My company actually just banned the m12 shears because there isn't a guard, &  a couple of people have had pipe shatter into their face.

 

Hey there, yes you are correct. The m12 shears doesn't have any type of guard and can shatter PVC that has become brittle over time especially on a condensing furnace vent. To prevent that, I rock the cutter back and forth as it starts cutting, but even that doesn't guarantee a shatter free cut

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I wonder if @KnarlyCarl has any experience with that occurring.

Yeah just now reading this. PVC that is brittle like from uv exposure will shatter. Cellular core PVC is much easier to cut and I have never had it shatter. Abs is the same way, pretty soft compared to solid PVC pipe

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47 minutes ago, overanalyze said:

Somewhat. It would need more torque and probably need to run at a slower speed. When we frame our homes and additions we screw down the subfloor vs nailing. Not tripping over a cord doing this would be nice. We have a couple Senco duraspin models.

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I think NER used the Makita drywall gun for subfloors.  The dewalt probably has the torque for it too if it had a longer selffeed attachment.

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On August 15, 2016 at 0:00 AM, DR99 said:

It's up to Dewalt if they are going to bring the track saw over. Dewalt hasn't had the best of luck marketing tracksaws

 

 

There isn't much competition stateside for track saws but they don't seem to be as popular over here

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6 hours ago, JimboS1ice said:

 

There isn't much competition stateside for track saws but they don't seem to be as popular over here

My impression on tracksaws is that most folks go with Festool. They were pretty much the first and I think it is the entry drug for many folks with a Festool addiction. I have absolutely no facts or statistics to back up my opinion, but I will offer it just the same...

 

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Breaking down sheet goods with a crew or even a helper is fine on a table saw, but doing it solo is not very fun on thicker sheets. Nothing worse than ripping 3/4" ply solo on a mobile table saw with no outfeed table.  

 

Using track saws on sheet good isn't as comfortable unless the sheet is elevated meaning there's more setup materials, saw horses and a platform to catch or support both sides of the cut.

 

Productivity vs Comfort vs Simplicity. The answer to which is better is different depending on help, materials, do you have a shop or mobile operation, do you have time to setup and breakdown, etc...

 

The answer? Have and use both appropriately regardless of your setup. 

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1 hour ago, jeffmcmillan said:

Americans seem to be a big fan of table saws over tracksaws.

The other thing you never see here are alligator saws.

Very true, and until very recently, never heard of them either(the alligator saw) ... Only while watching a periscope of Australia Dewalt event did I actually see it and realize what it was

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22 hours ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Very true, and until very recently, never heard of them either(the alligator saw) ... Only while watching a periscope of Australia Dewalt event did I actually see it and realize what it was

 

Well for that logically it doesn't make a ton of sense here. The primary use for that is cutting clay blocks, and even though it has many other uses, it's benefits over a standard chainsaw are kind of limited. Better for this or that, but worse for many other things and reasons. 

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1 hour ago, Hugh Jass said:

 

Well for that logically it doesn't make a ton of sense here. The primary use for that is cutting clay blocks, and even though it has many other uses, it's benefits over a standard chainsaw are kind of limited. Better for this or that, but worse for many other things and reasons. 

I still think it would be a blast to give it a shot. We do some work in older hospitals/medical schools where clay tile was used as filler. I can imagine everyone's face when we cut a door and lintel in straight!! I wonder how the alligator would handle plaster on metal lathe?

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On 8/17/2016 at 9:02 PM, Hugh Jass said:

 

Well for that logically it doesn't make a ton of sense here. The primary use for that is cutting clay blocks, and even though it has many other uses, it's benefits over a standard chainsaw are kind of limited. Better for this or that, but worse for many other things and reasons. 

.... You're right, no benefit here that I can see:

....

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