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What is the Dewalt flexvolt stud drill good for?


KnarlyCarl

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No seriously, I am trying to understand what trade the drill is marketed towards.

 

 

 

 

Plumbers, electricians, drywall guys for mixing mud? 

 

Keep in mind I only use carbide tip style hole saws, self feed bits of the size I need have so many drawbacks, it's pointless to use them.

At first i thought it would suit plumbers, such as myself. But I realize I wouldn't have a use for it. The body wouldn't allow the drill in some areas I knew I've run into before with tight spaces. It also weighs more than I would feel useful drilling holes all day in different positions. 

Additionally, I need more precision than just all out drilling blindly in a piece of wood you're going full bore just to show how fast it is. 

The drill I use is my m18 fuel for the usual plumbing rough in. The only other drill I can think that I would benefit from is one such as the cordless hole hawg, where the right angle head with the slim long profile will fit in places just as well as a regular drill. However, I have done house after house for rough in plumbing using just my fuel drill and big hawg hole saws without problem. I would seriously consider getting the hole hawg because it's got the right angle head and a lighter weight design. If you're already invested in the dewalt line, you put a carbide tip hole saw in a dcd995/6 drill and you could comfortably plumbing rough out a whole house. 

 

It actually looks useful for electricians though, as they use long auger bits, and stay outside the joist and studs pockets and angle the bit in and don't worry about precision, since the wire is flexible and can go up or downhill. You can just poke the stud and pull the trigger in the general location you need to run the wire.

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OK, @77Ford what sort of deal did you get yours for? Also what do you see yourself using it for?

 

So if there is anything I've missed, I love a good informative discussion, tell me I'm wrong.

 

Also they must have been impressed by the Milwaukee corded hole hawg design to copy it hehehe .. This is the guy I used to use before I found the big hawg hole saws, always hated it:

miln1675-6.jpg

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I was going to buy a kitchen aid but maybe I'll get this instead, when I'm done roughing out some plumbing I can drop a paddle in and mix some cake batter, or is that dry wall mud, shit that kid isn't going to like his birthday cake...


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Haha Jimbo..

There are a lot of uses for this when building decks too I see, i asked a guy on IG what his uses are:

" I build decks and there are always random large holes I need to make in various materials. I use the Bosch daredevil auger bits for long holes. I'm about to drill though 7 inches of pressure treated lumber to put a 1/2 galvanized bolt through it all for a strong mechanical connection. I also use the 2 9/16 self feed bit for venting through blocks on the of houses. I do a lot of remodeling work there are always uses for big drills. "

 

it was a coincidence he put a picture up right when I was posting this thread:

 

 

..

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Yeah the market seems to be plumbers mainly, and electrical to a smaller degree. I've seen lots of hole hawgs and super hawgs on sites, and the old corded hole hawgs as well like you posted. I honestly think you're ahead of the curve/forward thinking using more efficient accessories in a nice standard drill knarlycarl. Most companies would rather sell you both those accessories and a $400 CAD drill. 

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41 minutes ago, jeffmcmillan said:

Not many people think through what tools they need as well as you knarlycarl.

Lol I tend to do that sometimes!

 

Here's an example of how impressive but impractical the drill(really the bit itself) is, 4" self feed bit:

..

This requires a lot of counter force on the drill as you see, but i think this drill would work better with a carbide tip hole saw (CTHS shall we say?). The main problem I have with this is just the bit really in this example. 

I would not want to drill this all day, and not even after a few holes ha. 

Need a carbide hole saw instead! 

 

What happens when you bottom out on a hole saw? I grab my hammer and use the claw to pry the plug until it snaps off from the rest of the wood and pull it out and keep going! I've done this many enough times to know I don't want to use a self feed bit for that. I let the CTHS do the work for me, with little counter force required to hold onto the drill.

 

Ridiculous power in the drill tho, hold onto it for dear life!!!

 

 

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Also of note is the e-clutch only works *most* of the time. You still need to work safely (no brainer, but I know some guys like to use gimmicks to replace common sense) and the S&J drill will still knock the teeth out of your head in 10% of those hairy situations lol. 

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I have no doubt timber workers can find a use for it. These are the guys who have chainsaw discs on their angle grinders we're talking about lol

 

Thats really disappointing about the clutch. These tools really need acceleration sensing like bosch drills. Seems like they have a patent though since its in half their tools and no one elses.

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17 hours ago, jeffmcmillan said:

Do I really need a 60V volt drill when a decade old budget level XRP drill can run a 4" spiral mixer in concrete on speed 2 or 6" spiral mixer on speed 1?

Same could be said about a car, computer, tv or 90% of any consumer product really.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
2 hours ago, Hugh Jass said:

Great review. Felt the number of holes was a poor comparison considering the difference in AH but I digress, looks impressive. 

I really want to see how it would do in a remodel situation where the studs are the old hard native oak lumber, that's some tough stuff to drill through

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51 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

I really want to see how it would do in a remodel situation where the studs are the old hard native oak lumber, that's some tough stuff to drill through

 

Given that thing has the power to run giant hole saws and 4in self feeds, I'd say it's got plenty of torque for any lumber for normal size bits as shown in that video. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I always think of Treehouse Masters whenever I see a stud drill.

The Nelson Treehouse and Supply crew on Animal Planet's Treehouse Masters use a corded one in every episode to install TABs (Treehouse Attachment Bolt).

I'm sure treehouse builders would like a cordless version since many treehouse constructions are in remote locations far from any outlet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treehouse_attachment_bolt

http://treehouses.com/joomla/index.php/construction/garnier-limb

http://treehouses.com/joomla/index.php/construction/garnier-limb-parts

https://store.beinatree.com/collections/treehouse-hardware

http://www.treehousesupplies.com/Treehouse_Bolts_s/41.htm

 

 

 

 

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