Jump to content

UWO vs in/lbs


Jronman

Recommended Posts

Would anyone like to explain what unit watts out is and what in/lbs is. Why does SB&D use UWO on their drills instead of in/lbs like other companies. Are there any key differences, advantages, disadvantages to using UWO? Should other companies switch there drills to UWO or stay with in/lbs?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

in-lb is the torque, typically hard torque which is how tight it's going to get something like a bottomed out bolt.  Soft torque is rarely specified but that's how hard it can realistically push while driving in something like a lag.

UWO stands for unit watts out which is the power.  That'll approximate how fast the tool will run when bogging down at a given torque.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dewalts round about way of making up stats so they sound fancy and can't compare to other companies, I remember at one point there is only a loosely mathematic something or other to convert to in lb of torque, maybe it's theoretical power some over paid engineer came up with


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

UWO is just the power generated (in watts) when the drill or whatever is going full tilt. Torque is a measure of the drills ability to turn an object, like a screw.

 

Using similar units, UWO is in Nm/s (Newton-metres per second) and torque is in Nm (Newton-metres). The reasoning from Dewalt is that looking at torque over time gives a more accurate description of a drill's potential than peak torque (which is, I think, what most torque listings tend to be; thank you Surge marketing materials).

 

This reasoning makes sense to me because you run a drill over a period of time rather than for an instant. Any engineers on the board might have a more informed opinion than I do about this.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

UWO is a unit of measurement used if one manufacture cannot beat another manufactures in*lbs rating;D

 

Kidding, jkeating3's response seems reasonable to me.

 

52 minutes ago, jkeating3 said:

UWO is just the power generated (in watts) when the drill or whatever is going full tilt. Torque is a measure of the drills ability to turn an object, like a screw.

 

Using similar units, UWO is in Nm/s (Newton-metres per second) and torque is in Nm (Newton-metres). The reasoning from Dewalt is that looking at torque over time gives a more accurate description of a drill's potential than peak torque (which is, I think, what most torque listings tend to be; thank you Surge marketing materials).

 

This reasoning makes sense to me because you run a drill over a period of time rather than for an instant. Any engineers on the board might have a more informed opinion than I do about this.

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 years later...

They just don’t want you to compare their product with another that’s what it comes down to.  so you have a hard time trying to figure out what the differences are. plain and simple. They can’t just come out with the same standards as everybody else. To me it’s like they’re trying to hide something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Member Statistics

    17,112
    Total Members
    6,555
    Most Online
    Filip
    Newest Member
    Filip
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...