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Makita DHR400 SDS Max Cordless X2 Rotary Hammer


kornomaniac

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It was already shown in australia/instagram with a few pictures and a small video a few months ago but now we have confirmed specifications:

 

Exact same stats as corded model HR4013C ( Which was chosen as best SDS Max in Toolboxbuzz SDS Max rotary comparison  http://www.toolboxbuzz.com/head-to-head/best-sds-rotary-hammer-drill-head-to-head-testing/    )

 

  • 8 Joules of hitting power:  gives it 30% more power then Dewalt and Milwaukee cordless SDS Max offerings.
  • Makita AVT for lowest vibrations in its class.  
  • AWS - Auto Wireless System : Get cordless Vacuum auto On/Off function withh upcoming Makita Vacs

 

 

 

dhr400.png

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looks amazing.  I won't be getting it just because i'm broke but I would still love to add it to my collection.

 

Kornomaniac,  any more scoops on the cordless nail guns?  I looked up the manual for the 16 gauge that you mentioned before.  It looks awesome.  Any idea when it's supposed to come out and if there is an 18 gauge close behind?  I'm saving my next purchase for that since it's what I need the most since selling my compressor.

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1 hour ago, danielicrazy said:

looks amazing.  I won't be getting it just because i'm broke but I would still love to add it to my collection.

 

Kornomaniac,  any more scoops on the cordless nail guns?  I looked up the manual for the 16 gauge that you mentioned before.  It looks awesome.  Any idea when it's supposed to come out and if there is an 18 gauge close behind?  I'm saving my next purchase for that since it's what I need the most since selling my compressor.

No idea. I'm Abit baffled why it hasn't been released yet.  Most of the times: when the manuals start to get translated and appear online  the tools follow rather close.

 

But that dbn600 manual has been out for 6 months or so but still be sign of the tool.

 

I'm gonna take a guess that because the DBN500 18gauge was a POS they're hopefully redesigning things ( I hope :P )

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/2/2017 at 7:14 AM, kornomaniac said:

Exact same stats as corded model HR4013C ( Which was chosen as best SDS Max in Toolboxbuzz SDS Max rotary comparison  http://www.toolboxbuzz.com/head-to-head/best-sds-rotary-hammer-drill-head-to-head-testing/    )

 

  • 8 Joules of hitting power:  gives it 30% more power then Dewalt and Milwaukee cordless SDS Max offerings.

 

That's not strictly true korno ;)

 

8 J @ 2900 BPM  is 21% more power than the Dewalt with 6.1 J @ 3150 BPM, even less over the FUEL specs, though the Dewalt is actually more powerful. We all know how misleading specs can be!

 

The Makita will likely be the hardest hitter for chipping.

 

 

 

 

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Specs can definitely be misleading... The Makita XRH05 is listed as having 3J of impact energy, and the DHR264 is listed as having 2.5J of impact energy, even when they are the same tool. I checked, even the spare parts numbers for the motor parts match.

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Im thinking its something similar to DeWalts "20V Max". 3J on fully charged batteries, 2.5J on average...

Edit: Alse the RPM and BPM are listed higher on XRH05... So im definitely thinking they are listing the best case scenario. When using the tool, you can definitely feel it slowing down a lot just before the low battery lights turn on.

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SDS max rotary hammers are not yet ready for batteries. And probably never will because of the large amount of torque they need.

Batteries can't even power the SDS plus ones.

I have the DHR243 and drilled two 18mm holes with a 3Ah battery. After the 1st hole the tool was struggling, and when it finished the 2nd hole, the battery was discharged.

Battery-powered rotary hammers are a joke compared to corded hammers. It's nice to be cordless, but not at the cost of having a useless tool. Same goes for angle-grinders, except those can be at least used to cut thin stuff, maybe even some _very_ light grinding.

People need to stop jumping in the cordless bandwagon just because of the hype, and without any thinking about the practical side.

I'd love to have all my tools cordless, but let's be honest, there's no battery technology that could make that feasible in the near future. Li-ion have serious limitations and they can not provide the large amount of power needed for 1000+ watt tools. Unless you build a battery with 10kg worth of cells, which is impractical. And all this with high drain cells, which die very fast compared to "normal" 500-cycle cells. That's probably why most tool batteries die so fast

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1 hour ago, kat said:

SDS max rotary hammers are not yet ready for batteries. And probably never will because of the large amount of torque they need.

Batteries can't even power the SDS plus ones.

I have the DHR243 and drilled two 18mm holes with a 3Ah battery. After the 1st hole the tool was struggling, and when it finished the 2nd hole, the battery was discharged.

Battery-powered rotary hammers are a joke compared to corded hammers. It's nice to be cordless, but not at the cost of having a useless tool. Same goes for angle-grinders, except those can be at least used to cut thin stuff, maybe even some _very_ light grinding.

People need to stop jumping in the cordless bandwagon just because of the hype, and without any thinking about the practical side.

I'd love to have all my tools cordless, but let's be honest, there's no battery technology that could make that feasible in the near future. Li-ion have serious limitations and they can not provide the large amount of power needed for 1000+ watt tools. Unless you build a battery with 10kg worth of cells, which is impractical. And all this with high drain cells, which die very fast compared to "normal" 500-cycle cells. That's probably why most tool batteries die so fast

 

If that's what you want to believe, go ahead. 

 

Maybe you'd want to retry your 18mm test with something else then a ancient drill design ( close to 6 years) and an ancient battery ( 8 year old ?), With a drill size actually within  the intended range of the drill you are using.

 

It willgive you a better perspective on things.

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5 hours ago, kat said:

SDS max rotary hammers are not yet ready for batteries. And probably never will because of the large amount of torque they need.

Batteries can't even power the SDS plus ones.

I have the DHR243 and drilled two 18mm holes with a 3Ah battery. After the 1st hole the tool was struggling, and when it finished the 2nd hole, the battery was discharged.

Battery-powered rotary hammers are a joke compared to corded hammers. It's nice to be cordless, but not at the cost of having a useless tool. Same goes for angle-grinders, except those can be at least used to cut thin stuff, maybe even some _very_ light grinding.

People need to stop jumping in the cordless bandwagon just because of the hype, and without any thinking about the practical side.

I'd love to have all my tools cordless, but let's be honest, there's no battery technology that could make that feasible in the near future. Li-ion have serious limitations and they can not provide the large amount of power needed for 1000+ watt tools. Unless you build a battery with 10kg worth of cells, which is impractical. And all this with high drain cells, which die very fast compared to "normal" 500-cycle cells. That's probably why most tool batteries die so fast

Hahaha you again.

 

Your comment show last your knowledge. What are you talking about ? An sds max isn’t ready for batteries ? 

 

I can run my dewalt 54v sds max all day no problem, drilling 1” hole x 180mm deep. I do have a fair batteries but, so that’s the limitation. I can run cordless grinders all day no problem 

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I too find it kind of funny saying current battery technology isn't there for these tools while using 3.0 batteries.  

 

Everyone uses tools for different applications.  If you're drilling large holes one after another all day yes a cordless probably isn't there yet.  But for the 95% of construction workers that aren't using them like that cordless are very capable of drilling large diameter holes and very convenient.

 

Same with grinders, there are very few people who couldn't find a cordless replacement if they wanted to.  I do millwright and ironwork and I no longer carry a corded grinder. 

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11 hours ago, kat said:

.

I have the DHR243 and drilled two 18mm holes with a 3Ah battery. After the 1st hole the tool was struggling, and when it finished the 2nd hole, the battery was discharged.

 

 

And you also seem to be full of shit with your 2 holes. Freshly drilled. Last hole was halfway

IMG_20171116_084204.jpg

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Why so aggressive? I'm just stating facts, or at least my views based on my experience.

kornomaniac: I'm not full of shit, that's what happened. If you managed to get 7 holes, good for you, but take into account that I drilled my holes in my house to get 2 pipes through them, not in some test plate. 

 

It seems to be that most of these new cordless tools are marketed towards hobbyists, and not professionals. And it's pretty obvious why: hobbyists are very enthusiastic about new technologies and they often use emotions when making decisions.  Perfect customers :)

Professional on the other hand, don't care about tech, they simply want a tool to do its job, so the only things that matter to them are real-world performance (not the paper specs or irrelevant results from youtube review videos) and costs-to-performance ratio. I don't live in the US, so I don't know what professionals use right now there, but in Europe "heavy" cordless tools are rarely present on job sites. And for a good reason: they are unable to perform nearly as well as corded tools. 

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Well you are staying facts based on your ( as it seems from your replies ) very limited knowledge on what exists in cordless tools and what the possibilities are.  

 

Your 18mm drill example was a good example. 6 year old tech with a bit size higher then the intended use. So the problem is more with your expectations of 6 year old tech. 6 year kinda means ancient on terms of cordless powertool.

 

If you would have done your 18mm drilling with say, a higher end milwaukee SDS or the flexvolt SDS your experience would have been alot better. Because those are new tools with high capacity batteries which have gone a long way since Makita introduced their dhr243 in 2012 :)

 

You can complain that Makita should get a move on and update their cordless SDS and you are totally right :D

 

I don't know what part of Europe you live in but in Belgium ( I'm a Makita/Bosch/Festool dealer myself in Bree, Belgium ) cordless tools outsell corded for the professionals.  

 

It's hobbyist who, most of the time, do not want to pay the extra for the cordless option. It's the pros who kinda hate the cords that buy cordless gear. 

 

Even more important: people ( also pros ) have to be informed about a tools capacity. If someone comes into my store and needs to drill 18mm holes  I will never ever present him the dhr243. That's not the right tool for the job. An occasional hole now and then, sure. But that's the max.

 

The newer 9 inch grinder Makita makes.( 2000 watt mind you ). It's a very powerfull tool with a small runtime. That doesn't make it usefull for everyone but there are also ALOT of tradies who need a grinder this size now and then. For them the cordless 9 inch option is an excellent idea. I've not had any negative remarks on the 9" grinder yet because all the people I have sold it to know what to expect in the runtime department.

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FYI the  x2 Makita drill was listed as both 2.5 J and 3.0 J on the Australian website until recently. I questioned them on it, and they changed it to be 2.5 J. They said the discrepancy was the difference between how they rated it internally, and the standardised (international?) way of rating impact.

 

I think that cordless SDS drills are awesome, and can be just as powerful as their counterparts. But I do concede that they suck the juice, so you need a fair arsenal of batteries if you want to use them continuously. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, dwain said:

FYI the  x2 Makita drill was listed as both 2.5 J and 3.0 J on the Australian website until recently. I questioned them on it, and they changed it to be 2.5 J. They said the discrepancy was the difference between how they rated it internally, and the standardised (international?) way of rating impact.

 

I think that cordless SDS drills are awesome, and can be just as powerful as their counterparts. But I do concede that they suck the juice, so you need a fair arsenal of batteries if you want to use them continuously. 

 

Yea, you need atleast 6 batteries and two twin chargers to keep the Makita 18v x2 rotary hammer going on all day while removing tiles... 8 batteries would be even better. Been there, done that. My boss was skeptic about it, and insisted that I take a company corded Bosch with me as backup. Didn't take it out of the case. I was using 8 5Ah batteries. 

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59 minutes ago, aessu said:

Yea, you need atleast 6 batteries and two twin chargers to keep the Makita 18v x2 rotary hammer going on all day while removing tiles... 8 batteries would be even better. Been there, done that. My boss was skeptic about it, and insisted that I take a company corded Bosch with me as backup. Didn't take it out of the case. I was using 8 5Ah batteries. 

And we'll that also an ancient inefficient drill :) a more modern drill would have done better :D

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2 hours ago, dwain said:

FYI the  x2 Makita drill was listed as both 2.5 J and 3.0 J on the Australian website until recently. I questioned them on it, and they changed it to be 2.5 J. They said the discrepancy was the difference between how they rated it internally, and the standardised (international?) way of rating impact.

 

 

 

 

Hehe sounds familiar. I've corrected many mistakes on the Belgium Makita website :D

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Hi @kat..I can understand your point and the points made after your comment. I’m a framer in the USA, east coast. I can say unequivocally that cordless tools are ready and in some cases have more power and perform better then there corded counterpart. Runtime is a concern, so anyone embarking on a cordless platform knows that multiple batteries are a must.and the best blades for the job...

      ...The problems with tripped breakers and a fight for outlets or no power at all ,lends itself to the use of cordless tools. The convenience and safety factors outway any down side to cordless tools,  at least for our companies.  Makita makes some great cordless tools, very innovative company. I’m a Dewalt guy, but thought I’d chime in on the performance of cordless tools...Best of luck...

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I have to wonder who thinks 3ah batteries are the best choice for a rotary hammer. I wonder more so who gets off on rubbishing the performance. 

 

It's like you expect it to perform brilliantly but when it doesn't you exaggerate your claim anyway. Lol. 

 

I use 5 or 6ah batteries with mine. I'd still like a larger capacity but I can get a couple of days out of a 6 with pretty constant use and running the vacuum attachment. 

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