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Milwaukee M18 Battery Run Times


olletsocmit

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I have seen a lot of posts on here about run time and what kind of battery people use. I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread & break down the runtime for every single Milwaukee M18 battery they make...

 

• 1.5 -

• 2.0 -

• 4.0 -

• 5.0 -

• 6.0 -

• 9.0 -

 

 

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2 hours ago, olletsocmit said:


Good point... I forgot about that. How does Milwaukee gauge battery run time? Do they give the run time per tool or just average it out?

I guess a good tool to use for this purpose is the M18 Fuel impact driver, since almost all of us use it.


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It’s definitely gauged per tool, because a 9.0ah battery will pretty much run forever on my brad nailer, but my leaf blower will eat it up in no time. There are a ton of run time, torture test videos on YouTube, but they usually just show 1 battery. At best, they might compare 2 batteries. Since everyone uses their tools differently, I’m not sure its useful enough for someone to put in all the effort to do all those tests.

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9 hours ago, Daniel Julian said:

It’s definitely gauged per tool, because a 9.0ah battery will pretty much run forever on my brad nailer, but my leaf blower will eat it up in no time. There are a ton of run time, torture test videos on YouTube, but they usually just show 1 battery. At best, they might compare 2 batteries. Since everyone uses their tools differently, I’m not sure its useful enough for someone to put in all the effort to do all those tests.

 

True, battery life will vary by user and tool to such an extent where accurate data is probably not worth gathering.  A drill may last x-number of hours in testing, but unless that test subjects the drill and battery to torture-like conditions, is the data going to be factual?  If the test is severe, will the data be completely truthful to real-world application?  The average consumer will likely look at the resulting marketing claims and might go for overkill.  "I have to assemble this furniture now and want a battery that will last all day.  Let's see, whoa, the little battery only lasted an hour in testing but the big one lasted six hours.  Gotta get the big one."  Hours later: "This battery is better than they claimed, but it sure is getting heavy, maybe I'll use that small one after all."  When that consumer realizes that his small battery was enough all along, he might consider the data as skewed to lure unsuspecting casual users into buying $100-plus batteries they don't need.

 

Cordless power tool usage, by its very nature, is about as subjective a subject as possible.  Even people who use tools side by side for the same purpose will probably find that they prefer different tools and batteries.  

 

Suffice to say, I'm glad we're at a point where we can even bring up run time as it relates to batteries.  Only a few years ago 3.0Ah batteries were the "high capacity" packs, and just before that 1.3Ah and 2.6Ah were about all we got.  

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