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Fan cooling on fast charger DCB118


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The 20V battery packs don't seem to have air inlets like Metabo batteries.

 

Does anyone know if the fan cooling on the yellow fast charger is actually effective on the 20V packs? 

 

Is it simply cooling the battery from the outside?

 

Or, do the gaps around the terminals and release clip allow air flow into the pack? 

 

 

Any info would be great. 

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I'm sure it was AvE who tore down a yellow fast charger and found a cowling inside that directed the air to the battery. Not convinced it's necessary as lithium cells will cool on their own whilst charging, unless they're being charged at a very high rate, a rate that's higher than their stated capacity. 

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I'm sure it was AvE who tore down a yellow fast charger and found a cowling inside that directed the air to the battery. Not convinced it's necessary as lithium cells will cool on their own whilst charging, unless they're being charged at a very high rate, a rate that's higher than their stated capacity. 

Guys will also tend to throw a freshly drained battery on to the charger. The cooling helps bring those battery temps down.

Rapid charging does produce heat, cooling allows for faster charge times. Lithium batteries will not “cool themselves” when you rapid charge.


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14 hours ago, HiltiWpg said:


Guys will also tend to throw a freshly drained battery on to the charger. The cooling helps bring those battery temps down.

Rapid charging does produce heat, cooling allows for faster charge times. Lithium batteries will not “cool themselves” when you rapid charge.


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Ah, yeah, I was referring to a charge rate of 1C. So a 2 Amp pack being charged at 2 Amps, not ramped hard at 4 Amps which is 2C. 

 

A 1C charge rate will allow the cells to cool naturally during charging. 

 

I should've made myself clearer. 

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It is indeed a bit sad that tool manufacturers don't offer real fast charging. With those Powertool cells you could go 3C or something if you would care a little about cooling. Especially if the battery was used before. If i got that right it uses the piece where the lock is to suck/blow air through the battery. Could be wrong, never seen the "fast"-charger (8 amps) in person.

 

I would personally even think about active cooling with a peltier cooler or something. Then 16amp charging or something, limited to 3C or there about. That would be a real fast charger. Seems nobody really cares too much, and you can have more batteries as well as solution...

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I don't know which battery you are referring to, but I don't know any coming soon...

 

I heard some excitement about Li-Ion batteries with solid electrolyte, which are expected to come to market in the mid 20s. I don't want to dampen your enthusiasm, and we certainly don't really know the exact specifications but I don't think powertool will be one of the early uses of any solid electrolyte batteries (lately marketed as "solid state"). Solids are not that good at conducting ions so fast charging and high power are not their principal strengths. The mayor advantage will be energy density and safety, so phones or electric cars will be the first examples that come to mind. With Li metal negative electrode material (which is enabled by the solid electrolyte) you of course don't have problems with lithium plating because It's what you do in this case and lithium plating is limiting the charging of today's Li-Ion batteries. But if the internal resistance of the electrolyte is kinda high you would just heat up your battery and don't charge it much. If you read specs about solid electrolyte cells in research they never mention power output or charge times when comparing them to "todays technology" and 5min charging claims don't have traceable sources behind them.

I am excited for anything regarding batteries, don't get me wrong, just don't know when this technology is ready for powertool use ;)

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@Jronman...that’s a tuff source to use. Those guys wouldn’t know which end of a tool to use without a cue card to read. ...they are bought and paid for to the highest bidder....AVE would probably know what’s next in battery power, he’s an interesting, intelligent guy, lots of practical knowledge “street smarts” which I’d take over “book smarts” any day..............I’m just waiting for a 12ah the same size as a 9ah Flexvolt battery..that would solve runtime issues with these high volt tools we use daily..

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