Jump to content

Where do Dewalt Mechanic Tools rank?


elMaestro

Recommended Posts

Where is does Dewalt stand regarding mechanic tool sets? Above or below Husky? Stanley? Any and all help will be appreciated.


Are you trolling?

Stanley Black and Decker owns the Dewalt brand and brands their premium tools with it. By definition it is going to be a bit better than Stanley. The exception might be they have made a name for the Fatmax tape measure brand as a premium. It is sold as a cheap brand so it is positioned to be somewhere at the bottom end such as tools made for distribution by Walmart. SBD has other brands but currently they are marketing Craftsman as their mid grade. Husky is the HD house brand just like Kobalt is the Lowe’s house brand. The various tools are made by various companies and HD occasionally rotates manufacturers. So it’s a bit of a crap shoot but usually similar to the Craftsman brand but positioned to siphon off a few dollars of SBD royalty money.

There is a list of “who owns who” on the toolguyd web site that explains the relations of Chervon , TTI, SBD, Snapon, etc. It’s easy to compare tools made by the same company. They don’t hide their good/better/best. It’s much harder to compare say Dewalt to Milwaukee. For instance years ago SBD sold a great impact screwdriver set under the Stanley name then discontinued it. In the last couple years it reappeared branded Dewalt. Recently Milwaukee offered a set for a couple more bucks and I like it even better. These are good for two things. First if you have a rusty or stripped screw hit the screwdriver with a hammer to knock the rust off and cut new slots. Second they are good as beater screwdrivers...you know doing things with them that you are not supposed to do to screwdrivers like pry bars. Milwaukee has better tips. But both are pretty good and much better than a lot of what’s out there.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for taking out the time to explain. I was definitely not trolling. LOL. I was looking at three different mechanic sets that were about evenly priced and I was trying to go with the one that is of the best quality.  They are the Husky 230-piece Mechanic (H230MTS0) Tool Set  from Home Depot, the Stanley 201-piece Black Chrome Mechanic (STMT75402W) Tool Set from Walmart on clearance, and the Dewalt 173-piece Mechanic (DWMT41019) Tool Set from Costco. Quality-wise, which would you stick with?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

SBD sells Stanley as a “budget” brand and Dewalt as “premium”. Husky is also “budget”. First can you return broken ones for replacement? You can even return Harbor Freight tools. If not, skip it. I know you can return Husky and Dewalt. Not sure on Stanley.

I’ll add more. First don’t ignore Harbor Freight or Northern. HF used to be Chinese junk. It’s fairly respectable now. Northern is “rich rednecks”. So just not HF, Lowe’s carries Craftsman which is another Stanley/Dewalt brand positioned midway between them. Husky is partly made by SBD, too. Let’s not forget Neiko and Tekton which are essentially Amazon house brands. I’d say they are midrange too. No issues with them either.

You can save money on “sets” but they often give you a lot of poor quality tools in a set so skip these. Sorry that’s just how it is. Plus you get that stupid giant blow molded box that takes up tons of space and is utter garbage.

Second here is the problem. You can never have enough tools. You will always run into some strange fastener or special situation. Start small with say just a good 3/8” socket set, an adjustable wrench, some screw drivers. Then as you get comfortable and need more, get more. Set a monthly budget. Put a running list on your phone. As you run into situations add things to your list. Then you can shop around and get a little at a time. You save money buying quality and getting just what you need, not a bunch of crappy tools and oddball bits you never use.

Buy six point sockets. 12 points are easier to get on but on bad/stripped nuts six point sockets grip better. This separates a lot of cheap tools from cheap but good quality. Next we have the laser/painted/etched vs stamped question on the labels. If you can get it go with stamped but this is rare. ALL other options no matter what they say come right off if the socket runs on something. They talk up their laser etched stuff but none of my high end socket labels that are not stamped are visible after six months.’Finally impact vs nonimpact. Nonimpact sockets are thinner and get in tight spaces better. Impact sockets are almost indestructible. If you ever intend on getting an impact wrench just buy the impact sockets and adapters now. They will be black oxide, ugly as sin, and tough as nails. So very good for what they are meant for.

In terms of ratchets this is the money spot. Shop around. Try them out. Look at the size of the head (thinner is better but raises price). Swivels can be nice but may make it harder to use. Extending handles are nice. There are dual head 3/8 & 1/4” heads. Handy. I have one. It does bulk it up though. Also get at least one breaker bar, longer is better. Get it I the biggest size sockets you use. You can always adapter down. Get an extension assortment. Ratcheting is nice...basically makes it a ratchet. Everything is interchangeable so maybe buy them all separate. Usually the ratchets that come in sets are crap. Sorry that’s just how it is.

In wrenches you want combination wrenches unless you have some special needs. It’s more expensive but get ratcheting box ends now and thank me later. You will be glad you did. One of the interesting sets if you want to explore is Klein and Harbor Freight make double box end wrenches where just 4-5 have most sizes. Gearwrench is an American (Apex Tool Group) brand, mostly American made. While you are at it Crescent is a sister company/brand and makes great adjustable wrenches and pliers.

Between the above three you can easily stay under $150 and have good quality stuff. Buy socket strips at HD and buy a tool box. On the wrenches I love a wrench roll. The Dickies brand one is really nice. I have both sizes but I only use the large. It holds all my wrenches SAE and metric with room to spare. In terms of tool boxes/bags I do electrical work so I have the electrician open top 12x12 bag. Fully loaded it’s almost uncomfortable to carry. Those giant 24” mechanics bags are insane. I have one strictly for my 1” to 2” wrenches. The sockets all fit in two Dewalt medium Toughsystem boxes. One for 1/4 and 3/8, one for 1/2” with impact wrenches in each plus a lot of adapters, Tory bits, hex bits, etc. Electrical service work requires an insane amount of tools, more than mechanics. We just don’t need as many really large tools.

In screwdrivers they sell these huge sets but the reality is you need one 1/4” or 3/8” “beater” (Milwaukee or Dewalt impact is better), one 1/4” flat blade decent length, a good length #2 Phillips, maybe stubbies but a small specialty one is better, and a set of “precision” screwdrivers. Hardened tips can’t be beat so this is where Wiha, Milwaukee, Dewalt are all you need to look at. Harbor Freight has some good ones too. Get one of those Allen (hex) sets too. There are excellent and American made ones.

Then there are regular, needle nose and maybe lineman’s pliers and diagonals. Again Crescent is a good name and reasonably priced without going German.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 6/5/2020 at 4:14 AM, paulengr said:

SBD sells Stanley as a “budget” brand and Dewalt as “premium”. Husky is also “budget”. First can you return broken ones for replacement? You can even return Harbor Freight tools. If not, skip it. I know you can return Husky and Dewalt. Not sure on Stanley.

I’ll add more. First don’t ignore Harbor Freight or Northern. HF used to be Chinese junk. It’s fairly respectable now. Northern is “rich rednecks”. So just not HF, Lowe’s carries Craftsman which is another Stanley/Dewalt brand positioned midway between them. Husky is partly made by SBD, too. Let’s not forget Neiko and Tekton which are essentially Amazon house brands. I’d say they are midrange too. No issues with them either.

You can save money on “sets” but they often give you a lot of poor quality tools in a set so skip these. Sorry that’s just how it is. Plus you get that stupid giant blow molded box that takes up tons of space and is utter garbage.

Second here is the problem. You can never have enough tools. You will always run into some strange fastener or special situation. Start small with say just a good 3/8” socket set, an adjustable wrench, some screw drivers. Then as you get comfortable and need more, get more. Set a monthly budget. Put a running list on your phone. As you run into situations add things to your list. Then you can shop around and get a little at a time. You save money buying quality and getting just what you need, not a bunch of crappy tools and oddball bits you never use.

Buy six point sockets. 12 points are easier to get on but on bad/stripped nuts six point sockets grip better. This separates a lot of cheap tools from cheap but good quality. Next we have the laser/painted/etched vs stamped question on the labels. If you can get it go with stamped but this is rare. ALL other options no matter what they say come right off if the socket runs on something. They talk up their laser etched stuff but none of my high end socket labels that are not stamped are visible after six months.’Finally impact vs nonimpact. Nonimpact sockets are thinner and get in tight spaces better. Impact sockets are almost indestructible. If you ever intend on getting an impact wrench just buy the impact sockets and adapters now. They will be black oxide, ugly as sin, and tough as nails. So very good for what they are meant for.

In terms of ratchets this is the money spot. Shop around. Try them out. Look at the size of the head (thinner is better but raises price). Swivels can be nice but may make it harder to use. Extending handles are nice. There are dual head 3/8 & 1/4” heads. Handy. I have one. It does bulk it up though. Also get at least one breaker bar, longer is better. Get it I the biggest size sockets you use. You can always adapter down. Get an extension assortment. Ratcheting is nice...basically makes it a ratchet. Everything is interchangeable so maybe buy them all separate. Usually the ratchets that come in sets are crap. Sorry that’s just how it is.

In wrenches you want combination wrenches unless you have some special needs. It’s more expensive but get ratcheting box ends now and thank me later. You will be glad you did. One of the interesting sets if you want to explore is Klein and Harbor Freight make double box end wrenches where just 4-5 have most sizes. Gearwrench is an American (Apex Tool Group) brand, mostly American made. While you are at it Crescent is a sister company/brand and makes great adjustable wrenches and pliers.

Between the above three you can easily stay under $150 and have good quality stuff. Buy socket strips at HD and buy a tool box. On the wrenches I love a wrench roll. The Dickies brand one is really nice. I have both sizes but I only use the large. It holds all my wrenches SAE and metric with room to spare. In terms of tool boxes/bags I do electrical work so I have the electrician open top 12x12 bag. Fully loaded it’s almost uncomfortable to carry. Those giant 24” mechanics bags are insane. I have one strictly for my 1” to 2” wrenches. The sockets all fit in two Dewalt medium Toughsystem boxes. One for 1/4 and 3/8, one for 1/2” with impact wrenches in each plus a lot of adapters, Tory bits, hex bits, etc. Electrical service work requires an insane amount of tools, more than mechanics. We just don’t need as many really large tools.

In screwdrivers they sell these huge sets but the reality is you need one 1/4” or 3/8” “beater” (Milwaukee or Dewalt impact is better), one 1/4” flat blade decent length, a good length #2 Phillips, maybe stubbies but a small specialty one is better, and a set of “precision” screwdrivers. Hardened tips can’t be beat so this is where Wiha, Milwaukee, Dewalt are all you need to look at. Harbor Freight has some good ones too. Get one of those Allen (hex) sets too. There are excellent and American made ones.

Then there are regular, needle nose and maybe lineman’s pliers and diagonals. Again Crescent is a good name and reasonably priced without going German.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

last i checked, TightSpot had a longer warranty.

 

TightSpot makes tools for everyone from the housewife who hangs pictures all the way up to the heavy industrial/commercial construction workers

 

TightSpot is mostly light duty stuff. just fine for around the house on occasion, but not the kind of thing you want to make your living with everyday. commercial and industrial pros use milwaukee, dewalt, hilti, and bosch.

 

if its just for occasional hobby use, the makita is fine.

 

if your have to depend on a drill on a regular basis, get the milwaukee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Member Statistics

    17,435
    Total Members
    6,555
    Most Online
    JoeF
    Newest Member
    JoeF
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...