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Craftsman Air Compressor Model No. 919.184191


michaelj7

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I am trying to locate a new pump for my Craftsman Air Compressor Model No. 919.184191

In doing so, I found the current pump Part No. Z-D22624 was manufactured by Devilbiss.

The pump has since been discontinued, and they said they do not make a replacement.

I am trying to find out if there is a pump from another manufacturer that would work with

this motor and tank.

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I would call Sears and see what they say.  They have to have someone know something about their parts and what would work.

That’s how they used to be. Not anymore.

If there is a local tool repair shop try there. The old guys know that brand X compressor fits on certain tools.

But don’t get your hopes up. You might spend more time and money fixing it than new. The compressor is the money. Motors and tanks are cheap. Often the tool repair shop has some factory refurbished stuff though that is cheaper than full retail...or not. Be careful before you walk in the door that you know what a new one costs. Some will charge for repair even if it costs more than new or overcharge on a refurbished one.
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On 6/16/2020 at 11:03 AM, Eric - TIA said:

I would call Sears and see what they say.  They have to have someone know something about their parts and what would work.

Tried that, seems like they couldn’t even figure out the time of day.  Sears has gone so far down hill it amazes me...I remember when it was the go to place for just about everything.

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  • 1 year later...
  • 4 months later...

I am also looking for the same compressor (919.184191). What did anyone find on replacing this unit. If I cannot find a suitable replacement, I will tear it down but the lack of available parts makes me think it might not be worth it. Mine is very noisy, like it needs new bearing(s). Don't know if anything else is needed.

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As an update, this unit uses a Devilbiss D22624 as previously noted by Michaelj7. After a lot of searching, I found you can get pretty much everything needed for a rebuild on EBay (connecting rods, gaskets, reed valves, ring sets). Just put D22624 in the search and check the box for a detailed search. The rods don't have separate bearings, so if worn they need to be replaced. I have to tear mine down to see exactly what is needed but at least now I see how to get the key parts for this model.

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  • 1 month later...

I have a further update to provide on this thread. I just finished successfully rebuilding my Craftsman #919.184191  (Devilbiss D22624) compressor and it now runs quietly and smoothly like new. I tore it down and found that one of the rod caps had the bolts back out and that was causing the rod knock. Fortunately, I didn't let it run to destruction. The crankshaft journal had some rough wear on that one side and there was no wear on the other one. I opted to replace both rods. One journal had some wear. The other journal had no wear. I contacted "ALLPARTS Equipment and Accessories, Inc. at 269-685-4123 (web site www.allpartsinc.com) and ordered a full gasket set, 2 rods, and new reed valves. Total cost with tax and shipping was about $100.00. I did not replace the rings because ALLPARTS said that ring wear was not an issue usually and my cylinder walls were good and showed no wear either. The rods are #265-410. Gasket set is #K-0159. Reed valves are #KK-4275. The torque values are in the Sears manual, but I noticed an error in the table of values. The torque for the screws for the reed valves should say "in-lbs" instead of "ft-lbs". To install the pistons on the new rods, the piston pin pushes out easily by hand (unlike automotive piston pins) without the need to use a press. I marked both rod caps before installation to make sure I oriented them the same way they were manufactured. I used emory cloth with oil to burnish the roughness on the crankshaft journals. The worst journal ended up with .016" of additional clearance (no concern). The technician at ALLPARTS (Jake) was very helpful. I decided not to replace the crankshaft bearings because there was no discernible wear/movement on them. The hardest part of the rebuild was probably just getting the old gasket material fully off the parts. By the way, you can re-use the reed valves by cleaning them and re-installing them upside down if you want. I opted for new ones because they are not expensive and if I was going to the trouble of rebuilding, I wanted to have new ones. I hope this helps others. If you are considering rebuilding yours - go for it!

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