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HOLY TORQUE


firefighter4187

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Don't know who would need that kinda torque outside a truck trailer shop and a industrial setting but awesome if your in that trade... It's there if you need it but for a home owner, your gonna break bolts lol working on all my vehicles I never needed over let's say like 400 but only needed that for really badly rusted bolts on old vehicles

I'm going to order the Dewalt really soon for working on my stuff because my corded is getting run down and weak

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Don't know who would need that kinda torque outside a truck trailer shop and a industrial setting but awesome if your in that trade... It's there if you need it but for a home owner, your gonna break bolts lol working on all my vehicles I never needed over let's say like 400 but only needed that for really badly rusted bolts on old vehicles

I'm going to order the Dewalt really soon for working on my stuff because my corded is getting run down and weak

Read the article, They are having a drive control feature, Mode 1 is up to is for when over torqueing is concerned, up to 375ft pounds, mode 2 is for full power when breaking loose bolts and drilling augers. That takes care of the "breaking bolt" problem...

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That's impressive, but the IR W7150 is putting out over 1000 ft. lbs. I'd be lying if I said I wasn't a little disappointed.

Lol, I cant wait and see the day NASCAR pit crews start using cordless! It would solve the cord getting caught problem....Maybe this will allow them to do it!

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A lot of harmonic balancer and suspension bolts require big torque to bust loose. 400 ft. lbs. isn't going to cut it. For lug nuts and stuff you can get by with about anything as most lugs only call for 90-100 ft. lbs. and some are less than that. You don't need that much tightening torque, but you can never have too much breakaway torque.

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A lot of harmonic balancer and suspension bolts require big torque to bust loose. 400 ft. lbs. isn't going to cut it. For lug nuts and stuff you can get by with about anything as most lugs only call for 90-100 ft. lbs. and some are less than that. You don't need that much tightening torque, but you can never have too much breakaway torque.

couldnt agree more, thats exactly what that peak 750 is made for.
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Lol, I cant wait and see the day NASCAR pit crews start using cordless! It would solve the cord getting caught problem....Maybe this will allow them to do it!

It would be interesting to see if they would go cordless.  I talked with the guy from IR.  He told me they supply all the impacts for the races.  They even have a trailer that follows the races around so the pit guys can always visit the trailers to make changes.  I guess they don't sell these impacts to the public because they are designed just for the races.  They are designed strictly for performance and not to last a long time.

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It would be interesting to see if they would go cordless. I talked with the guy from IR. He told me they supply all the impacts for the races. They even have a trailer that follows the races around so the pit guys can always visit the trailers to make changes. I guess they don't sell these impacts to the public because they are designed just for the races. They are designed strictly for performance and not to last a long time.

That pretty interesting

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My local mechanic where I worked for a little while uses a snap on Jun, only has about 500 ft lbs and it's worn out and you don't really come across much that the gun can't handle... My GMC Sierra I changed rear shocks and did a front leveling kit myself with my old corded gun and never had much trouble... High torque can and will break bolts, always better off cracking loose big bolts with a breaker bar taking your time then going full tilt with a big gun at full torque... Saves many headaches

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Far as cordless it might be along time before you see them in nascar, the IR gun they use has lots of torque but it's the speed at which it spins which is very high over 10000rpm... IR sells the thunder gun which is something like they use in pits but it's far from the real thing

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Professional mechanics will be the first ones to tell you you can't have enough breakaway torque. There are contrasting theories on the effects of using impact extensions, but the generally accepted theory is that they do rob some torque. We've seen most all manufacturers gravitate toward super powered impacts. IR, Aircat, Proto, and about everyone else is shooting for 1,000+ ft. lbs. When it comes to tools, demand dictates supply.

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Well I know my mechanic that does some work when I can't is very happy with his guns and has never upgraded because they are right about at the right level to what most automotive needs are... Any more and you start running the risk of breaking bolts... He'd rather use a breaker bar first for that reason... I took auto tech as my trade and know a lot in the trade and many don't use huge guns...

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After reading up a little on the new Milwaukee's it appears they have up to 1100 ft. lbs. of breakaway torque. They have 2 forward settings and I assume the middle number is reverse. They spec out as follows:

1/2" pin: 600/900/350 ft-lbs

1/2" ring: 700/1100/100 ft-lbs

3/4" ring: 750/1200/375 ft-lbs

7/16" hex: 500/500/300 ft-lbs

I feel a lot better about them now. Use whatever you want, but I'll take all the breakaway torque I can get. The impact is only going to exert the force it needs to bust the nut/bolt anyway. It isn't like it's instantly slamming it with 1,000 ft. lbs. if it doesn't have to. If a bolt requires the full power of a 500 ft. lb. impact to remove, you aren't busting

it with a breaker bar anyway.

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We're talking about cordless guns here. They have a variable speed trigger that allows the operator to limit the speed at which the anvil is turning. Since torque is related to the velocity, it's relatively easy for you to limit the amount of torque the impact is using.

In applying a fastener, if you put a screw in until the gun impacts the first time, then apply another until it has impacted 10 times, the 2 bolts will not be torqued to the same number.

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