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I know most people don't care for too much government regulation.


DR99

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Worksafebc has a really good youtube channel about keeping safe on the workplace, and the consequences of not following them. Plus they have jobs I would never consider doing timber felling and wooden shake manufacturing holy crap that's some crazy stuff way too many sawblades turning around you

http://www.youtube.com/user/WorkSafeBC

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Well I suppose it's a matter of perspective. When I was a meat cutter I knew a kid that got his arm pulled into a meat grinder he was cleaning, because he didn't disconnect the power. A woman I trained moved to another store. She never listened well when I told her to use her chain mail gloves, they made her hands cold. She cut off three fingers on the band saw. The guy I replaced damn near dide from blood poisoning. He sent a knife through his hand while steeling his knife, he closed the wound with super glue.

When I logged there was a greenhorn on a different crew that got killed because he was standing too close to a turn and hit in the back of the head. And an acquaintance helo logger just died when his chopper went down.

I used to work at a cedar shake and shingle mill during spring brake-up. They hadn't had any accidents in 10 years. I didn't know of anybody that got hurt running a chain saw, except me, I lost my shoulder pad and threw a hot saw on my shoulder and melted my suspenders to my shoulder.

Most of the accidents in the timber industry are crushings, degloving, or the old chippers.

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I only got to make a couple of bundles of shingles. I was much too slow. The sawyer was so fast at it he made it look like I was standing still. Mostly I ran the wheel loader unloading trucks, bundling, or cutting blocks for the hand hewers.

Now those guys had some skill. It was neat watching them with their froes and draw knives making the high end hand hewn shingles and shakes.

Yeah that was Bart. I met him at a logging show a few years back. He had a presence about him that you automatically respected him. He seemed like a pretty cool guy.

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Proper usage and safety training are often over looked. I know it sounds kinda shop teacherish, but you definitely have to have a healthy respect for the tools and how easily they can eff us up. Our soft bodies are no match for hardened steel.

Plus us guys are macho showoffs that so often know everything as if it is embedded in our DNA. We don't need instruction or safety equipment. (Tim the Tool Man grunt)

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I have a close friend that is a Union Stagehand. He got into it years ago and picked it back up after he retired. He enjoys it. Sounds like a fun line of work.

Cool! There's a lot of great reasons to get into theatre. Especially for those stage hands. It can be a really laid back AND interesting gig.

 

 

Building sets however......can be a total mess of miscommunication and bad ideas (yet rewarding at the end of the day)

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I high school we built a couple small sets and enjoyed it.  

It's interesting, I meet a lot of adults (especially women) who's main (and often only) introduction to tools and carpentry was from the drama program they took in university.

 

Even me, I took shop in high school but it was taught so poorly that I didn't learn a thing or even finish a project. But when I got to university, you couldn't get me out of the carp shop.

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my regret is that I didn't do what you were doing

I had a blast in school. To this day when I run into people from school and tell them how I've turned out they have a look of shock on their face.

I didn't miss too many parties, but I knew when it was time to grow up.

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  • 5 months later...

My old man was a cop so the drinking and pot was pretty much off the table. But, chasing a skirt or two was, as they say, a whole 'nother story!

Yeah, that was the other thing. My dad was a Federal parole officer with a lot of clients who were druggies. I do wish I would have drank a little in HS, though I made up for it in the 18-20 years....

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