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Hilti TE 4-A18 vs. DeWalt DCH213


Moze

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I'm not sure how long of a comparison this will turn into, but I figured it would be best to start a dedicated thread. 

 

This will be to compare the Hilti TE 4-A18 and the DeWalt DCH213 cordless SDS rotary hammers. Primary use is for drilling 3/16" x 2½" (±) holes in concrete & masonry with occasional ½" x 3" holes for concrete anchors.

 

 

06.15.12: 

 

Purchased DeWalt 20v Max DCH213 Cordless SDS Rotary Hammer with to 20v Max 3.0Ah batteries.

 

I've drilled a few thousand 3/16" holes over a year and a half without issue. Zero complaints.

 

 

01.17.14: 

 

Purchased Hilti TE 4-A18 Cordless SDS Rotary Hammer with two 21.6v 2.6Ah batteries.

 

 

Immediate thoughts when comparing the two tools:

 

Weight: 

 

If holding with one hand, the tool is noticeably nose-heavy compared to the DeWalt. This likely won't be an issue because once drilling, the front is supported by the bit anyway. The DeWalt weighs in at 7.0 pounds with the 3.0Ah battery. The Hilti weighs in at 7.6 pound with the 2.6Ah battery.

 

Size: 

 

The size is virtually identical. The Hilti is approximately ¾" longer and the battery and the body/battery area is noticeably thicker.

 

Features: 

 

The DeWalt has a hammer/chisel-only mode, the Hilti doesn't.

 

The DeWalt has an LED light, the Hilti doesn't.

 

The forward/reverse switch on the Hilti is much easier to access and operate than the DeWalt. The switch on the Hilti is directly above the trigger with no obstructions and is about twice the length of the DeWalt. The DeWalt has a 'ledge' between the trigger and the switch that makes it difficult to access and operate. 

 

Performance:

 

Too soon to tell. I drilled a few 3/16" holes in a 2" patio paver and it went through great. Drilled a few with the DeWalt and honestly didn't notice any difference. Perhaps the difference (assuming there is one) becomes more noticeable when drilling larger holes.

 

When I get time, my plan is to put both tools head-to-head by drilling a couple dozen 3/16" holes, then a couple dozen 1/4" holes, then a couple dozen 1/2" holes. First, I need to locate a suitable object or material to perform the test in. I don't really want to make Swiss cheese out of my driveway or garage floor.

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Once you do your test on your drills I would like to also do a test with my Bosch to see how they compare with these two drills.  They just look some much bigger then my drill!  I think these drills just eat through cinder block so I think poured concrete would be the best test.

 

I'm uploading a video s we speak.

 

Which Bosch model do you have again...?

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So here's a more telling video. Both rotary hammers drilling with the same 3/16" bits into concrete. 

 

 
I come up with times as follows, using the timer on the video:
 
Hilti: 
 
Drilled from: 2:04-4:19
Total drilling time: 2 minutes 15 seconds
Average time per hole: 11.25 seconds
 
DeWalt: 
 
Drilled from: 4:44-7:36
Total drilling time: 2 minutes, 52 seconds
Average time per hole: 14.33 seconds

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19iF_4vDV38

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Part 3....drilling into concrete with 1/2" bit.

 

DeWalt: 

 

Drilled from: 0:40-2:12

Total drilling time: 1 minutes, 32 seconds

Average time per hole: 30.66 seconds

 

Hilti: 

 

Drilled from: 2:36-3:55

Total drilling time: 1 minutes 19 seconds

Average time per hole: 26.33 seconds

 


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Good research damnyankee, clearly the hilti is slightly better. Not worth switching brands with those numbers. The drilling speed will only matter when having to drill tons of holes at a time. For a few holes here and there you can't go wrong with either one.

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