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Rohm vs Jacobson Chuck


Guest RIDGIDFAN

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Guest RIDGIDFAN

Hello FNG here.  I found this site while looking for info about Rohm.  Seems like a very informative site.  Anyways to my question my drill currently has the Jacobson 700 chuck and while it is nice I saw a Rohm chuck at the store the other day and thought wow thats pretty cool.

Can somebody tell me about Rohm?

Is it worth switching?

Will it be compatiable with my (hate to say this) ridgid drill?

Thanks

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Well Rohm has been around for almost a century. They make all types of specialty products from drills to specialty machining tools.

Dewalt chose Rohm because Jacob's chucks did not perform as well while in hammerdrill mode. Hence the reason you only find them on Dewalt's hammerdrill models. Jacobs grip is only as tight as you can ratchet it. While Rohm chucks put driving force on the jaws throughout your drilling/driving applications.

Unfortunately Rohm chucks are not compatible with the current shaft on Ridgid drills. Below is a link to all brands and models compatible with Rohm chucks.

ROHM CHART.

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Hello,

New member and first time poster here.

I just recently purchased a DeWalt combo kit that included a DC988 hammerdrill, impact driver, as well as 2 18V XRP batteries and charger. Just out of curiosity, I went and looked at the chuck and it's a Jacobs 700.

I happened to look at the chuck on my DeWalt drill at work, and it's a Rohm.

I have had my personal drill for maybe a couple weeks at the most, so I'm curious as to how I ended up with the Jacobs chuck if DeWalt went to using Rohm in their new hammerdrills?

Last weekend, I was working on a project at home and needed to drill a few 1/4" holes. So naturally, I whipped out my trusty DeWalt drill, and on the first hole... the drill bit slipped out of the chuck. Needless to say, I was a bit perplexed.

My company supplied drill on the job has never done this. Then again, it has the Rohm chuck.

How would I go about getting a Rohm chuck for my drill?

Thanks in advance.

   

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The Dewalt DC988 is a 3rd generation XRP drill. That drill get's bundled with other tools to create a hot buy. The DC988 was never equipped with a Rohm chuck. Or the 4th generation and beyond. The DC925, DC927, DCD950, DCD970, and a few other models are the only 18v models that included the Rohm.

If your using a Rohm, and then go to a ratchet jacobs. You may not be used to ratcheting the chuck tight? The Jacobs 700 series has been around for awhile and for the most part pretty reliable.

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  • 1 month later...

I still don't understand the difference between a ratcheting chuck vs. a self-tightening chuck...tried googling for answers, but couldn't find a good explanation.

My Dad's old drill is a DW959 and I would just spin it to lock/release the bit.  I know the DC720 has a ratcheting chuck, but when at HD or Lowes, the display model appeared to tighten the same way by just spinning the chuck/collar.  Where am I misunderstanding things?  "Ratcheting" makes me think of how a ratchet wrench works, but both drills seem to tighten in the same manner.  Thank you for your explanation!

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A ratchet style chuck you have to manually twist the chuck. The teeth only lock down as tight as you can ratchet it. The self tightening chuck does not require you to wrench down on it. You simply click the chuck to lock it. As you drill, the teeth self tighten as the chuck spins, constantly putting pressure on the teeth.

Hope that helps.

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  • 10 months later...

Just thought I'd chime in here with some info. I have owned the commercial model 18 volt DW988 XRP hammer drill for almost ten years now, and it came with the best chuck I've ever seen on it. It's a Rohm, but I can find no part number on it. The entire shell of the chuck is one piece and knurled, so tightening and loosening a bit is very easy, since the drill shaft is locked down when off. It has inserts in the jaws (carbide?) and has never allowed a bit to spin. It has a 'hex' cut into the ring surrounding the jaws so you can use a wrench to free up a bit that jams into whatever you're working on. Behind the hex is a 'freewheeling' tapered section that the instructions described as helpful in guiding the nose of the drill into 'fine', or tricky work. It ratchets somehow when tightening, but then goes into some kind of quarter-turn lockdown mode and stops. I'm convinced that the chuck cost more than the drill. If and when the drill fails, I will be making sure that whatever replacement I purchase can use this chuck. It's that good.

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  • 1 year later...
  • 1 month later...

I've been told that another term for ratcheting chuck is keyed chuck.  Typically it's faster to use a chuck key (such as a Jacob's type), but keyed chucks have more or less became a item of the past as keyless is much easier to work with and are much cheaper, but that my no longer be the case.

At this time, I don't know that much about hammer drills or Rohm chucks.  Jacobs Chucks and brand name chucks are what I am somewhat familiar with.  From what I gathered from all my research, Jacobs seemed to be the best types of chucks around, but that has since changed as Jacobs Chucks (or rather the company itself) seems to have been bought out by Apex Tools.   

You can find the original very high quality (the one's with handles are made in USA, the ones with keys on both sides are made in Japan.) at Sears it seems, but chucks themselves look rather questionable.  Stronger than the Craftsman chucks, but not as great as the Chuck's used in the late 90's early 00's.

This is coming from personal experience but good luck contacting Apex Tools (in this case, the Jacobs division) multiple times I have tried contacting them and I ended up just contacting a distributor they listed and they helped me.  My DW990 has a keyless chuck, but its one of the original Jacobs chuck that came with the drill, yet works perfectly without any issues. 

Mazdaman,  according to this link  http://www.ereplacementparts.com/dewalt-dcd930-type-144v-hammer-drill-parts-c-1009_9661_16251.html  the chuck is keyless or "twist" as it's sometimes called.

Your in luck though with this drill, none of the parts have been discontinued as of 2011.    However,  the current chuck that is offered replaces obsolete part #: 330075-72, 899515, 330075-72, 330075-63, 905261 and 330075-66. 

Keyless ChuckPart Number: 330075-91 is the current chuck offered for this chuck the cost on Ereplacement parts is $42.95 as of 2011.  If you ever have to replace the chuck though,  this distributor offers a better price it seems.  http://www.mcmaster.com

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I've been told that another term for ratcheting chuck is keyed chuck.  http://www.mcmaster.com

A keyed chuck is a chuck that uses a separate "key" to tighten up the chuck.  A ratcheting chuck is a type of KEYLESS chuck, where there is a ratcheting tensioner in it.  I do not know the technical portion, so forgive this explanation if it is overly "dumbed down".

As far as the comparison between Rohm and Jacobs, they are two of the best chuck producers in the world.  Jacobs is the most common, but Rohm builds the stronger/heavier duty chuck, which is why DeWALT uses them in the hammer drills.  Jacobs makes a quality chuck, and is used in most of the DeWALT non-hammer models, while the Rohm is used in all of the newer hammer drills.  Rohm chucks are typically slightly heavier, and more importantly, more expensive than Jacobs chucks, which is why many other tool manufacturers do not use them (it eats into the profit margin).

All that to say that the Rohm ratcheting and pusher (self tightening) chucks are the best in their class, however, Jacobs chucks are good as well.

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I've been told that another term for ratcheting chuck is keyed chuck.  http://www.mcmaster.com

A keyed chuck is a chuck that uses a separate "key" to tighten up the chuck.  A ratcheting chuck is a type of KEYLESS chuck, where there is a ratcheting tensioner in it.  I do not know the technical portion, so forgive this explanation if it is overly "dumbed down".

As far as the comparison between Rohm and Jacobs, they are two of the best chuck producers in the world.  Jacobs is the most common, but Rohm builds the stronger/heavier duty chuck, which is why DeWALT uses them in the hammer drills.  Jacobs makes a quality chuck, and is used in most of the DeWALT non-hammer models, while the Rohm is used in all of the newer hammer drills.  Rohm chucks are typically slightly heavier, and more importantly, more expensive than Jacobs chucks, which is why many other tool manufacturers do not use them (it eats into the profit margin).

All that to say that the Rohm ratcheting and pusher (self tightening) chucks are the best in their class, however, Jacobs chucks are good as well.

I see,  since I am still new to chucks in general, I figured when I asked the mcmaster employee that he had more accurate information than what I could find right off the bat.  So there are three types, keyed, keyless, and ratcheting.

I've learned that Jacob's makes great chucks, but as you know, I have limited knowledge of Rohm chucks.    I had a feeling Rohm chucks were more expensive based on the fact they are used in Dewalt hammer drills, but it's interesting to learn more about them.

So once (and hopefully for all) let me get this straight.  Rohm chucks are top of the line, Jacob's chucks are medium ground (some being better than others) and the last type is just name brand type (Makita, Milwaukee, Craftsman brand). 

Thanks for the help Kjones. 

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I don't want to make it sounds like Jacobs are lower quality, because they are one of the best.  Rohm just has something special with the couple of models that DeWALt chose to use in the DCD970/950 18v models, as well as all of the new 20v MAX models.  You will find though that most major drill brands use Jacobs chucks, and a lot of Jacobs models are really great products, but they have sum sub-par models as well.  I'm sorry that this probably made it even more confusing than before, but it is what it is!

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I thought all of the 3-speeds were using Rohm chucks, with the compacts using a Jacobs. My DCD785 is a Jacobs and the DCD985 is Rohm.

I much preferred the self tighting Rohm (XRP) over the rachiting Rohm (20V Max). I've not had a bad experience with either, but most of my tools with Jacobs chucks use a key.

I don't want to make it sounds like Jacobs are lower quality, because they are one of the best.  Rohm just has something special with the couple of models that DeWALt chose to use in the DCD970/950 18v models, as well as all of the new 20v MAX models.  You will find though that most major drill brands use Jacobs chucks, and a lot of Jacobs models are really great products, but they have sum sub-par models as well.  I'm sorry that this probably made it even more confusing than before, but it is what it is!

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Only Dewalt's Hammerdrill's use the ROHM chuck. Not sure what they use across the pond, probably ROHM on all the XR/XRP drills.

I've really enjoyed my ROHM pusher on my DC925, 927. DCD950 and 970, but during heavy use it has always self-tighten's to the point where it is extremely difficult to unlock and remove the bit.

I've logged some hours on the 20v Max DCD985 with ROHM's Ratcheting version, and so far so good. I do prefer the ratcheting feel, over the simple "clip" feel on the ROHM Pusher.

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Hi, my DCD785 (compact hammer drill - 20V Max) is using a Jacobs chuck. I did not realize there was a different chuck being used between the hammer vrs non-hammer.

Only Dewalt's Hammerdrill's use the ROHM chuck. Not sure what they use across the pond, probably ROHM on all the XR/XRP drills.

I've really enjoyed my ROHM pusher on my DC925, 927. DCD950 and 970, but during heavy use it has always self-tighten's to the point where it is extremely difficult to unlock and remove the bit.

I've logged some hours on the 20v Max DCD985 with ROHM's Ratcheting version, and so far so good. I do prefer the ratcheting feel, over the simple "clip" feel on the ROHM Pusher.

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I don't want to make it sounds like Jacobs are lower quality, because they are one of the best.  Rohm just has something special with the couple of models that DeWALt chose to use in the DCD970/950 18v models, as well as all of the new 20v MAX models.  You will find though that most major drill brands use Jacobs chucks, and a lot of Jacobs models are really great products, but they have sum sub-par models as well.  I'm sorry that this probably made it even more confusing than before, but it is what it is!

Oh I knew Jacob's made great chucks, but I just figured why not make diagram to maybe help others in case they were still unsure.  As everyone here is well aware, my Dewalt Cordless Drill DW990K Type 4 uses a 1/2" (13 mm) so I do have some "field" experience.  I like the keyless feature as well.

Dewaltdude:  Hope you don't have a Type 1, as most of those components have been discontinued.  Here is a link.  http://www.ereplacementparts.com/dewalt-dcd780c2-type-18v-drilldriver-parts-c-1009_1162_157663.html

This link to this model also has a host of discontinued parts as well.  http://www.ereplacementparts.com/dewalt-dcd780c2b2-type-20v-compact-drilldriver-parts-c-1009_1162_157712.html

However I am not sure what state your in Dewalt Dude, but  I recommend Banner Tool Service and even talking to ereplacementparts for help on finding out what type of chuck you might have.  I'd advise asking for a part number though for your chuck. 

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When parts get discontinued like that, it just means that there has been some small tweak to a component, which will roll into all tools that come in for repair as well as all of the new ones.  So if there is a component that is weak, or if a distributor changes, or any number of other reasons for a change, the part changes on the diagram.  So if you had an issue with a drill for example, and you take it to the service center, it will get replaced with the new variations of the components.  Not a big deal, just little rolling changes.

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