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How to remove electric brake in cordless drill?


Flexon

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Hello, does anybody know if there’s a way of disabling the electric brake from a cordless drill?

I have a DeWalt 14,4v cordless hammerdrill - DC984 – and it would be really helpful for me if I could just remove the electric brake function. I’m a biologist and have to use it to do some mixtures and the electric brake makes the rotation flow unevenly.

I know I could just buy a cheaper drill that doesn’t have that function, but the overall performance on the DeWalt makes a lot of difference, and buying the specialized equipment for that would be too expensive.

Can anybody help?

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I am not sure how you would, remove that.  It functions through the motor having a reverse current sent to the motor when you let off the trigger. I think it would be pretty complicated to reprogram that, but that is just my assumption.

You could always just go with a corded drill, as they typically do not have brakes.

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Yes, your right Kjones, and thanks for the reply.

I could use a corded one, unfortunately they generally run at higher speeds. I am actually using a corded DW245 (low speed 0-600rpm triple reduction drill) but the DC984 (14,4v cordless hammerdrill) would be better because of the relation between speed/torque and the actual “type†of movement. The movement is something very subtle in practice, and I don’t know if I can precisely explain that.

About the modification I would like to do… there is a mechanical “recess†that is, the mandrill have a small free movement without traction. You can see that when it is off power. The mandrill rotates a little back and forward (don’t know how to explain either). It seams to me that, if I could fix it to the traction, giving it no “recessâ€, the mandrill always tied to the gears, my problem would be solved.

The recess is what, as seems to me, gives the necessary rotational impact to mechanically activate the electric brake in the trigger, when the drill suddenly stops.

I believe I don’t have to actually disable the feature, but just make it less efficient.

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the movement of the chuck is due to 3 or 4 metal pins located somewhere inside the gears where the chuck shaft connects to the transmission. if you want to get rid of that movement, the only thing i can think of is by removing the pins and replacing them with metal that can fill the gaps. i don't know how will you go about doing that...though.

my two cents.

edit: part of the shaft is cut out like a dove tail and gives free movement too like this picture shows of a drill i have apart...

right click on picture select view then zoom in to view whole resolution...

DLgVU4g.jpg

conclusion, too complicated to g et rid of that movement, impossible, nope...but then who knows what will affect doing that.

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Golden Valley Const, thanks also for the reply. Although the way I use it, its not a matter of practice, since I?m not holding the tool. It is fixed in a somewhat table, and the trigger is pressed still by an arrangement of fasteners. The problem with the movement of the chuck is that it is not as stable as I need it to be when mixing materials of too different densities.

And very, very good information ToolJoe, i?m thinking about trying that. I guess those metal pins would be the very first connection between the chuck and the gears, because the movement is the same in any of the three speeds.  If the movement were different depending on the speed, it would meant that it came after one of the gears reductions, which it would make it a lot more complicated to understand, and that also means I would have to dismantle more of the tool.

And I guess if I can understand that piece, I could make the metal to fit it. Or at least draw and ask a technician to do that.

Before I start, can you tell me if they are movable or fixed pins? Or give me a little more tips on dismantling the drill? Maybe I would have to make the whole new axe for the chuck just to increase the base. In this case, I wouldn’t have the tools or the technical help I needed.

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if you are committed to doing this...the easiest way to go about this is to remove the pins and tack weld at the location where the arrow point too.

note: this drill is not the same model you have...this is a 20v max although they may have similar innards.

the way i take apart this is very very slowly and lay out the parts on the table in order so i juts put everything back in reverse.

in this picture is shows where there is play between the collar and the chuck shaft so you need to tack weld and done...

mm2gvQ4.jpg

to recap, removing the pins no longer locks the chuck to the transmission..iow, it will turn the gears and the motor if you turn the chuck by hand (will function like a corded drill, if i can explain myself right)... the tack weld will remove the chuck freeplay...but remember, after all is done..you will be able to turn the chuck by hand because the pins act as a clutch to the chuck. hope i explain myself right..

good luck.

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Hello ToolJoe, believe it or not I just did what you told. There where 5 pins in my drill. The hardest part was actually removing the chuck.

I’ve removed the pins and put in metal. (I took some pictures, don?t know how to put here yet). The brake is not working anymore, it rotates when I force it, just as you said, and it is much, much better for mixing. Impressive, you know I even went to the authorize technicians in here, and they (two of them) told me the brakes were simply because it had too many gears so it would make it hard to pull when off power, consequentially it would all be a matter trigger’s program.

But there is still that little “recessâ€, the mandrill rotating a little, back and forth when it is off power.

I don?t wanna sound ungrateful since it is many times better than before, but, can I tighten that movement to the gears also? 

And thanks a lot ToolJoe, you already helped me so much.

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by looking at this video here...

looks similar to your model i believe...at 2:01 i see the shaft has a potion being shaven flat on both sides...my guess is that it has a collar similar to my drill...that is what needs to be welded...

here is a closer look to what i am talking about....

skdqzny.jpg

that gap is what is causing the freeplay of the chuck...the prefer way to  get rid of that is to tack weld it...a dirty way would be to stick a small nail in there...making sure is not loose that it can come out..what i would do is find a good size wood nail, cut off the size that can fit there and jam it carefully with a chisel and hammer...your call.

good luck.

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Very interesting video, that drill looks like mine.

Oh, I saw the gap in the picture ToolJoe, but seams that your model is quite different from mine in there. And, after I put the metal piece, there is no movement between the two pieces, no gap. I did some playing with the gears and seams to me that, what is causing the freeplay is the space between the teeth in the gears and that is amplified by the arrangement of the planetary gears. I’ll try to put the pictures. You will see, there is no gap between them. Unfortunately, if I am right, that would mean the freeplay cannot be fixed.

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In the first picture, is the piece that I remove from the drill, in witch I left one pin, just to show (there were 5 pins).

In the second picture is the piece attached with a metal, I used the sheath from a tuna fish can! Believe me, there is no play in that place.

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you can post pictures through an online host...i use this site since it is no hassle....http://imgur.com/ click on the button computer, select the picture you want to upload, and then copy the BBCode (message boards & forums) here...

regarding the chuck freeplay movement, after further researching, i believe that the "gap" in the collar is a key feature to engage the pins...the gears spacing in between the teeth should not give you that much freeplay... for sure less than 1/16th of an inch...if you get more than that, there is a "gap" somewhere in there...the "gap" in three of my drills gives me 1/2 inch chuck play.

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