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here is an example of assembly line mistake...


tooljoe

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so i bought me an open item 12v tool kit from amazon and discovered why the open item may have been returned to amazon. the 12v charger was not working...me being me, i decided to take a peek and discovered that a resistor was soldered on backwards....in the picture, the charger on the right is the good charger...just sharing to show that a percentage of bad assembly goes out the door sometimes.

to view full size picture, on firefox, right click select "view image"...then click on picture.

EZUw7E8.jpg

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thanks for the info, you learn something every day :)...never knew they could be installed either way. how about that POT (on top it says phihong) next to the big capacitor...that one is also backwards compared to the charger that works...if you know anyways....if not is kool.

it is not really important to fix it since i already own a few 20v/12v max chargers...i am just curious as to what is causing the problem.

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The "phihong" part that's above the power input and capacitor and to the left of the big electrolytic cap looks to be a common mode choke (inductor), it shouldnt matter which way its assembled.

HI-POT is an electrical insulation rating/test.

If you post high-res pictures of the faulty one (or both) we might be able to see (IF its a fault that is visible) any faulty parts.  May well be something that is not visible though.

Easiest thing to look for would be electrolytic capacitors that are bulging (top and/or sides), leaking, or split.  Or anything that looks burned/scorched/cracked. 

IF it doesnt even power on, no lights/sounds/etc...  AND your handy with a soldering iron you could de-solder the fuse (reddish colored component marked "F1") and then check it with a ohm-meter, should be very low resistance.  Only really need to de-solder 1 leg of it to test it, but may be easier to just remove it for testing.  (the fuse is not polarity sensitive either.)  IF you have any warranty on it though this WILL void it.

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you could de-solder the fuse (reddish colored component marked "F1") and then check it with a ohm-meter, should be very low resistance.  Only really need to de-solder 1 leg of it to test it, but may be easier to just remove it for testing.  (the fuse is not polarity sensitive either.)  IF you have any warranty on it though this WILL void it.

i'll desolder the fuse tomorrow and measure the ohms.

as for the warranty, don't really care about it.

thanks for the info.

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