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Tool - Newbie - Corded Drill


Amitabh

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Hello

I am new home owner and looking to buy some tools to have handy around the house. I have been doing some research and have come to my own conclusion that I want a corded drill. I dont believe i would be using the li-ion drill often enough to warrant spending the $$$ and not having the power when needed. So a corded drill fits those two clauses better: inexpensive and power ready.

Ii have come down to two options - there may be more out there, but am not aware...

Dewalt 115 - 3/8 chuck, 1200 rpms $79.99

comes with hard case

or

Dewalt 235 - 1/2 chuck, 850 rpms $99.99

no case or bag

My question is, what is the better buy for a DIY home user. I am handy around the house and do see myself building/fixing things.

Amitabh

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Not for what you are doing. The bigger chuck has a slower RPM, but more torque to get through tougher work. If you are just drilling holes or using fasteners, either will work. My guess is the 1/2" will be a bit heavier if that is OK. Its nice to have the 1/2" if you need it, but if you think that will never be needed, go with the 3/8" as it is lighter, you have a case. I have a 1/2" milwaukee corded drill and no case. I used the 1/2" chuck about three times in 5 years. Nice to have, but I could have figured something else out if I only had a 3/8" chuck.

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Well, where would having a 1/2 chuck be useful?

weight wise, they are about the same, but with the 3/8 chuck model the handle is in the middle, therefore spreading the weight evenly. I dont want to own many drills, prefer to have one that does 80% of the jobs and either borrow/rent if needed.

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The 1/2" will allow you to use more bits. Both guns have the same the amps and the weights are about the same. The 1/2" gives you more capacity and more option for different bits. A mjority of home owners only really need a 3/8" bit. Some examples where a 1/2" has worked for me, I ran a line from my RO system in the basement to my freezer upstairs and the hole was 1", so I did need a 1/2" chuck for that bit. Again there are only a few times you really need the 1/2". Balance is huge when using a drill and the 115 model will allow you more control.

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