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6ah and 9ah battery coming!!!


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still not brushless...hmmmm

Found a "heavy duty news" PDF on the uk site that showed an interesting page on the 9ah battery. It showed what tools they are considering it for and it shows a miter saw!!

Really?  Because ego makes 56V x 2.0AH batteries (well technically 50.4V)   The thing is to get the most efficiency, power output, voltage input, and motor size should all scale together, so

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The 9ah is a good idea. Wish more companies would come out with a XL battery

I don't see much point in lugging around super sized batteries.  Even for tools that need a higher current draw I'd rather stick two regular packs on than have a 9.0 sitting around just for that tool.

 

It's like Milwaukee is trying to work up to a 36V line that's still labeled under M18.

 

Edit: I guess I can understand it in cases where you have enough batteries to have some dedicated for high power tools, but in my situation it's not a good solution.  Actually one of my favorites things about Makita is the 18x2 platform so I can really run everything on one battery platform.

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I would rather have 2 4.0 or 5.0 batteries over a 9.0 besides how far away from power would you have to be to have 9.0 versus 4.0 and how much will that actually be gained cost wise?

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I don't see much point in lugging around super sized batteries.  Even for tools that need a higher current draw I'd rather stick two regular packs on than have a 9.0 sitting around just for that tool.

 

It's like Milwaukee is trying to work up to a 36V line that's still labeled under M18.

 

Edit: I guess I can understand it in cases where you have enough batteries to have some dedicated for high power tools, but in my situation it's not a good solution.  Actually one of my favorites things about Makita is the 18x2 platform so I can really run everything on one battery platform.

 

Agreed, it's a very good solution and I can't think of a good reason why others haven't copied this idea.

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Personally im hoping Makita will combine the 18x2 platform with 9amp batteries for new cordless tools like: 10/12 inch miters. 9" grinders, sds max hammers, table saws, chainsaws.

36v brushless motors will give the power. 2x 9.0 amps will give a long runtime that is needed in my opinion for these tools to functions as replacements of corded tools ( in most cases )

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Other than mostly stationary tools like a cordless miter saw, I'd rather have one 9ah than two 5ah. It would have you a lot on weight. Yes the 9ah are heavier but not a heady as two 5ah. I'd use a 9ah in my fuel 7 1/4 or fuel sawzall on demo day.

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i would put a 9.0 in a fuel skilsaw, or the sawzall, I don't have either tool yet but if I was going to get them I would buy a 9.0 for them. I have 2 2.0 and 1 5.0 for my fuel impact and drill I use the 5.0 in my drill for when I need a bucket of 20 minute drywall mud or a bucket of tile glue... I can mix about 5 buckets worth on a full charge which is a lot better than the 2 I get with the 2.0 ones. the 9.0 would mix any bucket I needed in a day but if I mix more than 5 buckets I would pull out the cord and a mixer drill. I like the cordless for quick use, where I need to go from mixing a bucket to drilling holes for drains or vents. and even plumbing. the 5.0 lasts me a week with a full charge most cases. so going to the 9.0 for me right now would be pointless. however, the circ saw or recip saw would be able to make the choice easier on the 9.0

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i would put a 9.0 in a fuel skilsaw, or the sawzall, I don't have either tool yet but if I was going to get them I would buy a 9.0 for them. I have 2 2.0 and 1 5.0 for my fuel impact and drill I use the 5.0 in my drill for when I need a bucket of 20 minute drywall mud or a bucket of tile glue... I can mix about 5 buckets worth on a full charge which is a lot better than the 2 I get with the 2.0 ones. the 9.0 would mix any bucket I needed in a day but if I mix more than 5 buckets I would pull out the cord and a mixer drill. I like the cordless for quick use, where I need to go from mixing a bucket to drilling holes for drains or vents. and even plumbing. the 5.0 lasts me a week with a full charge most cases. so going to the 9.0 for me right now would be pointless. however, the circ saw or recip saw would be able to make the choice easier on the 9.0

Unless I'm doing some heavy drilling I'd probably stick with the 5.0, but for the saws, even the band saw, new lights, sds drills, the higher cal batteries would be good. As long as the price isn't redo cultus I'll probably pick up a 6.0 and maybe a 9.0.

Jimbo

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Unless I'm doing some heavy drilling I'd probably stick with the 5.0, but for the saws, even the band saw, new lights, sds drills, the higher cal batteries would be good. As long as the price isn't redo cultus I'll probably pick up a 6.0 and maybe a 9.0.

Jimbo

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I forgot about the lights! But again price could be an issue... If they have a price point of anywhere near $180 I'd be okay with it. Considering the 5.0 are at $150 here at the local HD.

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I forgot about the lights! But again price could be an issue... If they have a price point of anywhere near $180 I'd be okay with it. Considering the 5.0 are at $150 here at the local HD.

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At Hd for 99 you can get a 5.0 with a charger, it's not the rapid charge but you could probably sell it for 30 bucks on eBay.

Jimbo

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I think a larger cordless tool like a miter would be ideal for a 9Ah pack like this. Also Milwaukee showed the 9Ah is superior to 2x5Ah packs. More cells internally means a drop in overall internal resistance in the pack so it gives better runtime, less heat and a other advantages like ability to do heavy work over extended periods of time without overheating the pack. Size and weight are the downsides for the 9Ah pack but for a miter saw or larger hand tools like an SDS, or their LED work lights or other two handed type tools the size and weight increase are a worthwhile trade off imho.

Makitas 36v dual battery tools are nice and two 18v packs are nice but they add considerable bulk to all but the largest tools and you have to make sure you always have a pair of equally charged batteries available otherwise you're going to limited to the weaker pack. Also the tool has to be 36v to use two packs. Milwaukee's 9Ah pack should supercharge any m18 tool or light or vacuum...

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I think a larger cordless tool like a miter would be ideal for a 9Ah pack like this. Also Milwaukee showed the 9Ah is superior to 2x5Ah packs. More cells internally means a drop in overall internal resistance in the pack so it gives better runtime, less heat and a other advantages like ability to do heavy work over extended periods of time without overheating the pack. Size and weight are the downsides for the 9Ah pack but for a miter saw or larger hand tools like an SDS, or their LED work lights or other two handed type tools the size and weight increase are a worthwhile trade off imho.

Makitas 36v dual battery tools are nice and two 18v packs are nice but they add considerable bulk to all but the largest tools and you have to make sure you always have a pair of equally charged batteries available otherwise you're going to limited to the weaker pack. Also the tool has to be 36v to use two packs. Milwaukee's 9Ah pack should supercharge any m18 tool or light or vacuum...

And where had Milwaukee 'proven' that a 9 amp is better then 2x5 amp batteries ?

I would like to see that.

A Milwaukee 9 amp divides the needed amperage between 3 rows of cells.

A Makita 18x2 tool divides the needed amperage between 4 rows of cells. Your story about less heat. Less eternal resistance. Less strain on the batteries, etc..... Thats true for the dual 18v setup more then it is for a single 9 amp pack.

Thats suite logical ? :)

60 amp draw on a 9 amp Milwaukee battery means 20 amp draw from each row of cells.

60 amp draw on a Makita dual 18v setup means 15 amp draw from each row of cells... Thus.. Less heat. Resistance and strain on the Makita batteries.

The added bulk is a negatieve tho !

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Milwaukee did have a demonstration where they were comparing amperage draw on their new 9amp compared to the older 5 amp battery. The test showed that the 9 amp had alot longer runtime compared to the 5 amp then you would suspect from having 4 amps more.

This is also quite logical. The current draw is split between 3 rows of cells in the 9 amp.

And on the 5 amp that current is split between 2 rows this increaing heat and internal resistance leading to less runtime on the 5 amp.

That idea is 'double' true for the Makita 18x2 system. It has 4 rows of cells to split current draw too.

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The angle grinder would just love a 9ah battery. They drain the 5ah battery so quickly, the other battery you just drained, doesn't even have time to start charging (cooldown mode) before you have drained yet another one.

hmm odd, I run my fuel grinder with 4.0 batteries and don't seem to have that problem sure the 9.0 would give it longer run time but the 4.0 does just fine 

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Milwaukee did have a demonstration where they were comparing amperage draw on their new 9amp compared to the older 5 amp battery. The test showed that the 9 amp had alot longer runtime compared to the 5 amp then you would suspect from having 4 amps more.

This is also quite logical. The current draw is split between 3 rows of cells in the 9 amp.

And on the 5 amp that current is split between 2 rows this increaing heat and internal resistance leading to less runtime on the 5 amp.

That idea is 'double' true for the Makita 18x2 system. It has 4 rows of cells to split current draw too.

It's an interesting discussion to be sure but I don't really know how it's all handled internally by the tool though. My thought would be going to 36v cancels out any advantage on internal resistance because each battery is still the same pack with same internal resistance which can't change. 36v means the battery is being used the same as if the other battery wasn't even there because it is an independent unit still being used at 18v internally. If the battery has some kind of circuitry where it detected being used paired up with another I guess it would be possible to change things but that would be awfully complicated and the benefits of such a system wouldn't be outweighed by the complexity and cost when most times a battery pack is going to be used by itself.
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