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History of melted wax on saw blades


jon burgess

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mainly used for lubricant, melts as wood heats up the blade as it cuts and keeps resins from wood building on cutting edge....

here is a newer version of the same stuff...

http://www.amazon.com/Olson-AC70010-Blade-Lubricant-Blades/dp/B000P4SK9E

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Are you sure that's for lubricant and not storage comp?  I've seen all sorts of stuff applied to blades like that to prevent rust, but for lubrication it's always just a stick rubbed on the blade between cuts.

 

as an aside, Dewalt actually puts resin in the vibration dampening slots of some of their newer blades for lubrication.

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I agree, and with a closer look at the pic posted I see the blade is not carbide tipped, about protection and rust however that is mainly for complete iron blades as carbide tips of a carbide toothed blade will not rust. I seen them being coated in wax for lubrication long ago...

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Yea wax was used and is used on saw blades to aid in cutting, but the type you see on that blade as well as other steel blades is to preserve and on carbide blades and router bits is for safety and transportation. Carbide is very sharp and ver fragile to shock. So I have not seen a bad answer here you guys are very knowledgable.

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I have a beeswax log that I have had for years that I have hardly used, maybe I'll try rubbing it on my tablesaw blade next time I cut some hardwood and see if it helps with the cut.

Beeswax is VERY sticky since it never totally hardens. I'm not sure it would be a good choice as a blade lubricant. Regular candle wax (paraffin) or even car wax might be better choices.

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Beeswax is VERY sticky since it never totally hardens. I'm not sure it would be a good choice as a blade lubricant. Regular candle wax (paraffin) or even car wax might be better choices.

It gets slick from the heat of friction. I always use bee's wax when I'm running Finnish sscrews into a hard wood like oak. In cabinets and skirt boards risers and treads. Bars of soap is another good option. I like dove or Irish spring. Lol. And they make a huge difference. From breaking screws to not braking any. With predrilling.

Sent from my LGAS995 using Tapatalk

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Not much of a secret.  I learned to use irish spring on screws from my father.  Of course that's mostly obsolete now.  I haven't used that trick in a decade or so with cordless drills and now impact drivers.

Believe it or not Jeff, I still use the soap on very rare occasion with hardwoods but since getting a set of real nice drill bits with a counterbore I find I use it less and less. I got that trick from Dad too.

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We use that stuff (wax) in our shop,we have big heated bins you just dip the cutting edges in and it hardens fairly quick,keeps cutting tools sharp while in storage. Saw blades,endmills all sorts of stuff. It works great. 

 

Beeswax is great stuff,we used it in the air force as lube for drill bits and such wasnt super messy and it just works.  My old man still uses the soap on a screw trick,he showed me that long ago

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