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Projects going on?


Conductor562

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Oh man, I better not let my wife see this. She is going to want me to start something around the house. Right now I am doing a house remodeling. We gutted a house from the 60's and redoing the whole house. I just got done framing up the basement.

I have too much stuff to do to my house. It was built in the 20;s and needs so much work. The first thing I want to tackle is the garage. It use to be my work shop, but my kids moved in and their toys are everywhere. Then off to redo the fence that is falling down. How about you.

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I am very interested in how projects differ in the U.S and the rest of the world from how we tackle things in the U.K.

Being a perfectionist with my own trade I am addicted to learning lol. :)

We seem to use brick where you guys use timber much more, and we have heavy tiles or slates on our roof rather than felt or timber shingles.

But I would love to know how other things are different. :)

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Here in Florida, tin is one of the most common roofing materials, followed by asphalt or fiberglass shingles, we use felt only on a low angle roofs, like 5 degrees or less. Slate is wickedly expensive here, tile only slightly less so. We do on occasion also run into copper roofing but this is becoming even rarer as the price of copper rises. Ceder shingle are pretty rare, used mainly for historic restoration.

I do try and stay away from masonry as much as I can. I prefer to work with "big dumb" wood. We have a mix of construction here in FL, the two most common forms of houses are cement block and stick built, followed by prefab, then mobile homes. Most of the brick construction here is historic. Timber frame is really rare. Please note, the US is a large country and things are different in other regions. Nationwide, I would say that stick built house are the most common. It is only in the Southeast that cement block houses are really common. Brick buildings are a lot more common in the Northeast.

I am assuming that you know that stick built is built predominately with 2" x 4" lumber, timber frame is done with 6" x 6" or greater wood. Most of our timberframe is done in the Northeast and Northwest, although a lot of faux timberframe is showing up as decorative elements.

One of the things that I had to adapt to since I moved here from the Northeast is hurricane standards. Here we have to build our houses to withstand prolonged wind loads. In some areas of the country, like California , they build with seismic loads in mind. We in Florida share a lot in common with how we accomplish these goals. Most of this involves really securing the structure to the foundation, and securing the roof from lifting forces. It seems really odd that we have more fasteners holding things down then keeping them up...

I volunteer a lot in my spare time. One of the more interesting projects I'm working on is bird feeder kits for Eco Adventure days at my local state park. I also volunteer at an old water works, that we are transforming into an environmental education center and community garden, and I help keep an abandoned cemetery maintained.

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So by stick built you mean built on site from timber rather than pre made in a factory and assembled on site?

Yes. Stick built are built on site. We call factory built houses Pre-Fabs and if they have wheels under them we call them mobile homes.

Here in the US we differentiate lumber and timber. Lumber is small dimensional wood like 2" x 4" through 2" x 12", Timber usually refers to wood that is larger than 6" x 6"

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Ah just language difference that's all pal.

Over here timber is any wood at all,we don't call any of it lumber.

We also have mobile homes so at least that is the same.hahaha

I am sure over time we will all get used to each others terminology lol. :)

Took me a while to figure it out, I can be a little thick sometimes. I guess that's what happens when we bastardize your language. :)

I have a couple of friends who build historic American Indian structures called a chickee, that do an interesting thatch styled roof made out of palmetto fronds.

Do you all every work with asphalt or fiberglass shingles for roofing? Have you ever had a chance to do thatched or a sod roofing?

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There are very few thatched roofs in this area.I have seen a couple nearer the Fylde coast, and there are a lot more down south.

We tend to use cold roofing felt on garden sheds, and hot bitumen pored as an adhesive for felt on what we call flat roofs (these have very little angle on them at all).

In the past I have done lead,copper, brass, tin and plastic coated tin/steel.

I like the very old style work and the very old style of doing the work, it may take time and a lot of hard work but the sense of satisfaction is fantastic when you walk by, look up and think to yourself yep I did that. :)

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I'm getting ready to start restoring a 1968 International Cub Cadet lawn tractor. 1961 was the first year for the Cub Cadets. It was still being used up until 2 years ago. I built primitive/rustic furniture and things pretty regularly.

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I've got an eighties era Wheel Horse from before Toro took them over. They don't build tractors like that any more. There is a pretty good community built around some old tractor brands, like the Wheel Horse Collectors Club. One of these days when I clear enough space in my shop I hope to restore a real tractor. I have always got my eyes out for an Allis Chalmers model G You may find a community for vintage Cub Cadets interesting. In a past life, I made my living restoring vintage Japanese motorcycles.

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Wow, even from Chicago to Florida, the building seems different. Guess with the different weather and our corrupt codes.

Corrupt codes??? Isn't you states code built on the ICC/IBC ? Most of our code down hear does make some kind of sense, maybe a little overkill in some instances, but still there is some logic behind it. Not mentioning the RRP, and really hoping they restore the opt out provision.

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Our code here is awful. Very safe like everyone else, but doesn't make sense from town to town or county to county. You can tell which towns or areas are huge in union and which ones are not. Certain areas, you can build base on payoffs. Guess that is Chicago for you.

I've got an eighties era Wheel Horse from before Toro took them over. They don't build tractors like that any more. There is a pretty good community built around some old tractor brands, like the Wheel Horse Collectors Club. One of these days when I clear enough space in my shop I hope to restore a real tractor. I have always got my eyes out for an Allis Chalmers model G You may find a community for vintage Cub Cadets interesting. In a past life, I made my living restoring vintage Japanese motorcycles.

Take some before and after pictures. Isn't that tractor worth a lot of money?

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Our code here is awful. Very safe like everyone else, but doesn't make sense from town to town or county to county. You can tell which towns or areas are huge in union and which ones are not. Certain areas, you can build base on payoffs. Guess that is Chicago for you.

Take some before and after pictures. Isn't that tractor worth a lot of money?

Garden tractors are not really that collectable unless they have some really distinctive features.

There are no before and after for my Wheel Horse, I bought it new around 1984 and is still in good shape. Way to remind me of how old I'm getting, that and the fact that most of my motorcycles are eligible for antique license plates. Conductor562 might have some interesting pictures from his restoration.

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Got started on the tear down today. Turns out it's a 1962 model. You know, the tires are shot and it looks like hell, but it's actually in pretty sound working condition. The motor's going to be a trick. It's pre alternator and is equipped with a generator. I've never done any work on anything quite this old, but I've got a buddy that dabbles in Gravley's who's agreed to help me out. Luckily the transmission and rear end seem to be in good shape.

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Best part so far: NO METRIC! Everything is 3/4, 1/2, or 7/16 all stainless SAE! Don't remember the last thing I worked on I could say that about. I removed bolts that had been in place for 50 years and never rounded off a single one. Used a little WD-40 and they twisted right out. It's nice to work on something that was built with pride.

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Yea, but you'd be surprised how much better it looks after taking off the fubar'd mower deck and hitting with 3 cans of degreaser. All the larger bolts have the International Harvester logo on them. I broke em down with a combo wrench and finished off with a 3/8 Proto ratchet, but to be honest, I think the Proto ratchet could've handled it alone. It amazing that a machine built so simply was still in use until last summer. I'm figuring on a project cost of around $1000 dollars and taking about 8 months to complete. It could be significantly less depending on how the motor looks when I open it up. I've got a machinist buddy that offered to repair the deck for whatever the material cost so that helps. I figure fair market value will be between $1500 and $1800 once completed. I'm not building it to sell though, just wanted something to tinker with and I enjoy preserving relics of days gone by. You buy something comparable now and it's junk in less than 10 years. Thought about putting a modern motor on it but that just isn't how I roll, lol.

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  • 9 months later...

I know old topic. BUT!!!! I am exited I am in the process of buying a 1912 Colonial on a corner lot. It's gonna need a lot of work. Roof, rotted porch, one car garage coming down to make room for a 2 1/2 car garage, plaster ceilings falling, new bathrooms and kitchen.  On the good side Original hardwood throughout, original oak base,casing and crown. Foier is all oak hardwood. Wish me luck!!!!

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