Jump to content

Any mechanics in here?


Stercorarius

Recommended Posts

So there may have been an incident in which a few pushrods may have fell on the floor. I've always been told this is a death sentence for these things and the way to check them is to roll them on glass. They weren't that expensive and the heads I bought had a sketchy valve job done anyway so I may have to buy adjustable pushrods anyways. For future reference though, how bad is it actually if a pushrod falls or gets dropped?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know push rods can be tested by sound if they look straight, if you drop them from a few inches from the ground onto something like steel or concrete if they ping ok if they thud replace......

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Bigmikez said:

Comp u Da Man bro!! Our mechanic said the same thing lol!

thanks not a mechanic per say but have built a few racing motors in my racing days.....here is a pic of a car running my last build, 396CID big block chev with aluminum rectangular port heads polished and ported with a 850 triple barrel......car runs mid 9's bracket 4 super......

1010691_10152366264884784_8851796028075364853_n.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks not a mechanic per say but have built a few racing motors in my racing days.....here is a pic of a car running my last build, 396CID big block chev with aluminum rectangular port heads polished and ported with a 850 triple barrel......car runs mid 9's bracket 4 super......

1010691_10152366264884784_8851796028075364853_n.jpg.f7f6c43278d8e82ebbdb37099c315bfb.jpg

Geez comp that's sweet. My motor is actually identical in displacement, but it's a Ford and has a thin (.070) cylinder wall that really should be sleeved, so it won't be seeing a raceway any time soon. You have any tips, tricks or common mistakes that you'd be willing to share with a wet-behind-the-ears ignorant kid that's getting into motors?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would imagine that tgey would be fine but you could roll them on something that is flat and see if they are still straight. Our engines teacher always told us to never soak the lifters in oil as well. How much longer before the engine is done? I can give you some tips on how to break it in. Also engine assembly lube is your friend.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love that '67!

 

Not a mechanic but did my share of pit crew on my buddy's drag truck. Comp hit the nail on the head. Be glad you didn't drop a cam shaft, that one you'd know is done because they'll break in half or worse instantly every time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

true story, back in our younger years of racing about 22 years old buddy and I were building a big block chevelle, we had just dropped $1200 on an iskenderian roller rocker set up with solid lift cam and titanium valves, we had brand new chrome deep dish valve covers that we didn't realize would no longer fit........got it all installed 7PM Saturday night and no valve covers?......out came the hammer and double gaskets with lots of silicone.....fun fun fun....that was just a street car, we later tubed it out rebuilt the frame and ended up with a 9" ford rear end with a four link set up...to this day the new owner runs the car low 10's about a year after he bought it we put a full cage in it for him....

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Stercorarius said:

That's awesome stuff comp. Hate Ford motors all you want (which I can understand), but you can't argue with those axles.

well truth be told we only used the ford housing, the rest of the rear end was Strange products......

http://www.strangeengineering.net/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would imagine that tgey would be fine but you could roll them on something that is flat and see if they are still straight. Our engines teacher always told us to never soak the lifters in oil as well. How much longer before the engine is done? I can give you some tips on how to break it in. Also engine assembly lube is your friend.

Wait, how does he propose you pime your hydraulic flat tappet lifters? Just use an oil pump primer? The motor is basically done. I just need to check the clearance on the rocker arms and break it in. I've had quite a bit of guys tell me how to break it in. Each have their own different method. The one guy I trust told me to do it twice before I start the driving break in period. Do you use break in oil? What I've been told the best way to go is just to use oil with no detergents or additives and mix in the ZDDP break in additive that Crane and Lucas make.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

well truth be told we only used the ford housing, the rest of the rear end was Strange products......

http://www.strangeengineering.net/

Nice. I want to do a nice axle build next. I really want to get to a point where I can build a vehicle for land speed runs at Bonneville. Have you ever had any experience with quick change rear ends?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Stercorarius said:

Nice. I want to do a nice axle build next. I really want to get to a point where I can build a vehicle for land speed runs at Bonneville. Have you ever had any experience with quick change rear ends?

waste of money don't bother...... by the way, the flat tappet lifters need to rotate in the lifter bore to get an even wear pattern. So, very important on a flat tappet cam. Spring pressure can be too high and not allow the lifters to rotate in the bore during break-in. don't run dual springs, keep pressure reduced on the lifters during break-in. Also, no synthetic oil for break-in. Before the installation of the cam and lifters, do not soak or pump up the hydraulic lifters! This can make the lifter lock up and cause more problems setting a pre-load into the lifters

Link to comment
Share on other sites

waste of money don't bother...... by the way, the flat tappet lifters need to rotate in the lifter bore to get an even wear pattern. So, very important on a flat tappet cam. Spring pressure can be too high and not allow the lifters to rotate in the bore during break-in. don't run dual springs, keep pressure reduced on the lifters during break-in. Also, no synthetic oil for break-in. Before the installation of the cam and lifters, do not soak or pump up the hydraulic lifters! This can make the lifter lock up and cause more problems setting a pre-load into the lifters

Both of you guys say this, but it contradicts everything I've been told by several people. Everyone has told me to prime the lifters in a bucket of oil, even on a new cam and lifters, and then run the oil pump with a drill to prelube everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, Stercorarius said:

Wait, how does he propose you pime your hydraulic flat tappet lifters? Just use an oil pump primer? The motor is basically done. I just need to check the clearance on the rocker arms and break it in. I've had quite a bit of guys tell me how to break it in. Each have their own different method. The one guy I trust told me to do it twice before I start the driving break in period. Do you use break in oil? What I've been told the best way to go is just to use oil with no detergents or additives and mix in the ZDDP break in additive that Crane and Lucas make.

You use an oil pump primer. For engine oil we used shell rotella T oil. It is a diesel oil and contains zinc in it. That's what we have always ran on all of our trucks and cars in our entire family that use flat tappet lifters. You want to run the priming tool until oil comes out of each rocker arm so none are dry on start up. You will want to hold the engine at 2300 to 2600 rpms for about half an hour and don't hold it at a steady rpm either. You need to rev it up to keep the lifters spinning to get the wear pattern set. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You use an oil pump primer. For engine oil we used shell rotella T oil. It is a diesel oil and contains zinc in it. That's what we have always ran on all of our trucks and cars in our entire family that use flat tappet lifters. You want to run the priming tool until oil comes out of each rocker arm so none are dry on start up. You will want to hold the engine at 2300 to 2600 rpms for about half an hour and don't hold it at a steady rpm either. You need to rev it up to keep the lifters spinning to get the wear pattern set. 

I've heard to use diesel oil before too. I don't know if you saw the vid I did with the proto slide hammer where I destroyed the distributor, but what I was doing was pulling out the shaft to use as an oil pump primer. I know about the 2300 to 2600 range, but I've heard some guys tell me that varying in that range sets a better wear pattern and I've heard from other guys that just zip tying the throttle and letting it sit steady at that rpm sets the wear pattern better. Thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Member Statistics

    17,325
    Total Members
    6,555
    Most Online
    JohnB
    Newest Member
    JohnB
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...