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Fuel, or brushed milwaukee m18 circ saw?


mike_dave

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Hey Gang,

 

I am planning on buying a cordless circ saw for my kit and am debating between the 6-1/2" fuel saw, and the standard Milwaukee brushed circular saw.

aside from the increased performance from the fuel, the rafter hook is quite appealing.. I'm not sure if that's going to be overkill for my needs, plus here in Canada I believe the price difference is about 100 bucks, and well for that much I could go buy myself another tool ;)

for those of you who have each of these saws what are your thoughts? do you regret your purchase and wish you went the other way?

 

Mike

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I have been debating this also. The big factor is how often you will use it. The prices I found seem to be around 99 for brushed and 199 for fuel. I don't use a circular saw all that often so I can't justify paying twice the money

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Brushless is great, but the benefits of a brushless motor don't apply to all tools equally.

A saw needs a good blade more than a brushless motor. The battery life will be better, but only marginally.

Heavy load tools will see much more of a benefit from a brushless motor.

A circular saw will be great with or without a brushless motor. Brushed motors are less susceptible to dirt and debris as well.

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1 minute ago, HiltiWpg said:

Brushless is great, but the benefits of a brushless motor don't apply to all tools equally.

A saw needs a good blade more than a brushless motor. The battery life will be better, but only marginally.

Heavy load tools will see much more of a benefit from a brushless motor.

A circular saw will be great with or without a brushless motor. Brushed motors are less susceptible to dirt and debris as well.

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well then it came in handy while I was taper cutting wet fresh 2x4 end for end......2 stories up while leveling ceiling joists before sheet rock.....I could tell how wet the wood was one from another just by the sound of the motor while cutting........

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I'm not sure about the RPM. It has significantly more power/torque than any brushed saw that I know of.

The brushless motor delivers higher rpms, that's one of the disadvantages of a brushed motor, high friction means lower rpm.

I am not sure that torque really applies to a circular saw. If you are pushing the tool into the wood that hard, you are doing it wrong!

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59 minutes ago, HiltiWpg said:

M18 3500 rpm, M18 Fuel 5000 rpm. No torque ratings, which makes sense.

There ya go, thanks google!

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torque comes into play at a certain point though, otherwise once you hit OSB the blade will just stop, i know thats extreme example...

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I had Milwaukee brushed circular 2630 and I used it a month. I replaced it to Fuel. And I would say it's so cool and powerfull.
Build quality is also much better in Fuel model.
 

Important to say that if you have time - look for special offers, you can buy saw much lower then RRP

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8 hours ago, HiltiWpg said:

The brushless motor delivers higher rpms, that's one of the disadvantages of a brushed motor, high friction means lower rpm.

I am not sure that torque really applies to a circular saw. If you are pushing the tool into the wood that hard, you are doing it wrong!

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Whilst it's true that the term 'torque' is not readily used for circular saws, it absolutely applies. torque is simply how much force is applied at a given distance/radius. you can find electric saws with far more power but little extra RPM, because the no-load RPM is meaningless without the grunt to back it up.

the FUEL grinder is another good example. It has only 9000RPM, compared to many brushed 18v grinders with 10,000RPM. But the FUEL smashes them because when you apply load, the RPM doesn't drop nearly as much.

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8 hours ago, HiltiWpg said:

I am not sure that torque really applies to a circular saw. If you are pushing the tool into the wood that hard, you are doing it wrong!

 

If you want to cut fast, you need the power to do it. Ask a carpenter to cut OSB or LVLs all day on a cheap cordless saw and see what he/she thinks...

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12 hours ago, HiltiWpg said:

The brushless motor delivers higher rpms, that's one of the disadvantages of a brushed motor, high friction means lower rpm.

I am not sure that torque really applies to a circular saw. If you are pushing the tool into the wood that hard, you are doing it wrong!

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hmm back in the day (I'm talking the 60's) my father used to say worm drive circular saws were best on the job site because they had more torque. If more torque was important then why would having a cordless saw be any different I realize these cordless brushless saw's are not worm drive but the more torque you have the better it is going to cut no? 

 

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hmm back in the day (I'm talking the 60's) my father used to say worm drive circular saws were best on the job site because they had more torque. If more torque was important then why would having a cordless saw be any different I realize these cordless brushless saw's are not worm drive but the more torque you have the better it is going to cut no? 

 

Oh for sure.

Torque in any motor is important.

For circular saws, you aren't running them under constant and varying loads like an impact or drill.

They spin. Sometimes they bog a little and a beefier motor is great to have. With a good blade and proper use of the tool, the torque requirements aren't that crazy.

As for the worm drive, they don't bind up like a direct drive because they are geared. Direct drive can stop the blade much easier when it binds. Worm drives by design, are very hard to stop. Not because of brushless or brushed motors, but the gearing. The are beasts!

Just wait for an M18 Fuel Wormdrive!

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