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Shop Walls...


Dano123

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As most of you know from my other thread I am in the process of organizing my garage shop.  I was 2/3's of the way done until tonight when I decided to move my shelf/bench I made 11 years ago.  Behind the shelf there are a couple holes I forgot were there from an old bathroom medicine cabinet the previous owner had in the wall (no idea why???) and water damage (I let my roof leak way longer than I should have).  I am trying to decide whether to patch the drywall or cover all or part of the wall with OSB.  I plan to move my band saw, drill press and mechanic tool cart against that wall and I feel like the osb will give me more flexibility on future shelves or french cleats. 

 

What did you guys use for your shop walls and are you happy or wish you had something else?

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Yeah that was a pretty sweet video, I saw that somewhere before, maybe you even posted that somewhere else? You have the right idea. Drywall won't stand up to any abuse you throw at it like planks will. That's why I'm not putting drywall up in my new mudroom addition. I think I'll use t1-11 instead. Which might be another option for you dano, it would look nicer than osb probably

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It's not insulated, just drywalled. T1-11 is around 25 to 30 per sheet, 7/16 osb is 10. I am going for function more than fashion since it's my work shop.

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There you go, I do that a lot, function over fashion.

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Moving the shelf opened up a hole in my wall that was way worse than I thought.  My sill plate is rotted along with the bottom of my studs, the backer board and the wood siding.  I guess I am glad I found it now before I covered the wall in osb.  That electrical outlet was a mess, I put a double gang box and 2 outlets in today.  Protool its not mold, its the black back side of the backer board that goes behind the wood siding.  After I dig out the foundation and put in a treated 2x8 along the bottom outside it should be ok. I am going to cut the studs and scab in a piece of 4x4 as a new sill plate. The whole wall is loose when you hit it. its not really weight bearing luckily. Now that I have to tear out even more of my drywall I am going to do OSB for sure. I hate finishing drywall and OSB will allow me to open the wall up again easily if I ever need to.

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Just trying to pass on info.....I would never thought of putting the tin on the underside oh the roof or white washing the trusses.

At one point I was going to put tin on my garage walls but know I have a good blueprint of what I like. Now to collect the wood and find the time...lol

DeWalt

Keep up the progress Dano.....looking forward to more pics. [emoji12]

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176a2f88a4fd76755a747d7900a966b1.jpg5d57a24f17e42277e3fd1b43366c0d15.jpg

I planned to paint it this spring, I never see that and didn't realize it go so bad. Out of sight out of mind. It's my dog's yard. That piece of drywall fits perfectly right?

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I am going to cover that wall with OSB, I used that scrap piece to fill the gap.  Hopefully I will have that wall and the ceiling done tomorrow afternoon. My next project is to organize my lights, they are randomly placed all over my garage and it drives me crazy. 

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Expanda Foam is your friend for cracks and gaps. I replaced the rotted siding board with a 1x12 I had laying around and once I paint it I am going to back fill.  There is concrete in the corner where my garage wall hits the house so that will be a pain. No one can see that corner so I am not worried about it being perfect. 

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When using OSB as a wall covering, it can be a good idea to coat any raw edges of the panels, that sit near the floor, with polyurethane. This will help control moisture draw  into the panels and expansion of the bottom edge thickness. Also make sure to leave at least a 1/2" gap at the base of the wall for similar reasons.

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Due to the nature of OSB and particle board products in general, it is always a good idea to seal any exposed edges. I once performed a quick test on a board product that I was using in the shop, by using different materials to cover the edges and them dropping it into a bucket of water for a short bit. Suffice to say, there was a world of difference in how the product performed compared to an untreated edge. Any exposed raw edge of that type of board product will draw moisture if left unprotected.

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