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Shredded Diablo Blade


JimboS1ice

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Made 1 cut and this is the result, now did I cut it like an asshole, ya I cut it full throttle so shame on me, but to shred 5 teeth of their carbide after 1 cut. So I posted this on Instagram and Diablo reached out to me which is cool of them even though it's partly operated error. Feedback I've got though a lot of people have never seen this with their blade... what do you guys think, do I blame the ridgid sawzall I never use or my eager thumb to tear through some metal?

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So these blades are an absolute godsend as diablo rightfully points out in some of their demos, but they're also very finicky.  I never in my life thought I would be babying a sawzall or blade but I do now and it's totally worth it.

 

The carbide teeth are incredibly prone to chipping and once you chip more than a little bit off of one the adjacent teeth chip pretty quickly too and the entire blade is shot.  When you look at sawzall blades they're actually angled forward a bit which means if you run them too fast/without enough pressure the blade bounces in the cut a little and every time it lands the teeth chip a little.  That's especially bad when it's a thin workpiece like the frame of a couch and it focuses all that impact on only a couple teeth.  The angle thing is great for digging into the cut and counteracts the looseness of sawzall blade holders (otherwise the blade would be angled the other way) and bouncing doesn't damage bimetal blades but it kills carbide.

 

The second worst thing is when you finish a cut and the blade hits something as it falls through.  This is why the milwaukee ax wins over diablo carbide in demos where they have to cut a series of free nails because the blade falls from one nail to the next and breaks teeth (see the video below).

 

As far as the couch, I think those are some pretty hard steel because I burnt up a milwaukee torch blade cutting through one.  Unfortunately the diablo carbide blades didn't exist yet.

 

I'm glad you brought this up because I've seen a lot of people kill these blades because you just don't expect to put effort into making a smooth cut with a sawzall and most don't even think to try using it differently.  I used these to cut stock for a week while both shop bandsaws were broken and it's really hard to explain to people that a sawzall needs to be used as a precision tool.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dd7fF1jRII

 

 

You can see why I didn't want to type all this into the instagram box :P 

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So these blades are an absolute godsend as diablo rightfully points out in some of their demos, but they're also very finicky.  I never in my life thought I would be babying a sawzall or blade but I do now and it's totally worth it.

 

The carbide teeth are incredibly prone to chipping and once you chip more than a little bit off of one the adjacent teeth chip pretty quickly too and the entire blade is shot.  When you look at sawzall blades they're actually angled forward a bit which means if you run them too fast/without enough pressure the blade bounces in the cut a little and every time it lands the teeth chip a little.  That's especially bad when it's a thin workpiece like the frame of a couch and it focuses all that impact on only a couple teeth.  The angle thing is great for digging into the cut and counteracts the looseness of sawzall blade holders (otherwise the blade would be angled the other way) and bouncing doesn't damage bimetal blades but it kills carbide.

 

The second worst thing is when you finish a cut and the blade hits something as it falls through.  This is why the milwaukee ax wins over diablo carbide in demos where they have to cut a series of free nails because the blade falls from one nail to the next and breaks teeth (see the video below).

 

As far as the couch, I think those are some pretty hard steel because I burnt up a milwaukee torch blade cutting through one.  Unfortunately the diablo carbide blades didn't exist yet.

 

I'm glad you brought this up because I've seen a lot of people kill these blades because you just don't expect to put effort into making a smooth cut with a sawzall and most don't even think to try using it differently.  I used these to cut stock for a week while both shop bandsaws were broken and it's really hard to explain to people that a sawzall needs to be used as a precision tool.

 



 

 

You can see why I didn't want to type all this into the instagram box [emoji14] 



Great thoughts Jeff, the carbide actually seems brittle and it makes sense being the chipped teeth are not right against where they shoe was. I've posted some stuff on IG with another blade and the fuel sawzall and it didn't shred, metal could have been different as well as the RIDGID saw too, but I'm glad Diablo is sending me a replacement and they want a better look at the one I mucked up, maybe we will see a better product next round, good post!


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