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Ryobi Log Splitter Hydraulic Valve?


JeremyB

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Hello - just arrived here and hoping someone may be able to help.  I have a Ryobi ELS-52 log splitter.  It has not been used for about 10 months and today when I came to use it I found that the ram does not return after splitting a log.  To get the ram to return I have to hold down the hydraulic control lever briefly and then let it go, after which the ram will go back to its normal position.

 

The splitter is being operated in a fairly level position, and the bleed screw is loosened.  The oil level is about halfway between the marks on the dipstick.  There is no sign of oil leakage.

 

I assume the hydraulic control lever operates a valve, and I'm guessing that maybe this valve has become 'sticky'.  On the opposite side of the casting to the projecting piece operated by the hydraulic control lever there is a fairly large nut.  Does anyone know if I can change the valve assembly by removing this nut?  If so, would I need to drain the oil first?  Any other thoughts much appreciated.  Thanks.  J.

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3 hours ago, JeremyB said:

Hello - just arrived here and hoping someone may be able to help.  I have a Ryobi ELS-52 log splitter.  It has not been used for about 10 months and today when I came to use it I found that the ram does not return after splitting a log.  To get the ram to return I have to hold down the hydraulic control lever briefly and then let it go, after which the ram will go back to its normal position.

 

The splitter is being operated in a fairly level position, and the bleed screw is loosened.  The oil level is about halfway between the marks on the dipstick.  There is no sign of oil leakage.

 

I assume the hydraulic control lever operates a valve, and I'm guessing that maybe this valve has become 'sticky'.  On the opposite side of the casting to the projecting piece operated by the hydraulic control lever there is a fairly large nut.  Does anyone know if I can change the valve assembly by removing this nut?  If so, would I need to drain the oil first?  Any other thoughts much appreciated.  Thanks.  J.

Pictures please. Before you do anything make sure there isn't any hydraulic pressure on it.

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Two photos attached. The first shows the lever operating the valve and the second shows the large nut on the opposite side of the casing.  I assume that if the electric pump isn't running and the ram is in its non-extended position there shouldn't be any hydraulic pressure on it.  J.Lever Operating Valve.JPGNut on opposite side of casing.JPG

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To be honest this is outside of my realm of hydraulic repairs. I recommend bringing it to a factory service center and having it worked on by qualified trained professionals. I recommend not following the following instructions and am not responsible for any injury, loss or other damage to the equipment if you choose to go by the following list of what I would do on my own personal equipment. First thing I would do is check if it is under warranty. If it isn't then I would start into this. That nut on the other side appears to be a plug and not for any sort of retention. This is where I would have to drain the hydraulic fluid (I would assume and am not sure). With the motor off and power disconnected toggle the lever between its extend and retract position to relieve hydraulic pressure on the supply side of the valve body. The block you are referring to as the valve body isn't actually the valve body. I would remove the bolt retaining the lever to the block and pull it off. The price that it presses on is the actual valve assembly and the one below it is your adjustment screw. I would assume the valve retract spring is bad. To remove the valve may be one of several ways. I would assume ( once again these are all assumptions ) I could pull it out by unscrewing the whole thing with an alan wrench on the head or equally likely there is a snap ring around the circumference of it or possibly even both. If there isn't an exterior way to remove it, I would have to pull off the four fasteners on the black face of that block where the lever is located in order to pull that whole plate and block off and remove the valve core from the inside. This is unlikely however.

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Thanks Stercorarius.  I much appreciate the time and thought that you have given to this matter.

 

I would be inclined to agree with you about taking the log splitter to a factory service centre, but bearing in mind that it is out of warranty and its cost when new was only a little over £200 (about $260 at the moment with the Pound low against the Dollar) it seems likely that the repair cost might be sufficiently high for it to be better for me to purchase a new machine. 

 

I've found some exploded diagrams and it appears - I can't be sure - that the nut on the other side possibly may provide access to the hydraulic valve assembly.  The hydraulic fluid drains from the other end of the machine.

 

I've also found a UK company that can supply a complete valve assembly for not much over £20.  I've sent them an email asking if that assembly is reasonably straightforward to replace.

 

I'm taking everything step-by-step.  I'll post here again when/if I can get any further.

 

Cheers,

 

Jeremy

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