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Paddles, Self-feeds, Augers, Hole Saw


tpamatmat

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So I have been roughing in a lot of electrical/plumbing lately. Over the years I have just kind of settled in on a workflow, roughly 1/8" or a bit more than the O.D. and the type of bit that made the most sense. Never did any real testing though, so I am curious if you guys are similar.

 

Copper Pipe:

1/2"-  3/4" Milwaukee self-feed auger. In the past I used Irwin Speedbors but with hard studs(old) the threaded tip tend to strip out of the wood pulling three drill flutes through. This is not an issue with Milwaukee's 2 fluted design.

3/4" - 1" Milwaukee self-feed auger.

1" -    1 1/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed. Love this bit.

 

Iron Pipe:

1/2" - 1" Milwaukee self-feed auger.

3/4" - 1 1/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed.

1" -     1 1/2" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed, 1 3/8" if I have to go through a load bearing wall(really only happened once, there is almost always a workaround).

 

ABS:

1 1/4" - In the past a 1 3/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed. Now I use Blue boars tungsten carbide tipped (TCT) hole saws. Much less mess and a lot easier(batteries and load) on a cordless drill, great bits.

1 1/2"- Same as above, self-feed in the past now I use 2 1/8" Blue boars TCT's. I can stay with my cordless without breaking out my corded hole hawg.

2" - 2 1/2" Blue boar TCT, I should craigslist the hole hawg but it comes in handy mixing thinset.

3" - 3 5/8" Blue boar TCT

4" - 4 5/8" Blue boar TCT

 

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5 hours ago, JimboS1ice said:

I agreee the speedbores are nice but I too prefer the two fluted design of the Milwaukee


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Yeah, they are great bits. I have a few paddle bits floating around in my bag for that odd sized hole, but for any size that I drill time and again...its Milwaukee self-feed augers.

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I have yet to be impressed with a Milwaukee accessory. Their Sawzall blades suck, very surprising since they own the name and all. Hole saws are mediocre. And driver bits are plain awful.

Lennox blows them away on the sawblade front. Their augers rock too. Ideal makes a decent 2 blade auger as well.

Just my opinion but I haven't given them a chance in that department in quite a while. This is also coming from a Milwaukee fan

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I'm looking at getting some Big Hawgs. The switchblades are nice too. Hole dozers aren't bad but I don't care for any bi-metal hole saws really. Augers and general drilling I'm completely sold on Wood Owl. Bosch is reasonable as well; daredevil paddles. I'm looking at grabbing a few Nailkillers to try. With SBD acquisition of Irwin/Lenox I would expect Dewalt accessories to be on par with the aforementioned brands.  

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On 2/8/2017 at 3:28 AM, tpamatmat said:

So I have been roughing in a lot of electrical/plumbing lately. Over the years I have just kind of settled in on a workflow, roughly 1/8" or a bit more than the O.D. and the type of bit that made the most sense. Never did any real testing though, so I am curious if you guys are similar.

 

Copper Pipe:

1/2"-  3/4" Milwaukee self-feed auger. In the past I used Irwin Speedbors but with hard studs(old) the threaded tip tend to strip out of the wood pulling three drill flutes through. This is not an issue with Milwaukee's 2 fluted design.

3/4" - 1" Milwaukee self-feed auger.

1" -    1 1/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed. Love this bit.

 

Iron Pipe:

1/2" - 1" Milwaukee self-feed auger.

3/4" - 1 1/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed.

1" -     1 1/2" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed, 1 3/8" if I have to go through a load bearing wall(really only happened once, there is almost always a workaround).

 

ABS:

1 1/4" - In the past a 1 3/4" Milwaukee switchblade self-feed. Now I use Blue boars tungsten carbide tipped (TCT) hole saws. Much less mess and a lot easier(batteries and load) on a cordless drill, great bits.

1 1/2"- Same as above, self-feed in the past now I use 2 1/8" Blue boars TCT's. I can stay with my cordless without breaking out my corded hole hawg.

2" - 2 1/2" Blue boar TCT, I should craigslist the hole hawg but it comes in handy mixing thinset.

3" - 3 5/8" Blue boar TCT

4" - 4 5/8" Blue boar TCT

 

 

I do a lot of rough in plumbing (surprise) and had the exact thought process where before I used to use self feed bits on dwv (PVC in my case)  and now use hole cutters, specifically milwaukee big hawgs.

 

I haven't used self feed of that size for ages and happy never going back,

They require more power, more load, bigger drills, etc etc

Ever try enlarging a hole with chipper bits? Yeah not fun. I could do it all day with hole cutters

Hit a nail or even a screw? Done. just pack up for the day.  A hole saw cuts out only the kerf of the tooth, or straddles it

THE MESS, yeah hole saws/cutters make some too, but it's mainly just plugs of wood to pick up.

I do quite a few remodel plumbing jobs, it's 10x worse going through old native OAK joists with chipper bits than pine. Nope.

 

For going through metal siding or roofing with pipe, i use Lenox bimetal, they are outstanding, take it slow and they will eat right through. But make sure the teeth are "raking" across the surface of the metal, by tipping the drill the right angle, you can avoid having the incoming teeth tear and grab at the metal, if that makes sense

For PEX water lines, I use irwin speedbor max but from what @JimboS1ice and now yourself have experienced, I need to try the Milwaukee screw bits for 1"holes and under

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I do a lot of rough in plumbing (surprise) and had the exact thought process where before I used to use self feed bits on dwv (PVC in my case)  and now use hole cutters, specifically milwaukee big hawgs.
 
I haven't used self feed of that size for ages and happy never going back,
They require more power, more load, bigger drills, etc etc
Ever try enlarging a hole with chipper bits? Yeah not fun. I could do it all day with hole cutters
Hit a nail or even a screw? Done. just pack up for the day.  A hole saw cuts out only the kerf of the tooth, or straddles it
THE MESS, yeah hole saws/cutters make some too, but it's mainly just plugs of wood to pick up.
I do quite a few remodel plumbing jobs, it's 10x worse going through old native OAK joists with chipper bits than pine. Nope.
 
For going through metal siding or roofing with pipe, i use Lenox bimetal, they are outstanding, take it slow and they will eat right through. But make sure the teeth are "raking" across the surface of the metal, by tipping the drill the right angle, you can avoid having the incoming teeth tear and grab at the metal, if that makes sense
For PEX water lines, I use irwin speedbor max but from what [mention=51951]JimboS1ice[/mention] and now yourself have experienced, I need to try the Milwaukee screw bits for 1"holes and under

2704 handles the speedbores no problem but you can run the milwaukees on smaller drills without difficulties


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7 minutes ago, JimboS1ice said:


2704 handles the speedbores no problem but you can run the milwaukees on smaller drills without difficulties


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Yep, the DCD791 can handle the speedbor max no problem as well but I'd be scared to hit a nail without a side handle lol. 

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43 minutes ago, JimboS1ice said:


2704 handles the speedbores no problem but you can run the milwaukees on smaller drills without difficulties


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34 minutes ago, Bremon said:

Yep, the DCD791 can handle the speedbor max no problem as well but I'd be scared to hit a nail without a side handle lol. 

 

But that's just through pine. Old oak on the other hand....

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2 hours ago, Bremon said:

Augers and general drilling I'm completely sold on Wood Owl. Bosch is reasonable as well; daredevil paddles. 

Never tried the Wood owls, I will have to order one and try it out. I agree on the daredevil paddles, that's all I have. I mean do I want a standard paddle or one that is self-feeding? Self-feeding of course.

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1 hour ago, KnarlyCarl said:

 

I do a lot of rough in plumbing (surprise) and had the exact thought process where before I used to use self feed bits on dwv (PVC in my case)  and now use hole cutters, specifically milwaukee big hawgs.

 

I haven't used self feed of that size for ages and happy never going back,

They require more power, more load, bigger drills, etc etc

Ever try enlarging a hole with chipper bits? Yeah not fun. I could do it all day with hole cutters

Hit a nail or even a screw? Done. just pack up for the day.  A hole saw cuts out only the kerf of the tooth, or straddles it

THE MESS, yeah hole saws/cutters make some too, but it's mainly just plugs of wood to pick up.

I do quite a few remodel plumbing jobs, it's 10x worse going through old native OAK joists with chipper bits than pine. Nope.

 

For going through metal siding or roofing with pipe, i use Lenox bimetal, they are outstanding, take it slow and they will eat right through. But make sure the teeth are "raking" across the surface of the metal, by tipping the drill the right angle, you can avoid having the incoming teeth tear and grab at the metal, if that makes sense

For PEX water lines, I use irwin speedbor max but from what @JimboS1ice and now yourself have experienced, I need to try the Milwaukee screw bits for 1"holes and under

 

Yeah...so nice to leave that heavy ass Hole Hawg in the truck. I have a set of the big hawgs also, but the teeth are just hardened steel (there's a reason they give you a diamond sharpener in the set). Give the blue boars a try, the teeth are tungsten carbide. Haven't had to touch them up once since I bought them.

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3 minutes ago, tpamatmat said:

 

Yeah...so nice to leave that heavy ass Hole Hawg in the truck. I have a set of the big hawgs also, but the teeth are just hardened steel (there's a reason they give you a diamond sharpener in the set). Give the blue boars a try, the teeth are tungsten carbide. Haven't had to touch them up once since I bought them.

Thanks, I knew the teeth were not carbide, always looking for recommendations on this, I had got my big hawgs before I really knew what was available.

I was contemplating the Spyder brand at Lowes, ever have experience with them. Right off the bat, i'm going to assume the Blue Boar are better, but that's just the typical Lowes stereotype ha

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Thanks, I knew the teeth were not carbide, always looking for recommendations on this, I had got my big hawgs before I really knew what was available.
I was contemplating the Spyder brand at Lowes, ever have experience with them. Right off the bat, i'm going to assume the Blue Boar are better, but that's just the typical Lowes stereotype ha

New spiders they have at menards look awesome, the quick shank is pretty slick too, full set is 199, wouldn't be as a bad with an 11 percent off sale


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19 minutes ago, KnarlyCarl said:

Thanks, I knew the teeth were not carbide, always looking for recommendations on this, I had got my big hawgs before I really knew what was available.

I was contemplating the Spyder brand at Lowes, ever have experience with them. Right off the bat, i'm going to assume the Blue Boar are better, but that's just the typical Lowes stereotype ha

 

I have heard good things about the Spyder bits. Their teeth look a little thinner so they might be a touch more fragile but probably also cut faster with less torque needed. If you pick some up, I'd like to know how they compare to the big hawgs.

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24 minutes ago, tpamatmat said:

Never tried the Wood owls, I will have to order one and try it out. I agree on the daredevil paddles, that's all I have. I mean do I want a standard paddle or one that is self-feeding? Self-feeding of course.

Yeah, I once thought the Irwin were decent for the money (dollar a bit), but using the daredevil paddles was a "never again" moment for the Irwins lol. 

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Yeah, I once thought the Irwin were decent for the money (dollar a bit), but using the daredevil paddles was a "never again" moment for the Irwins lol. 

Speedbores are tough, I've hit light gauge metal and drilled through by accident and it's still sharp


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14 minutes ago, JimboS1ice said:


Speedbores are tough, I've hit light gauge metal and drilled through by accident and it's still sharp


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Yeah, they are good, selffeeds really spoil you though lol

 

 

Do any of you guys have experience with the daredevil version of Big Hawgs? Carbide like the FlexVolt ones but beefy for use on a ton of different materials. Can't find reviews anywhere and they are costly though. 

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Yeah, they are good, selffeeds really spoil you though lol
 
 
Do any of you guys have experience with the daredevil version of Big Hawgs? Carbide like the FlexVolt ones but beefy for use on a ton of different materials. Can't find reviews anywhere and they are costly though. 

Tia did a review a while back, believe it was an on site video


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12 hours ago, JimboS1ice said:


Tia did a review a while back, believe it was an on site video


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Just watched the video. Sort of tempted now. The FlexVolt would cut easier because it had smaller carbide, but they are all ballpark same price and Bosch goes through so many different materials, unlike @KnarlyCarl's experience with some brick and his Big Hawgs. 

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3 minutes ago, Bremon said:

Just watched the video. Sort of tempted now. The FlexVolt would cut easier because it had smaller carbide, but they are all ballpark same price and Bosch goes through so many different materials, unlike @KnarlyCarl's experience with some brick and his Big Hawgs. 

Yeah never been the same, I'm going to just take them to a pro sharpening service

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6 hours ago, Atlas2000 said:

Was unfamiliar with Blue Boar, but their metal cutting hole saws look awesome!

Yeah, they are nice bits. They really could use some help on the media front though. Great product but their web site looks like something I would put together and their brick and mortar distribution is a little weak. They just don't have  the appearance of a professional tool company even though their products are pro-grade.

 

We all appreciate a tool that performs well, but c'mon...sex sells:)

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