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I need a drill with guts


Whitey

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I need a drill that can handle a 6" hole saw. I work for a mechanical contractor and have to drill holes in metal roof decking. It's not often I need to drill a 6" hole but on occasion I must. I have a small Makita corded sds rotary hammer I've used for years in residential work, but it just isn't enough for the work I do now. It keeps clutching out on me just cutting through the foam of the roof deck before I even get to the metal. I admit that the drill is close to 10 years old and used hard, so I'm sure it's raged out witch doesn't help.any suggestions? 

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This is a task for a heavy duty right angle drill. The Milwaukee Hole Hawg, Super Hawg, Makita X2, and  DeWALT Flexvolt should have the torque to do a 6 in hole saw. The latest and greatest drill drivers/hammerdrill drivers might have the power but I am not for sure. If you already have a drill driver I would suggest getting the X2 since you have Makita stuff. 

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I would probably stick to a dedicated tool like a hole hawg if you want it to last.  A top tier hammer drill will do it, but it won't last as long.  I tried a 2nd gen Fuel first and it only lasted about 4 months before the transmission was trashed.  Switched to Makitas comparable drill and it has lasted almost 3 years but its definitely starting to get crunchy too. To me if I have to buy a new tool every 3 years its worth the convenience though.

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SDS, or rotary hammer, drills don't have rotational torque, it's just not part of what they're about. 

 

Any high voltage combi drill will almost certainly have the gumption to do what you're asking. Just be sure to get one with anti-kickback, your wrists will thank you!

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On 11/1/2018 at 9:15 PM, Whitey said:

metal roof decking

 

 

Most metal roofing profiles are around the 3mm thick mark, increase that for stiffening ribs and where the folds for the profile are introduced and you're going to spend a lot of time cutting these out with a 6" hole saw. Depending on the profile I'd probably prefer to use a jigsaw or if the sheet metal gauge is light enough, a punch nibbler that will allow you to follow the profile.

 

I've recently been working with 100mm profile roof deck and had to cut to end of 30mm holes into it and I was sick of it.

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On 11/6/2018 at 10:36 AM, SchenzhenSpecial said:

 

 

Most metal roofing profiles are around the 3mm thick mark, increase that for stiffening ribs and where the folds for the profile are introduced and you're going to spend a lot of time cutting these out with a 6" hole saw. Depending on the profile I'd probably prefer to use a jigsaw or if the sheet metal gauge is light enough, a punch nibbler that will allow you to follow the profile.

 

I've recently been working with 100mm profile roof deck and had to cut to end of 30mm holes into it and I was sick of it.

When you talk metal deck roof what exactly do you mean? There certainly aren't any metal deck roof sheets I've seen here in Australia that are >1mm in thickness let alone 3mm thickness? You wouldn't be able to lift the sheets.

 

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14 hours ago, method said:

When you talk metal deck roof what exactly do you mean? There certainly aren't any metal deck roof sheets I've seen here in Australia that are >1mm in thickness let alone 3mm thickness? You wouldn't be able to lift the sheets. 

 

 

Depends who's lifting them or how (crane/forks) but I mean structural metal deck roofing. There are a number of different brands with a wide range of gauges depending on load rating and span.

 

Most common one is Euroclad but I know Tata Steel do on, countless other brands. Some are 0.5mm + powder coat, some are 2mm + powder coat.

 

https://www.bimobject.com/en/tata-steel/product/roofdek-d153

www.euroclad.com/roofs/structural-decks/

 

metaldeck.jpg

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Formwork decking here for suspended slabs is a maximum of 1mm thick (the most common used) I just did a search online and found the thickest to be 1.27mm (American made). Like I said it would be unmanageable on a big site to be lifting 3mm sheets. If someone in .au can point a out a link to some specs of bondek type formwork that is >1.5mm it would be great.

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8 hours ago, method said:

Formwork decking here for suspended slabs is a maximum of 1mm thick (the most common used) I just did a search online and found the thickest to be 1.27mm (American made). Like I said it would be unmanageable on a big site to be lifting 3mm sheets. If someone in .au can point a out a link to some specs of bondek type formwork that is >1.5mm it would be great.

 

I must have been imagining it then.

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