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The Future of Power Tools


fm2176

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What advances and/or changes do you think we'll see in the design, format, or function and use of power tools over the next 50 or so years?  For some perspective, look at how far tools have come since 1973, and particularly in the past 15 years when it comes to cordless technology.  

 

I don't think corded tools will disappear, but as better tools and batteries are released, and as a younger and more tech savvy generation of professionals and DIY'ers replace their predecessors, I think that cordless will become even more of the norm.  We've seen Bluetooth compatible tools and batteries for a few years now, and there is talk about tools having to be activated at checkout to reduce thefts, so it'll be interesting to see what's in store.  

 

Personally, I think that batteries will continue to get more and more Ah, before seeing a vast reduction in size, perhaps with a newer battery type/chemistry.  I'll share more thoughts later, but what do you think will happen in the next 50 years?

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Wow, great question.  I agree, I think we will see a better battery in regards to power and weight.  I am sure some new chemistry along the way.  In regards to the tools, the only thing I can really see is a lighter material to make the tools lighter, along with a new type of motor but all that is way over my head.

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2 hours ago, Altan said:

Definitely they will push more WiFi and data connected tools and as soon as the 3 years warranty is finished the tool will stop working loooool

Built-in obsolescence...I can imagine that.  We already see the automotive industry moving away from the century-old norm of DIY repairs.  My neighbor was telling me that new Ford trucks require a computer to retract brake caliper pistons.  We've also seen the auto electric repair shops dying out; as a forklift mechanic I used to frequent those to have starters and alternators refurbished.

 

Back to tools: in the '90s we had a Black & Decker / DeWalt Service Center in Richmond, VA, where my boss would take the company's tools to get new brushes, chucks, or for other repairs.  It seems that increasingly, tools are designed to be replaced as opposed to repaired; I've had a few warranty repairs from DeWalt and Milwaukee but have also had tools simply replaced.  Manufacturers seem to have found a happy medium between eating the costs of warranty replacements and having customers pay to replace their tools every few years.

 

On 2/28/2023 at 8:25 AM, Eric - TIA said:

Wow, great question.  I agree, I think we will see a better battery in regards to power and weight.  I am sure some new chemistry along the way.  In regards to the tools, the only thing I can really see is a lighter material to make the tools lighter, along with a new type of motor but all that is way over my head.

If we look at the relative behemoths used 20 years ago, it's easy to imagine tools and batteries getting even smaller and lighter in the future, but at what point are the limits of practicality reached?  Ryobi is a good example of how much things have changed, considering their One+ system has been around for well over 20 years.  A Ryobi drill circa 2000 with its 1.3Ah Ni-Cad battery is a brick compared to its modern equivalent sporting even a 4Ah Li-Ion battery.

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On 3/1/2023 at 2:34 PM, Eric - TIA said:

LOL on the tool that will stop working.  I do like the Hilti Nuron and think that technology is pretty cool and they can go in so many directions with that.

Time will show that.

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On 3/1/2023 at 4:11 PM, fm2176 said:

Built-in obsolescence...I can imagine that.  We already see the automotive industry moving away from the century-old norm of DIY repairs.  My neighbor was telling me that new Ford trucks require a computer to retract brake caliper pistons.  We've also seen the auto electric repair shops dying out; as a forklift mechanic I used to frequent those to have starters and alternators refurbished.

 

Back to tools: in the '90s we had a Black & Decker / DeWalt Service Center in Richmond, VA, where my boss would take the company's tools to get new brushes, chucks, or for other repairs.  It seems that increasingly, tools are designed to be replaced as opposed to repaired; I've had a few warranty repairs from DeWalt and Milwaukee but have also had tools simply replaced.  Manufacturers seem to have found a happy medium between eating the costs of warranty replacements and having customers pay to replace their tools every few years.

 

If we look at the relative behemoths used 20 years ago, it's easy to imagine tools and batteries getting even smaller and lighter in the future, but at what point are the limits of practicality reached?  Ryobi is a good example of how much things have changed, considering their One+ system has been around for well over 20 years.  A Ryobi drill circa 2000 with its 1.3Ah Ni-Cad battery is a brick compared to its modern equivalent sporting even a 4Ah Li-Ion battery.

I do not like to make everything computerised!

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