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The new Hilti 5.2 AH battery.


HiltiWpg

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9e9b786bf70c18269d35d577362b56f4.jpgfb3989164159626ce4ae19aaf382ad1f.jpgI picked up a couple of these new batteries. So far, I am impressed. Spent the day drilling and tapping steel, installing some equipment to steel 1/8" frame and medium gauge steel, driving self tappers etc...

Not exactly a workout, but a decent day.

I used 2 freshly charged 5.2's and by the end of the day, my impact is at 4 bars, the drill is at 3 bars. Damn.

112 watts for the 5.2ah, very impressed. Same size and weight as the 3.3ah. Compared to a Milwaukee 5.0ah (90 watts) it's a noticeable difference in runtime. My Fuel hammer drill / driver wasn't nearly as nice on battery life with almost 40% less torque.

According to Hilti, the batteries will increase overall power/torque as well.

If there had to be a negative, it makes the charger get warmer than charging a 3.3 ah.

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I used 2 freshly charged 5.2's and by the end of the day, my impact is at 4 bars, the drill is at 3 bars. Damn.

112 watts for the 5.2ah, very impressed. Same size and weight as the 3.3ah. Compared to a Milwaukee 5.0ah (90 watts) it's a noticeable difference in runtime.

 

You mean Watt hours (Wh), 112 Watts would be a very weak drill. Watts is an instantaneous measure of power.

 

Watts hours are a measure of total juice, and the formula is just voltage x Ah.

 

Wow, the tool is 21.6V. It must have an extra cell per layer (i.e. 12 cells instead of 10). Of course those are just specs. The efficiency of the drill and electronics of the system could also be contributing to superior runtime.

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You mean Watt hours (Wh), 112 Watts would be a very weak drill. Watts is an instantaneous measure of power.

Watts hours are a measure of total juice, and the formula is just voltage x Ah.

Wow, the tool is 21.6V. It must have an extra cell per layer (i.e. 12 cells instead of 10). Of course those are just specs. The efficiency of the drill and electronics of the system could also be contributing to superior runtime.

I hope no one was confused, I specified amp hours. I just assume most understand battery capacity, my bad.

And yes, Hilti does have an additional cell.

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I hope no one was confused, I specified amp hours. I just assume most understand battery capacity, my bad.

And yes, Hilti does have an additional cell.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I think most around here understand that Amp hours (Ah) are a measure of battery capacity. But in fact, they are only a measure of battery capacity for a given voltage (most often 18v). A 10Ah battery on a 6V tool would still have far less total juice than your Hilti.

 

I was actually correcting your use of the term '112 Watts'. The battery is not 112W, but 112 Watt hours in capacity (21.6V x 5.2 Ah = 112Wh)

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9e9b786bf70c18269d35d577362b56f4.jpgfb3989164159626ce4ae19aaf382ad1f.jpgI picked up a couple of these new batteries. So far, I am impressed. Spent the day drilling and tapping steel, installing some equipment to steel 1/8" frame and medium gauge steel, driving self tappers etc...

Not exactly a workout, but a decent day.

I used 2 freshly charged 5.2's and by the end of the day, my impact is at 4 bars, the drill is at 3 bars. Damn.

112 watts for the 5.2ah, very impressed. Same size and weight as the 3.3ah. Compared to a Milwaukee 5.0ah (90 watts) it's a noticeable difference in runtime. My Fuel hammer drill / driver wasn't nearly as nice on battery life with almost 40% less torque.

According to Hilti, the batteries will increase overall power/torque as well.

If there had to be a negative, it makes the charger get warmer than charging a 3.3 ah.

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

That is some pretty awesome runtime. It is crazy to me how much they can get out of these things anymore.

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

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If the batteries can deliver more current (i.e higher voltage becouse of less internal resistance), the torque and power ratings will go up.
And I guess in Hilti's situation, that might be the case.

Its not unlikey becouse a larger battery will normally have less internal resistance. But an exception is when they just increases the cell capacity. Then all bets are off. But either way, this might very well be true.

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According to my rep, the battery design has improved, the connectors are beefier, the electronics have improved. Could just be better overall average power/torque from the new cells. I can't say I noticed any difference myself.

Hilti doesn't make wild marketing claims like everyone else does so I am inclined to believe them.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I know what I said and apologized for any confusion. Did you really think I meant V*Ah=W and not Wh?

So thanks for feeling like you had to correct me a second time?

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

No offense intended. Just on your reply you didn't acknowledge the actual correction (W.h.). This being a forum, with many readers, I like to help people understand correctly, as others have often done for me.

 

It's all good!

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  • 3 weeks later...

How can a bigger battery give you more power/torque... More runtime I can understand ..

 

Milwaukee does this too with the XC batteries over the 2.0. you only get the full power from the XC batteries. Than again I'm thinking they throttled the 2.0 batteries so they last longer is all. I may be wrong just a guess.

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How can a bigger battery give you more power/torque... More runtime I can understand ..

 

An 18V slim battery has 5 cells inside. These cells are usually 3.6V and have a certain current (amperage) rating, say 20A. The battery pack becomes 18V by wiring them in series, 3.6V x 5 = 18V. The pack is thus 18V @ 20A.

 

A fat battery has two of these inside it, 2 rows of 5 cells, but the rows are wired in parallel. Thus you still have 18V, but you double the capacity (Ah) and you also increase (double?) the current that you can pull from the battery set, e.g. 40A.

 

Thus, a tool (if electronically configured) can pull different current (and thus power) from different batteries. The new 9Ah Milwaukee batteries should be able to pull more current again, because they will have 3 rows of cells in parallel.

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Milwaukee does this too with the XC batteries over the 2.0. you only get the full power from the XC batteries. Than again I'm thinking they throttled the 2.0 batteries so they last longer is all. I may be wrong just a guess.

 

Say rather that they limit the maximum current draw to prevent the cells inside from overheating. A 4Ah battery will only have to pull half the current from each individual cell compared to a 2Ah, to deliver the same power.

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