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Schaeffer Oil Products.


Jronman

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Anyone ever used Schaeffer Oil products? Our Pella window guy does Schaeffer oil demonstrations on the side and did a demo of the products at our work. Seemed like they were pretty good products. All the oil products were 100% synthetic. He compared to various other products. I know a few synthetics were compared to the Schaeffer and maybe some non synthetic as well. I can't remember exactly. The Schaeffer products in every test performed much better than the other guys. The Pella guy claimed he was able to increase the mpg on his vehicle by completely switching to all Schaeffer. Got his Tahoe to 19 mpg I would guess he got around 11 or so before. Said you will need to switch to a filter designed for synthetic oil. I didn't even know there was such a filter. There was also this biodegradable cleaner called Cirtol. It is basically oranges and a few other stuff. It seemed to do a great job at removing grease. It almost is like the CMT cleaner I got. Might have to compare the 2. The demonstration seemed pretty legit. Nothing that seemed to throw any red flags or make the Schaeffer products seem like a bunch of baloney.

 

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Every company has their flavor of mouse milk. Heard the exact same pitch from several brands. Boss believed the Hydrotex guy so now that's what we're using. Just don't use Pennzoil and you'll be fine. They're all salesman. Some oil is definitely better than others but at the end of the day those salesman will tell you anything you want to hear to make a sale.

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On 11/12/2017 at 3:34 PM, Stercorarius said:

Every company has their flavor of mouse milk. Heard the exact same pitch from several brands. Boss believed the Hydrotex guy so now that's what we're using. Just don't use Pennzoil and you'll be fine. They're all salesman. Some oil is definitely better than others but at the end of the day those salesman will tell you anything you want to hear to make a sale.

He had a machine designed to test oil and the Shaeffer products heated up less, made zero to no squealing like the other guys made. I even tried out the cleaner cause I got grease on my hand and it was legit. cleaned it with ease and no pumice required. 

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1 hour ago, Jronman said:

He had a machine designed to test oil and the Shaeffer products heated up less, made zero to no squealing like the other guys made. I even tried out the cleaner cause I got grease on my hand and it was legit. cleaned it with ease and no pumice required. 

Heard the same pitch a dozen times. Everyone gets trained to use the same sales tactics and half of them have barely any variation in pitch even between brands. Same our stuff is the best on the market and it had shown to increase blah blah blah and when compared to our competitor in a test of blah blah blah we can see an x% better let me level with you I use this stuff myself and it's all I'll ever use in fact we offer a gaurantee that yada yada yada and I'll personally make sure it gets taken care of and with our flexible financing your overhead is small and it will pay for itself in as little as x months it's what you buddies down the road are doing and the big guys will only use it at the new plant these guys switched over to our stuff exclusively look you can see for yourself with these carefully selected samples how great our stuff is when competitors don't offer truly pure product and it never ends. I'm sure it's good stuff, but I've got a 330000 mile engine that's running on whatever you or in it. I've driven million plus mile semis that are running cheapest conventional oil. The only accurate test for engine oil is an engine. They might even be the best but never go with whatever a salesman pitches their job is to sell their product.

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  • 1 month later...

I haven't used or seen their oil in the Pacific Northwest. Seems it's more in the Midwest. I myself am an Amsoil Dealer and have numerous years experience as an automotive mech/tech. From what I hear and test results through independent, 3rd party labs, is that they have a good product. Mobil 1 is also a good product. Most of the full synthetic motor oil on the market is decent to good, except royal purple. Just plain crap that stuff, can't even keep their API certification, which is already a low bar to jump over.

In today's modern vehicles, conventional and "synthetic blend" oils just don't cut it. Tolerances are tighter and engines are running far more hot than they used to. Those oils cannot withstand the heat nor lubricate the engine components properly. Those oils also fail to stay in a higher viscosity when the weather is super cold, which can damage the engine due to oil not reaching the pistons and cam before warming up.

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@Wally13 what do you suggest for a vehicle that isn't kept in a garage? My dad always said you should go start the vehicle when it is cold to let it warm up but whether the car is moving or not the pistons are still moving and the oil is still cold. I'm not sure what oil my car uses. I have a local guy work on my car.

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[mention=55328]Wally13[/mention] what do you suggest for a vehicle that isn't kept in a garage? My dad always said you should go start the vehicle when it is cold to let it warm up but whether the car is moving or not the pistons are still moving and the oil is still cold. I'm not sure what oil my car uses. I have a local guy work on my car.
That is a loaded question. It all depends on the engine. If you can let me know the year, make, model, and engine I can provide some more info for you.

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I'm old school use good old regular 10w40 in summer and 5w30 in winter, don't buy into this  synthetics just change your oil  at regular times  as for cold weather, we live in probably way colder area's in winter than most of the USA. we plug in our vehicles when its cold and that's it. not so much a problem now with fuel injection to flood a car/truck but in winter check your oil and if it smells like gas change it....

 

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2 hours ago, Wally13 said:

That is a loaded question. It all depends on the engine. If you can let me know the year, make, model, and engine I can provide some more info for you.

2008 Honda Civic LX Sedan. Automatic transmission. 1.8-liter, 140-hp i-VTEC four-cylinder engine

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2008 Honda Civic Sedan. Automatic transmission.
If you have the 1.8L engine, the oil is 5W-20. The 2.0L uses 5w-30. Letting the engine warm up is a thing of the past on modern vehicles. Fuel injection and oils eliminated the need to let the engine warm up to temperature as vacuum and a choke is no longer applicable. As far as cold temperatures, if it is below 0 degrees, the owners manual will tell you which viscosity of oil to use. Otherwise, just start your vehicle, let it idle for 30 seconds, then on your way.

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12 minutes ago, Nordraw said:

Full synthetic is the way to go for me. Nice to only change oil a couple of times a year instead of 4 times.  

My mechanic told me once every 6 months is enough. I am probably going to be averaging 1000 miles a year now since I am done with school.

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I may be thinking different than some of you that live in a warmer area year round bu  I know in the winter here hot and cold with steel causes condensation  regardless if you have synthetic oil or not. I've used this method for almost 50 years and hasn't failed me yet.....

 

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3 hours ago, Stercorarius said:

That a typo? At my old job I did twice that in a week.

Well I kinda guessed but I think 2000 is a more accurate number. I did some figuring and I figured that with my current schedule I average 2000. I'd say I average one long distance trip a year. My mechanic told me the other day I should drive my car more. I was having some starting issues and he thought lack of driving may be part of the issue. I tend to either not go much of anywhere or I am with my parents in their vehicle.

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On 11/12/2017 at 1:34 PM, Stercorarius said:

Just don't use Pennzoil and you'll be fine. They're all salesman. 

LOL, I had probably 400k miles running Pennzoil in my old Toyota and CJ5 (and current CJ7) with absolutely no oil issues. I did switch to Mobil 1 in my Expedition and the GF’s two Volvos. Most motor oil these days are pretty decent.

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On 1/12/2018 at 5:20 AM, BK13 said:

LOL, I had probably 400k miles running Pennzoil in my old Toyota and CJ5 (and current CJ7) with absolutely no oil issues. I did switch to Mobil 1 in my Expedition and the GF’s two Volvos. Most motor oil these days are pretty decent.

Fair enough. It all works. I've just had bad experiences with the stuff and carbon buildup. When looking for an explanation I was told it's because they go heavy on the graphite as an additive. 

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Molybdenum Disulfide is a fairly common lubricant. It functions as a dry lubricant similar to graphite. You see it a lot in high pressure applications because even with zero oil it still lubricates. It is a major component in Teflon. You see it a lot in EP greases more so than you see it advertised in oils. Moly assembly lube is very common once you start building engines. Moly and chrome are often used with each other. Hence chromoly piston rings that wear well. Think metal version of UHMW. Even a lot of tools are CrMo.

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On 1/13/2018 at 10:35 PM, Stercorarius said:

Fair enough. It all works. I've just had bad experiences with the stuff and carbon buildup. When looking for an explanation I was told it's because they go heavy on the graphite as an additive. 

Truth be told, I never opened either engine up to check for sludge. But they just kept working.

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