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Random Thought: M12 Fuel = M18?


n00b

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I wish that formula worked that easily. If you look at the stats of the m12 fuel hammer drill and the cheapest m18 drill, the m18 wins out. If I remember correctly the m18 has 150 lbs torque more than the m12 fuel. I had the same question you did when I bought my tools. I came to the comclusion that I need to buy the line/tools that works for me. I need a m18 hammer drill but an m12 fuel impact works for me.

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M18 still outperforms the M12 Fuel. That said, with a compact on the M18 and XC on the M12 the M12 would likely win on run time depending on how tough the job is, while still being lighter.

The 4.0 battery does put the run time, most likely better than, some of the m18 drills.

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One interesting fact beyond the torque and bpm is the speed. Both top out at 1700 rpm. That's a pretty big deal. I'd be interested in learning the UWO of both to do a full comparison. I bet they're closer than the torque numbers suggest. Either way, that M12 Fuel is a sweet sweet phaser.

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One interesting fact beyond the torque and bpm is the speed. Both top out at 1700 rpm.

 

But that is no-load speed. The second you put a load on the tool, the speed decreases, according to how much horsepower it has.

 

A 4Ah 12V battery contains 48 Watt Hours of power. A 2Ah 18V contains 36 Watt Hours. So the M12 should contain more 'gas' overall, as well as its efficiency gains from a brushless motor.

 

However, the task also matters. The M18 FUEL has SO MUCH more power than the M12 FUEL, it is advantaged in high-torque tests. In small diameter holes or screws, the smaller drills are advantaged.

 

(For reference your energy bill is usually charged per kilo (1000) Watt hours, about 25c in Australia)

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However, the task also matters. The M18 FUEL has SO MUCH more power than the M12 FUEL, it is advantaged in high-torque tests. In small diameter holes or screws, the smaller drills are advantaged.

I think the comparison being suggested is the m12 fuel vs the m18 (non-Fuel). It has to be pretty close. The downside is the advantage of m12 lineup is the size and the m12 fuel drill with an XC battery isn't much of a weight savings over an m18 non-fuel drill.

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I think the comparison being suggested is the m12 fuel vs the m18 (non-Fuel). It has to be pretty close. The downside is the advantage of m12 lineup is the size and the m12 fuel drill with an XC battery isn't much of a weight savings over an m18 non-fuel drill.

 

Yes I realised that, i was just trying to choose a larger power discrepancy to illustrate that point.

 

I personally guess that the M12 FUEL would win a runtime test against an M18 brushed compact with 2Ah battery, regardless of the test. But i bet it would get real close with a 3Ah battery on the M18 with a high-torque test.

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The downside is the advantage of m12 lineup is the size and the m12 fuel drill with an XC battery isn't much of a weight savings over an m18 non-fuel drill.

I disagree with this. When you're comparing things that weigh less than 5 lbs, even a 1 lb difference is noticeable, and adds up at the end of the day. Maybe that opinion comes from being 30 lbs less than most guys on the job site but I think most trades would agree the less you carry the better.
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I disagree with this. When you're comparing things that weigh less than 5 lbs, even a 1 lb difference is noticeable, and adds up at the end of the day. Maybe that opinion comes from being 30 lbs less than most guys on the job site but I think most trades would agree the less you carry the better.

 

1 pound isn't insignificant. Using the M12 4Ah battery would erode a little of this difference. 

 

But the grip and weighting of a drill are just as important to user comfort as weight. Slimmer handles require less squeezing to hold the drill, and balanced weighting avoids putting 'torque' on the hand (due to front-heaviness).

 

The M18 drills don't need to have the battery pack inside the handle, making them MUCH more comfortable in the hand (to me at least). Combine this with negligible difference in length (M12 FUEL is a tad longer), and the power advantage of the M18 compact, and I take the M18 for most scenarios.

 

Still, there's no doubting the M12 FUEL Drill kicks some serious ass.

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If my first video I did on testing my 2604 proved anything, is that it kicks serious ass on smaller drills. Not many smaller drills can do what the 2604 can do, and thats a fact.

 

certainly not, but that's a different class. more weight, more size, more power.

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