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wayneburgess

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My brother visited the UK on a school trip. He really enjoyed himself. I was pissed when I found out there is such a thing as Johnny Walker Yellow and he didn't bring me back a bottle. I seldom drink, but when the occasion arises there's nothing better than JW Blue label. Unfortunately $250 a bottle is a bit pricey so I usually settle for Black label. He did bring me some packets of Brown sauce though. Never knew there was such a thing.

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The Yellow label was a 100th anniversary run but I think it was just regular black label whiskey in the bottle.

Its expensive blended whisky, and now owned and brewed miles away from where it was originally made ( It got bought by the big boys).

I have tried a few but a good single malt whisky gets my vote :)

I think it may be still true that if the label is spelt whisky its brewed in Scotland and if it's spelt with an e in there it is not.

Just don't let a Scotsman catch you adding anything to a single malt.lol

Brown sauce is a must on a grafter's breakfast. ( a grafter is a hard working bloke)

Round here that's 3 bacon, 2 sausages, 2 eggs, tinned or fresh grilled tomatoes,fried bread,baked beans, fried mushrooms, black pudding, and a large pile of toasted bread loaded with butter and then brown sauce.

Nice with a big pot of tea. :D

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We drink tea only in the summer, only if it's ice cold, and only if it's really sweet. That's the southern way anyhow. Not sure how the Yankees do it.

Being born and raised in New England, I can tell you they take their hot tea far more seriously than they take sweat tea in the south. They have places called tea rooms where you can get many types of tea and they look at you funny if you mention ice. They also take coffee seriously as well, and have some coffee houses that make Starbucks, look like a fast food restaurant along the lines of Burger King.

In general, they take food a lot more seriously then they do in the south, with the exception of barbeque, and sweat tea .

Compare traditional foods like chicken fried steak to a New York strip, Maine lobster to blackened redfish, crab cakes vs salmon patties, not much I can compare to conch fritters, but I am thinking that is more of a Bahamian thing anyhow. I can't even think of a traditional southern soup outside of Cajun gumbo or black eyed pea or bean soup verse Manhattan or New England clam chowder, lobster bisque. New England clam bake to a low country boil, Heck I have an almost impossible time trying to find a good pizza or even a descent hot dog here in Florida. I have to add Boston baked beans, Coney Island hot dogs, Philly cheese steaks, New York and Chicago pizza. And where else but the South could you find such delicacies as fried baloney, cracklings, and scrapple. I will concede to the south on Virginia ham, and you won't go home hungry from a proper southern breakfast of eggs, bacon, sausage, fried potatoes, with biscuits covered in white sausage gravy, and a strong cup of hot coffee, although a northern steak and eggs breakfast is nothing to sneeze at.

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Here in West Virginia we get a bit of both. As I'm sure you're aware we separated from Virginia during the Civil War because at the time the bulk of the population in what is now WV was in the northern part of the State where there was a strong northern sympathy. From day 1 we've been the red headed stepchild of states. We're below the Mason - Dixon line which leads us to be considered a southern state by the academic community and the northern states, while the details of our founding sometimes leads us to be regarded as a northern state by the southerners. The truth is really kind of in between. During the Civil war my hometown featured a union officers academy on one side of the street and a confederate recruiting station on the other and almost everyone has relatives who fought on both sides. It was truly a brother versus brother war in WV. The northern part of the state has a very northern feel about it while the southern part of the state has an undeniably southern personality. Even the weather straddles the fence. We have long hot summers and long cold winters. You might find hot tea and crumpets in Wheeling, but Charleston is a sweet tea and peach cobbler kinda place. The majority of us consider ourselves southerners.

Wayne: In the south biscuits are heavy and made with buttermilk, NEVER sweet! Rolls are sweet, biscuits are buttery. Cornbread is kinda the in between.

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Being born and raised in New England, I can tell you they take their hot tea far more seriously than they take sweat tea in the south. They have places called tea rooms where you can get many types of tea and they look at you funny if you mention ice. They also take coffee seriously as well, and have some coffee houses that make Starbucks, look like a fast food restaurant along the lines of Burger King.

In general, they take food a lot more seriously then they do in the south, with the exception of barbeque, and sweat tea .

Compare traditional foods like chicken fried steak to a New York strip, Maine lobster to blackened redfish, crab cakes vs salmon patties, not much I can compare to conch fritters, but I am thinking that is more of a Bahamian thing anyhow. I can't even think of a traditional southern soup outside of Cajun gumbo or black eyed pea or bean soup verse Manhattan or New England clam chowder, lobster bisque. New England clam bake to a low country boil, Heck I have an almost impossible time trying to find a good pizza or even a descent hot dog here in Florida. I have to add Boston baked beans, Coney Island hot dogs, Philly cheese steaks, New York and Chicago pizza. And where else but the South could you find such delicacies as fried baloney, cracklings, and scrapple. I will concede to the south on Virginia ham, and you won't go home hungry from a proper southern breakfast of eggs, bacon, sausage, fried potatoes, with biscuits covered in white sausage gravy, and a strong cup of hot coffee, although a northern steak and eggs breakfast is nothing to sneeze at.

That's it I am going to eat. Now what should I start with.

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Here in West Virginia we get a bit of both. As I'm sure you're aware we separated from Virginia during the Civil War because at the time the bulk of the population in what is now WV was in the northern part of the State where there was a strong northern sympathy. From day 1 we've been the red headed stepchild of states. We're below the Mason - Dixon line which leads us to be considered a southern state by the academic community and the northern states, while the details of our founding sometimes leads us to be regarded as a northern state by the southerners. The truth is really kind of in between. During the Civil war my hometown featured a union officers academy on one side of the street and a confederate recruiting station on the other and almost everyone has relatives who fought on both sides. It was truly a brother versus brother war in WV. The northern part of the state has a very northern feel about it while the southern part of the state has an undeniably southern personality. Even the weather straddles the fence. We have long hot summers and long cold winters. You might find hot tea and crumpets in Wheeling, but Charleston is a sweet tea and peach cobbler kinda place. The majority of us consider ourselves southerners.

Wayne: In the south biscuits are heavy and made with buttermilk, NEVER sweet! Rolls are sweet, biscuits are buttery. Cornbread is kinda the in between.

I love history, even though I don't know anything. Thanks for that info. That was truly brother against brother.

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We drink tea only in the summer, only if it's ice cold, and only if it's really sweet. That's the southern way anyhow. Not sure how the Yankees do it.

Even though I live in Illinois, the Bankrupt state ( I think we might be changing our license plates to that motto soon), I associate myself more with the south in terms of values etc. However, I can't stand sweet tea. I drink tea all the time, but unsweetened tea. Not a huge fan of hot tea except in the winter when I am sick and have a man cold

Nothing like a cold glass of tea in the summer. Besides water, tea is the only thing that really quenches my thirst. Well, Ok beer does also. Someone told me that sweet tea in the south is so much different then sweet tea in the north, so next time I am in the south, I am going to give it a try.

Wayne, what about you. Isn't tea big by you also?

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My wife and I went to New York City last summer for a work related conference. Everyone we knew that had been there suggested we check out the street vendors for lunch. So, we were sight seeing one day and stumbled upon one of the 5,000 Halal food vendors about the time my stomach started growling. I've done a good bit of traveling but being from an area where many high schools have like 1 or 2 black kids, 1 mexican kid every 4 or 5 years, and never a muslim kid EVER, it isn't exactly the most cultured place to live. It's a beautiful place, the cost of living is low, and I could go on vacation, leave my door unlocked, and my neighbor would probably mow my lawn while I was gone, but culturally diverse it is not. We had not the slightest of clues what Halal food was. We saw a bunch of them and we just figured it was some big street vending chain or something. So my buddy from Virginia and I went to the Halal cart and our wives went to the one called King Tut which was right beside it. I ordered chicken and rice and it was spicy and very good. My wife ordered a Philly cheesesteak and we sat down at Rockefeller center to eat. As we started eating I noticed that the King Tut cart said something about Halal food and I realized Halal wasn't a brand name. About that time my wife started spitting and hacking, and said, there's something not right with this sandwich! What's wrong with it I asked? I don't know, it's like the beef is out of date or something, it's just awful. She walks back up to the cart and tells the guy the beef is out of date. He looks at her and says "beef?" she stood silent for a moment and asked "this isn't beef?" "No, no, no, lamb" My wife turned white as a ghost. After a quick google search on my iPhone I discovered Halal is the islamic equivalent of Kosher. Had I have known that we'd have probably just went to Mcdonald's. At least their Kangaroo patties taste similar to beef.

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