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Home made table saw


howard

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Hi Howard,

I would think the saw should cut exactly the same timber as it did before.

Just be careful though pal I have seen some very dangerous looking efforts on the Internet with switches taped in the on position and all kinds of crazy stuff.

I would always recommend buying one that is made for the job.They are rated properly and the switch on a factory built is in a safe position.They also have the guards to prevent injury.

If it is a cost issue take a look at some of the great used tools out there. :)

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It would depend a lot on what your cutting. 300mm seems like a lot of blade for a small circular saw motor to be spinning. If your just using it for light cutting in soft wood you may not have any problems, If your taking deep cuts in hard woods I can't see that saw lasting very long, especially if your going to do any production type work.

I'm wondering what your motivation for doing this is. I have seen far more scary unsafe set ups of this type than well made rigs. Table saws are one of the easier tools to get a serious injury from, and could be made even more dangerous with some poor design thrown into the mix.

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Thanks for that Wayne - I will be taking safety seriously as I require all my digits for other tasks :) I need a bespoke table because my work space is pretty compact also I quite enjoy making my own stuff. Thanks again

Hate it when OP replies, before I finish my reply, answering what I'm wondering about. LOL

You could build a jobsite tablesaw into a workbench. This is a pretty common space saving concept that I have seen done;

Most of the people that I know, that are really short on space. have switched over to using track saws.

One Idea that I liked that was thinking outside the box was Dino Makropoulos upsidedown rig

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JBr_q9KT7E

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Personally I would just buy a table saw, but if you insist on making one then I would have to believe that the motors of a table saw, miter saw, and circular saw would be pretty much the same. They would all be 15 Amp motors and spin the blade at around the same RPM range. When you compare the physical motor size of a circular saw and a miter saw they're pretty much the same.

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After a bit of research I can tell you this. The Milwaukee 6390 7 1/4" and the 6470 10 1/4" circular saws both use the same 15 Amp motor which Milwaukee rates at 3.0 HP. The Milwaukee 6950 12" Compound miter uses a 15 Amp 3.3 HP motor. So, the circular saw motor should be sufficient for a 10" blade, but may be a tad under powered for a 12" blade if you base it on what the manufactures use to power them.

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After a bit of research I can tell you this. The Milwaukee 6390 7 1/4" and the 6470 10 1/4" circular saws both use the same 15 Amp motor which Milwaukee rates at 3.0 HP. The Milwaukee 6950 12" Compound miter uses a 15 Amp 3.3 HP motor. So, the circular saw motor should be sufficient for a 10" blade, but may be a tad under powered for a 12" blade if you base it on what the manufactures use to power them.

1200 watts is about a 10 Amps

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