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Safety Boots


silbchris

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Depends on what the extra protection is for.

Safety toes are in case you drop something big on your foot, nothing more. But they protect the ties, not metatarsals. Metatarsal boots extend this all the way back to your ankle albeit not all that comfortably until recently. Today thanks to a Brit some of them come with D3O which is this awesome foam that makes it just a fat tongue in the boot. Very popular with welders not just for the protection but if a piece of molten slag lands on the boot it just rolls off instead of burning through.

As far as the various types, carbon fiber is the lightest, composite light and not thermally conductive (think winter), and steel the heaviest with prices following the obvious trend.

Another thing to consider is shanks. The shank is a short plate in the sole. Most boots have a short one because it helps keep the shoe from rolling as you walk. Lineman and ditch digger (shovel) boots have 3/4 or full shank. This is a little less comfortable because the boot is much stiffer and doesn’t bend at the toes and arch. The advantage is that you can stand on a ladder rung or throw your full weight onto a shovel without bruising your feet. So if you will be digging footers a longer shank is a huge plus.

Finally there are puncture resistant inserts and boots. I strongly recommend the latter. The inserts take up about a half size so you can’t reuse existing boots and they are basically a piece of steel with some foam on top that feels like standing on thin foam covering a steel plate (ow!)

As a side note there is “EH” that is a thin membrane that is supposed to protect from shock. It is not tested and does NOT work. Please don’t ask how I know about the latter. Let’s just say I and others have tested it.

As far as what you need, the most common residential construction accident next to getting stuff in your eyes has to be nails through the foot. Rarely getting things dropped on your foot. As a mostly industrial maintenance person after about 30 years of experience I’d say I’ve put nails through my foot 4 or 5 times, dropped something on my foot where the steel toe worked maybe 2-3 times, and hit my metatarsals at least twice. Unless you religiously pound out the nails every time and pick every nail and screw up every time it will happen eventually.

The best thing about steel toes is you can kick the blank out of something when you need to. Or balance something heavy on your foot comfortably. Like when a horse plays “lean” with you or steps on your foot to show dominance. In bare feet (been there done that) it is very painful and bruises for a week. In steel toes you can laugh at the horse attempting it as their foot rolls off yours!

All that being said what I’m trying to say is for a kitchen remodel probably not safety toes. If anything puncture resistant soles would be my first thought if I did it professionally. Regardless you need to try them on in a store. They all fit very differently from a standard shoe/boot. Safety toes in particular have a tendency to cut into the sides or top of your foot so you often need a larger toe box or the right width or go up a size from what you are used to. Also consider riggers. So comfortable. There is a reason they’re popular.


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Different protective cushions - with composite or iron underfoot and high-strength shields - are included in special footwear. Armor with a metal sock and insole is heavier and less pleasant to wear, but it is more reliable in terms of puncture and impact resistance. Shoe protection comes in a variety of forms, including impact, cuts, vibrations, cold, and water. However, these shoes are quite uncomfortable to walk in and cause foot fatigue. Following them, I enjoy wearing my new Yeezys. Because they're as light as a feather and as dependable as even the toughest footwear. I would always wear yeezys if it weren't for my job, lol.a

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  • 6 months later...
On 9/25/2019 at 7:03 PM, paulengr said:

Depends on what the extra protection is for.

Safety toes are in case you drop something big on your foot, nothing more. But they protect the ties, not metatarsals. Metatarsal boots extend this all the way back to your ankle albeit not all that comfortably until recently. Today thanks to a Brit some of them come with D3O which is this awesome foam that makes it just a fat tongue in the boot. Very popular with welders not just for the protection but if a piece of molten slag lands on the boot it just rolls off instead of burning through.

As far as the various types, carbon fiber is the lightest, composite light and not thermally conductive (think winter), and steel the heaviest with prices following the obvious trend.

Another thing to consider is shanks. The shank is a short plate in the sole. Most boots have a short one because it helps keep the shoe from rolling as you walk. Lineman and ditch digger (shovel) boots have 3/4 or full shank. This is a little less comfortable because the boot is much stiffer and doesn’t bend at the toes and arch. The advantage is that you can stand on a ladder rung or throw your full weight onto a shovel without bruising your feet. So if you will be digging footers a longer shank is a huge plus.

Finally there are puncture resistant inserts and boots. I strongly recommend the latter. The inserts take up about a half size so you can’t reuse existing boots and they are basically a piece of steel with some foam on top that feels like standing on thin foam covering a steel plate (ow!)

As a side note there is “EH” that is a thin membrane that is supposed to protect from shock. It is not tested and does NOT work. Please don’t ask how I know about the latter. Let’s just say I and others have tested it.

As far as what you need, the most common residential construction accident next to getting stuff in your eyes has to be nails through the foot. Rarely getting things dropped on your foot. As a mostly industrial maintenance person after about 30 years of experience I’d say I’ve put nails through my foot 4 or 5 times, dropped something on my foot where the steel toe worked maybe 2-3 times, and hit my metatarsals at least twice. Unless you religiously pound out the nails every time and pick every nail and screw up every time it will happen eventually.

The best thing about steel toes is you can kick the blank out of something when you need to. Or balance something heavy on your foot comfortably. Like when a horse plays “lean” with you or steps on your foot to show dominance. In bare feet (been there done that) it is very painful and bruises for a week. In steel toes you can laugh at the horse attempting it as their foot rolls off yours!

All that being said what I’m trying to say is for a kitchen remodel probably not safety toes. If anything puncture resistant soles would be my first thought if I did it professionally. Regardless you need to try them on in a store. They all fit very differently from a standard shoe/boot. Safety toes in particular have a tendency to cut into the sides or top of your foot so you often need a larger toe box or the right width or go up a size from what you are used to. Also consider riggers. So comfortable. There is a reason they’re popular.

dr martens boots by spyboots
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Hi, after just being diagnosed with plantar fasciitis (painful feet) stabbing feeling in heel when I walk! Was wondering if anyone else out there has a similar problem and if so what safety footwear they would recommend? Preferably something with arch support! Cheers Mal

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On 10/8/2022 at 12:48 AM, okpermanent said:

Hi, after just being diagnosed with plantar fasciitis (painful feet) stabbing feeling in heel when I walk! Was wondering if anyone else out there has a similar problem and if so what safety footwear they would recommend? Preferably something with arch support! Cheers Mal

Have a look at Blaklader catalogue. Blaklader is a Swedish brand specialised in workwear and boots, if you are not able to find their PDF catalogue let me know and I will find it for you. 

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On 9/25/2019 at 9:03 AM, paulengr said:

 

At work I need to wear safety boots,  all properly rated to recognised standard. Years of cheap ones made for people with exceptionally wide feet made me shop around. I saw a company called Grisport made a really widely used safety boot (coca cola in Europe and car manufacturers) that was getting good reviews. Plus Grisport is an Italian hiking boot manufacturer I first heard of for hiking boots. I got them,  own money because work only buy £25 boots the tight wads! Initially they felt great but over the last 6+ months I've been getting worse sore instep under the foot and an increasingly painful outer toes on left foot. Length and width feels good but this pain is like when you first stub your bare foot hard! Since the boot has plenty of room I thought it was my out of work time outdoor trainers, salomon x ultra 3, third pair of x ultra. I bought new shoes with a roomier toe area. However since I took a few days off a month or so ago during which my painful toes got better I now know it's my worm boots. Are they salvageable? If not anybody know a good safety boot that's as conformable and hiking boot like as possible? My foot size/shape is narrow heel, average instep width and high arches.

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On 12/5/2023 at 4:08 AM, sawihel said:

At work I need to wear safety boots,  all properly rated to recognised standard. Years of cheap ones made for people with exceptionally wide feet made me shop around. I saw a company called Grisport made a really widely used safety boot (coca cola in Europe and car manufacturers) that was getting good reviews. Plus Grisport is an Italian hiking boot manufacturer I first heard of for hiking boots. I got them,  own money because work only buy £25 boots the tight wads! Initially they felt great but over the last 6+ months I've been getting worse sore instep under the foot and an increasingly painful outer toes on left foot. Length and width feels good but this pain is like when you first stub your bare foot hard! Since the boot has plenty of room I thought it was my out of work time outdoor trainers, salomon x ultra 3, third pair of x ultra. I bought new shoes with a roomier toe area. However since I took a few days off a month or so ago during which my painful toes got better I now know it's my worm boots. Are they salvageable? If not anybody know a good safety boot that's as conformable and hiking boot like as possible? My foot size/shape is narrow heel, average instep width and high arches.

I have been using Keen the past few years. Comfortable day one if you get the right size. They are well over the £25 price you mentioned. I usually pay over $100 usd for my saftey shoes that I use for the warm months and around $200 usd for the safety boots I wear for cold months. Keen has all sorts of options with a wide range of feature sets. You should be able to find one that will fit your needs.

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