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This design could be adapted by major brands.


Altan

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@Altan I have seen this. It is an interesting idea. I am trying to figure out where its place is though. While there is nothing exactly like it, the increasingly large amount of removable chuck drills, might serve a similar function this drill is trying to accomplish. I'm not sure how useful it is for my workflow especially with the added bulk of the switchdriver function. Have you used this drill? Is it is useful enough over a removable chuck drill to make the switchdriver function worth it?

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2 hours ago, Jronman said:

@Altan I have seen this. It is an interesting idea. I am trying to figure out where its place is though. While there is nothing exactly like it, the increasingly large amount of removable chuck drills, might serve a similar function this drill is trying to accomplish. I'm not sure how useful it is for my workflow especially with the added bulk of the switchdriver function. Have you used this drill? Is it is useful enough over a removable chuck drill to make the switchdriver function worth it?

This tool is sold on eBay UK for around 80 GBP, removable chuck drills are also good, but when you want to predrill in wood and then screw you will have to none stop change the bits any way, this one would be much better as you just need to turn it. 

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2 hours ago, Jronman said:

@Altan I have seen this. It is an interesting idea. I am trying to figure out where its place is though. While there is nothing exactly like it, the increasingly large amount of removable chuck drills, might serve a similar function this drill is trying to accomplish. I'm not sure how useful it is for my workflow especially with the added bulk of the switchdriver function. Have you used this drill? Is it is useful enough over a removable chuck drill to make the switchdriver function worth it?

I don't buy tools from these brands, if it was DeWALT, Makita, Festool, CAS then I would buy. 

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Worx is one of those brands that make both practical and gimmicky tools.  For an idea of how much so, check out ToolGuyd's posts about them.

 

Even if made by a better known brand, I'd probably pass on something like this.  Then again, I have so many drills that my plan is to simply chuck up as many as needed before starting a project, and will probably designate certain drills for my most used bit sizes.  12v Max and M12 will get the smaller stuff, while the Octane, M18 Fuel, and DCD996 hammer drills will get the bigger bits and hole saws.

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1 hour ago, fm2176 said:

Worx is one of those brands that make both practical and gimmicky tools.  For an idea of how much so, check out ToolGuyd's posts about them.

 

Even if made by a better known brand, I'd probably pass on something like this.  Then again, I have so many drills that my plan is to simply chuck up as many as needed before starting a project, and will probably designate certain drills for my most used bit sizes.  12v Max and M12 will get the smaller stuff, while the Octane, M18 Fuel, and DCD996 hammer drills will get the bigger bits and hole saws.

I am not so happy with the quality of their tools, I have seen a lot of their tools. What I aim to have is a single battery platform of tools with the quality of Festool, Mafell and Rems. I don't want to see lower (Worx, Ryobi, Ridgid) or even medium (some DeWALT, Makita, Bosch and Milwaukee tools) quality tools around me. I don't want to feel I live in 2022, I want to feel I live in 1970-90 when we had quality mostly Western made tools. 

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On 4/18/2022 at 4:55 PM, Altan said:

I am not so happy with the quality of their tools, I have seen a lot of their tools. What I aim to have is a single battery platform of tools with the quality of Festool, Mafell and Rems. I don't want to see lower (Worx, Ryobi, Ridgid) or even medium (some DeWALT, Makita, Bosch and Milwaukee tools) quality tools around me. I don't want to feel I live in 2022, I want to feel I live in 1970-90 when we had quality mostly Western made tools. 

 

Given the increasingly global based economy and the tendency for consumers to buy stuff that provides the most "value", I don't see these less expensive or niche brands losing ground to a European tool confederacy, at least here in North America.  

 

Like most other things these days, cordless tools (with very few exceptions) are designed and manufactured to be disposable.  The quality tools we used to have were relatively easy to repair and maintain; brushes and cords were usually the main culprit if a tool went down.

 

A lot of us can get by with a brand like Ryobi, or even Work.  My Milwaukee and DeWalt tools see the most use at the flipper house, while the Ryobi batteries are always in use around my home.  

 

Given the two major conglomerates over here (SBD and TTI), I'd like to see them release cross-platform adapters or a common battery, but they won't.  TTI, for example, wouldn't want Milwaukee owners to have the option of using much cheaper Ryobi batteries.

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6 minutes ago, fm2176 said:

 

Given the increasingly global based economy and the tendency for consumers to buy stuff that provides the most "value", I don't see these less expensive or niche brands losing ground to a European tool confederacy, at least here in North America.  

 

Like most other things these days, cordless tools (with very few exceptions) are designed and manufactured to be disposable.  The quality tools we used to have were relatively easy to repair and maintain; brushes and cords were usually the main culprit if a tool went down.

 

A lot of us can get by with a brand like Ryobi, or even Work.  My Milwaukee and DeWalt tools see the most use at the flipper house, while the Ryobi batteries are always in use around my home.  

 

Given the two major conglomerates over here (SBD and TTI), I'd like to see them release cross-platform adapters or a common battery, but they won't.  TTI, for example, wouldn't want Milwaukee owners to have the option of using much cheaper Ryobi batteries.

You are right, but I will continue fighting against this mentality which wants cheap things, when I was a child not everybody could afford to buy a car (in my country) but now poor can also buy a car, why? Because the market is flooded with cheap cars, and the poor wants to have a car, why? Because there is something in subconscious that if they buy a car they are not poor anymore. The manufacturers (car, tool and other sectors) are aware of this and they are abusing this, and they make this world full of not recycled rubbish. 

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19 minutes ago, Altan said:

You are right, but I will continue fighting against this mentality which wants cheap things, when I was a child not everybody could afford to buy a car (in my country) but now poor can also buy a car, why? Because the market is flooded with cheap cars, and the poor wants to have a car, why? Because there is something in subconscious that if they buy a car they are not poor anymore. The manufacturers (car, tool and other sectors) are aware of this and they are abusing this, and they make this world full of not recycled rubbish. 

 

I definitely agree, and have witnessed first hand the mentality of many lower income families.  I have a number of examples, but as a Recruiter I once visited a family who had a nice Cadillac in the driveway and a big screen TV inside, though they lived in a run down house in a particularly bad part of town.

 

The service centers of yore are mostly gone now.  Back in the '90s my boss would take his UniVolt and other B&D tools to the local one for repairs or maintenance.  Nowadays we simply throw the thing away and go to the local big box for a new one.  As an aside, a friend retrieved a DeWalt DCF887 brushless impact from a dumpster at the house next to his (currently being renovated).  It works fine, so I think one of the workers probably had a minor issue with it, or perhaps overload protection kicked in), and tossed it instead of trying to figure out the issue.

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7 minutes ago, fm2176 said:

 

I definitely agree, and have witnessed first hand the mentality of many lower income families.  I have a number of examples, but as a Recruiter I once visited a family who had a nice Cadillac in the driveway and a big screen TV inside, though they lived in a run down house in a particularly bad part of town.

 

The service centers of yore are mostly gone now.  Back in the '90s my boss would take his UniVolt and other B&D tools to the local one for repairs or maintenance.  Nowadays we simply throw the thing away and go to the local big box for a new one.  As an aside, a friend retrieved a DeWalt DCF887 brushless impact from a dumpster at the house next to his (currently being renovated).  It works fine, so I think one of the workers probably had a minor issue with it, or perhaps overload protection kicked in), and tossed it instead of trying to figure out the issue.

It has a few reasons, back in the 90's probably you had to work 7 days to get a DeWALT drill but now probably 1 day only, because most of the tools are produced in China and the cost is low so we get the tools cheaper these days. Another reason is people were more in repairing the tools as tools were more expensive those days, and they had to learn how to repair basic things themselves. Another reason is that we had more metal parts in tools those days but now we have replaced it with plastic. 

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1 hour ago, fyrfytr998 said:

This is generations of planned obsolescence having been ingrained into our brains. Much more convenient to buy something new than repair it.

That is also true!

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14 hours ago, fyrfytr998 said:

This is generations of planned obsolescence having been ingrained into our brains. Much more convenient to buy something new than repair it.

 

I have a wood tube radio in the garage.  Back when it was made (1940s?) people would repair them if a tube blew it there was another issue.  Of course, Radio Shack was successful because it was a one stop shop for electronics repair parts, before it became a glorified phone store and eventually went defunct.  I would go there for record player needles in the '90s.

 

Modern junk is just that: junk.  That nice new iPhone 13 Pro will be yesterday's news next year, obsolete within a few years, and in the dump before the end of the decade.  That's if you don't break it or lose it within a few months.  Sure, there's an entire market for cell phone repair, but at the end of the day, who doesn't want to have the latest and greatest?

 

I see the same thing with friends and family.  They might have a perfectly good 55" TV, but if they get a little money, they'll go buy an 80" curved screen TV.  

 

Tools are a bit different, but power tools made today don't see to be designed to last for a lifetime of use.  I think that the mentality started changing around when plastic became the material of choice for nearly everything.  

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