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Biggie

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Everything posted by Biggie

  1. We currently have a m18 fuel 1" 2712 , a dewalt 1" dch133, and over the years we've had multiple corded 1" sds rotary hammers as well. For most of our work this size suits us very well as most of our concrete anchors are 3/8"-5/8" but more recently we've gotten into some bigger jobs that require 3/4" and 7/8" holes. The 1" drills can drill these larger holes but its pretty hard on them because we're drilling 30-50 holes 10" deep one after another. This isn't an everyday task as we typically set these larger anchors in wet concrete but a few times a year we get stuck drilling. So I'm looking to add a larger rotary hammer for these jobs and my question is will a 1 1/8" drill be enough of a bump in performance or do I need to be looking at a sds max 1 9/16". From the online reviews I've seen from places like OZ Tool Talk it looks like the bigger sds max drills don't really shine until you get up into holes over 1". I think I want to go cordless as we have a pretty good collection of batteries and while I do like my milwaukee tools and the 2712, it does seem that in most of the comparison videos I've seen the dewalt rotary hammers are the better of the two. Does anyone have any real world experience drilling 3/4"-7/8" holes and what size drill are you using? I'm really thinking a m18 fuel 1 1/8" 2715 or the dewalt 20v 1 1/8" dch293 is what I want to go with and I think the dewalt might be a better drill but the dewalt is $400 and the m18 $300 right now.
  2. Did the same thing with my 20v max chain saw.
  3. Got a couple little toys... I mean tools for Christmas.
  4. The one feature of the mid range impact that I disagree with is on both high and low settings reverse is still max speed and torque. They already have the auto mode designed for taking off lug bolts/nuts. I just don't know why when they can conceive the situation where I might not want to have full power in forward, why can't conceive the same scenario in reverse. I know there is still a variable speed trigger but the same could be said about any situation so then why even have speeds. Its just not true to say well any time I'm in reverse I want to have full torque and that is their engineers approach to it. There are plenty of situations where I'm removing a delicate bolt that the last thing I want to do is snap it off.
  5. It's really hard to say who should or shouldn't buy brushless because everyone uses tools differently. At work I love the runtime we get with brushless tools but doing small projects around the house brushed tools are more than adequate for me. That being said we ran the brushed recip. saws on our construction sites for years and while they can be battery hungry in certain situations, I would think a couple 4.0ah or 5.0ah batteries would keep you pretty satisfied. I'm no expert when it comes to circular saws but I know there was a topic not to far back that was discussing the dcs570 and there were a number of guys who said for a 20v saw they prefer the brushed dcs393 with a 6.0ah battery over the brushless dcs570. I guess what I'm trying to get at is brushless isn't neccesary for everyone.
  6. The hammer drill and impact are brushless but the recip. and circ. saws are not.
  7. The dcd996 hammer drill and dcd991 drill should be exactly the same except the hammer function. They have the same power, speeds, and chucks. I do know that milwaukee doesnt put the same chuck on their non hammer drill as their hammer drill, the hammer drill has carbide inserts in the chuck and the non doesn't. But the dewalt dcd996 and dcd991 both have the carbide insert chuck. I couldn't tell you what the dewalt compact drills (dcd796 and dcd791)have for chucks.
  8. Biggie

    refurbishing dcf886

    Intermittent electical issues with these brushless tools can be annoying. I've had some tools that will act up once for no apparent reason and never do it again. But usually when they're well used once they start having intermittent issues they keep happening more often until they become pretty much unusable. The one good thing about diagnosing brushless tools is that because all of the components are soldered and podded you can only buy a motor and switch assembly. The assembly is one part that replaces the trigger, motor, and all the wiring. The only problem is they usually cost in the neighborhood of $60-90 if you can find one on ebay and on ereplacement parts right now it's $117. Which if the impact is already well used I would think you would be far better off starting off with a new impact. New dcf887 are available on ebay for $80 or if you want a new in box there are a lot of holiday deals right now.
  9. I had a dcd995 that would slip and grind in 3rd gear once put under a load. It was acting like it was clutching out but it worked just fine in 2nd and 1st gear. So I took it apart to find that the gear and shifter were wore enough that they were acting like ramps. I replaced the gear assembly and shifter assembly and it's solved the problem. The drill is 5 years old and it was a fairly inexpensive fix. I was actually impressed it was the first time the tool had been opened up. It's kind of hard to see in the pictures but the wear is on the inside teeth on the shifter ring and the outer teeth on the top ring of the gear assembly.
  10. In theory it sounds like a good idea to have a corded adapter and I can see using it for stationary tools ex: table/miter saw. But on a grinder I just can't see myself ever using this adapter. Even in our shop where we have outlets every 6' and multiple extension cord reels, 90% of the time I'm using a cordless grinder. The other 10% where I have to use a corded grinder I would rather use a dedicated corded that has better ergonomics.
  11. I got mine today, and being in America I'm a little annoyed that they use metric wenches for the collet. The tool will be on a truck that doesn't have metric tools and I'm sure it wont take long to lose those cheapo wrenches they send with it, which will lead to using cresent wrenches and vise grips which will lead to striping. I know it wont happen overnight or that its dewalts fault it'll be abused but its just the reality of the job site.
  12. In this video it looks like he got a backing flange and a nut for the front. How does the milwaukee compare to your metabo and dewalt? I've been looking for an excuse to buy one but I don't really need one and they're just expensive enough to resist the urge.
  13. Don't quote me on this because I have zero experience but I thought the 1860's had some short comings and they found in some situations they weren't much better than the 5.0s. It just seemed like when milwaukee announced the 9.0's they said the 1860 was going to be released too but then they didn't release at the same time and I thought the word was that they were having some issues. Now I know they're out there but they were never really announced as being out or as being the next big thing.
  14. For the price of the dch133 it's probably the best value for a 1" sds rotary hammer. In the US its around $200 when all other 1" sds hammers including the dch273 are around $300. We have a dch133 and a m18 fuel 1" sds and performance wise they are very close. The only thing the dch133 is missing is vibration control which depending on how much you're using it may or may not be important to you.
  15. My company has both milwaukee and dewalt. For what we do I personally prefer milwaukee as I like some of their metal working tools better. That being said, we have other trucks with matching dewalt tools and they do the job just fine. I think dewalt probably has a slight edge when it comes to wood working though. As far as quality/durability goes they can both be broken but I like milwaukees 5 year warranty better than dewalts 1. For the trade up deal in the US you can trade in any 18v broken tool so I would have a hard time trading in a perfectly good tool.
  16. My local farm and fleet store had $150 off plus a free 5.0 battery. So I got the premium drill and Impact and 3 5.0 batteries for $250. Its the best black Friday deal I've seen if you happened to be in the market for it.
  17. I was also looking at picking up the dewalt. I see you're from Australia so I'm sure prices are completely different but right now at CPO you can get one for $119 no tax and free shipping in the States and when they first came out they were around $180. I currently have the m18 die grinder which I don't use all that often but I have no complaints about it. I would say its more powerful than the little air die grinder we have but I have no experience with a corded model. I'm just getting a dewalt for a truck we have that has all dewalt but all the reviews I've seen were positive other than the trigger not being able to lock on. So you always have to have a finger on the trigger but some of that is a preference thing.
  18. These must be popular sellers, I see they've raised the prices from $159 to $179 bare tool and $249 to $269 for the kits.
  19. Yea I think the electric gun they were comparing it to at nsp was a hitachi which has 740ft/lbs of torque which I believe is around that 1000nm. I don't know if Milwaukee is really lying about torque numbers as its been shown many times on skidmores that the 1/2" guns will in fact reach those torques. But yes it doesn't seem to make sense that 1" is rated the same or less. The 1" must be under rated or maybe has more to do with the force they hit with and the time it's takes to achieve the torque.
  20. Like the title says, has anyone heard anything more about the new m18 1" impact. Is it still going to be released before the end of the year? What kind of torque numbers and price point will it have? I thought maybe there would be some more info about it at stafda but I never saw anything from any of the tool reviewers.
  21. Biggie

    6.0 xr build quality

    It's not an issue with the battery falling off tools. I've had around 30 different 20v max batteries and while they maybe aren't all perfect, it's really just 3 of the 5 6.0xr batteries that I've really noticed the button just feels crappy. I think they all have some side to side play and twist but a firm spring hides a lot of it.
  22. Has anyone else noticed the spring in the battery release button being weak on some 6.0 xr batteries making it seam cheap and flimsy? The first 6.0 I got was about a year ago and it had a weak spring. Then I picked up a couple over the summer and they were better so I thought dewalt had it fixed. Then I picked up a twin pack this weekend and they both have the weak springs. I would say this doesn't seem to be a problem with how the battery stays on the tool, it just gives the battery a cheap feel. The other thing I haven't done is check the actual build dates on the batteries, maybe I just got a older twin pack and dewalt has corrected the issue. I was just curious what other guys are seeing.
  23. While I don't need any encouragement to get the 7"/9" grinder because I need one like I need a hole in my head but it's kind of funny it's the only new HD tool not in the promotion.
  24. Biggie

    Flexvolt

    What are you talking about "old" it says right on it that it's new. It's a SIW 22T-A and it used to be a SIW 18T-A haha. I'm sure it's a fine tool just pretty big in size and weight for the torque it puts out.
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