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Kitchen Half Wall


DamianD

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So I decided to start the half wall project between the kitchen and dining room.  So far so good.  I didn't go as far as tearing it down and rebuilding like I probably should have so it does have a little bit of play but nothing bad. About as good as its going to get for 2x3 studs (don't ask).  I figured the project cost me almost nothing so If it doesn't work out, ill just tear it down and do it over again. Just have the chair rail molding, some drywall work and finishing touches to do.  Right now I'm stuck on the top of the wall.  I have a 1x6 piece of pine I'm using to cap the wall.  I cant decide what shape I should router the edges besides just rounding them over. Maybe a double quarter round?? Any suggestions on a cool shape??

 

 

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I agree with Comp. Also why is the center of the 2x4 apparently nearly an inch lower than the ends? Either you're experiencing settling after removing the old studs or you may need to recut studs to get the top flat. I'd move up the header and double check your cut is flat and level before reattaching the header. I have a cheap little laser level I use to do tasks like this that has never let me down. 

 

This will add a lot of value to your space, it'll be so worth it. 

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I wanted to keep the cap across the bulkhead to plate and trim like the rest of the house is done but decided against the idea mid way. There was a doorway there originally and I replaced what was there, just ran it over the additional 6ish feet.

 

The middle of the 2x3 looks lower because of the cuts in the drywall, its an illusion in the picture.

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Looking at the pics, I'm wondering why leave any wall there at all? It seems like it would interfere with what could be a much better traffic flow through the kitchen into the dining room. Also, with that bulkhead now visible through the two rooms, it would be ideal to eliminate it, but if that's not possible, maybe build out the smaller section to match the larger one so you have a clean line down the ceiling.

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Looking at the pics, I'm wondering why leave any wall there at all? It seems like it would interfere with what could be a much better traffic flow through the kitchen into the dining room. Also, with that bulkhead now visible through the two rooms, it would be ideal to eliminate it, but if that's not possible, maybe build out the smaller section to match the larger one so you have a clean line down the ceiling.

I thought the same thing would make both rooms seem bigger......

@Damian don't get me wrong what your are doing is awesome but some times when you watch someone playing cards you see the play before they do.....

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Want to leave the half wall up because we have the little breakfast table that goes up against it.  It would look awkward to have the table and no wall.  As for the bulk head, it holds the duct work.  Bringing out the smaller one to match the other one sounds like a good idea Ill have to talk it over with the wife.  This was really supposed to be a quick little project lol.  I can always just finish up what I have already and decide from there what way to go with it.

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how would I go about bringing out the smaller bulk head to match the larger one?? That's all duct work behind both so is there framing around them?? Im not sure how to even go about doing that.

that is not what we are suggesting, we are saying to make the top of you half wall higher to match the bulkhead so the bulkhead is flat all around.

and yes there should be framing around it doubt they put drywall right onto sheet metal

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There is no such thing as a small project ;)

 

There is framing around the bulkhead, but you can just leave the old drywall up and frame some new supports for drywall to the ceiling and bottom of the existing bulkhead to pack it out. Get a stud finder, mark out the framing in the bulkhead and ceiling to know your attachment points, and frame 1/2-inch back from the other bulkhead's surface for  your new drywall.

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as I look at this my first question is that a load bearing wall. Do your ceiling joist run from front to back or side to side. what everybody is good. It would have a much cleaner look and also you could put a bar top in with some stools it would give you some more room in  the kitchen.

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The middle of the 2x3 looks lower because of the cuts in the drywall, its an illusion in the picture.

 

I'm not looking at the drywall, I held a sheet of paper as a straight edge and lined up the edge with either end of the 2x, and I see half of the 2x at center exposed below my edge. I'm pretty certain you're roughly an inch low on center. Since I also see same deflection using the same method across your ceiling line, but not the lower cut portion of your wall, something is definitely going on there. Unless you're using a camera with 1/4 of a fish eye lense. 

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as I look at this my first question is that a load bearing wall. Do your ceiling joist run from front to back or side to side. what everybody is good. It would have a much cleaner look and also you could put a bar top in with some stools it would give you some more room in  the kitchen.

 

 

the joists run front to back, so it isnt a load bearing wall. This wall is a very common thing done to the houses in my development.  I thought of doing some sort of wine cooler and small cabinets with a matching coutertop with bar stools under.  Its just too much $$ to put out that I wont see when I sell.  Thats what sucks about townhomes, you could dump 100k into it, its still worth about the same as your neighbor 

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I'm not looking at the drywall, I held a sheet of paper as a straight edge and lined up the edge with either end of the 2x, and I see half of the 2x at center exposed below my edge. I'm pretty certain you're roughly an inch low on center. Since I also see same deflection using the same method across your ceiling line, but not the lower cut portion of your wall, something is definitely going on there. Unless you're using a camera with 1/4 of a fish eye lense. 

 

 

Ill have to double check it then, it was taken with an iphone so idk if thatd have anything to do with it.

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checked it and you are correct.  Tearing it down this week to straighten it out.

 

Any suggestions on the router bit I originally asked about??

 

Glad I could help you catch it before you finished your opening. That would have sucked if a buddy came over for a beer and was like, "...by the way..."

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