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Weight of dcn692


framer

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I think it's relative to the actual motor as opposed to the air system which doesn't need it. I've got the 692 and it is awesome. I've had it a couple of years now and have had a couple of jams but only a couple. Fantastic nailer.

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Really it's the same weight as an air gun....forget the specs...put a hose on a framing gun and it's the same....it holds 1.5 racks of paslode nails vs 2 plus racks on an air gun......that kinda sucks  and paper nails do get wet vs wire nails.....but the gun is bad ass dependable, no lie. ......I'm in business to make money, lots..if there was anything better,faster, more dependable...I'd buy it...I love Dewalt but I love making money more...tools make me money..money let's me help family,friends,neighbors god...

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No kidding all cordless ? We couldn't frame walls fast enough with those paslodes or Dewalt cordless...gotta have max air for many guns running....plus  what do you nail sheathing with ? @framer Because mass code is .131 coil nails..and there are no cordless coolers......I do love the paslode, but the Dewalts are as good or better and definitely cheaper to use......

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After you have fired hundreds of thousands of nails with a paslode cordless, you get really fast with them! 

Here in Illinois where I'm at, inspectors have never questioned what nails I've used.  

Typically use 3x.131 and 3x120 for studs. And 2 3/8 for sheeting. 

 

And why do you have to use coil nails?  They don't allow the full head paslode nails? Or don't they like how the head is offset? 

 

I use to use bostich coil nailers when I first started. Mainly for sheeting since you didn't have to reload frequently. I hated those nailers. Heavy and bulky. Can't really toe nail. 

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Can't use 3" nails for framing in MA..min 3 1/4  by .131 but 3 1/2" by .131 preferred..and sheathing (ply) min .131 by 2 1/4" full head .....paslode 2 3/8" are .113 and smaller heads...inspectors know what you used by head size....also sheets are nailed ..6" on center in the field and 3" on seams...plus two rows of 3" staggered on the bottom and top of sheets....so loading a paslode gun that many times would kill productivity even if they shot a .131 / 2 3/8" nail.....gotta use coil guns.....I like bostich guns...and they are heavy as shit....

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I'm on cape cod.....toughest codes I've heard of.... vertical sheathing only.....inspectors literally measure between nails to pass the house,,..1 spot on 1 wall exceeding the space required could fail inspection,,,holding up further work....we use hold downs(hdu16) on every floor ,floor to floor with vertical rods connecting them.....foundation to roof must be connected by metal not just nails....

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2 hours ago, Framer joe said:

No kidding all cordless ? We couldn't frame walls fast enough with those paslodes or Dewalt cordless...gotta have max air for many guns running....plus  what do you nail sheathing with ? @framer Because mass code is .131 coil nails..and there are no cordless coolers......I do love the paslode, but the Dewalts are as good or better and definitely cheaper to use......

hmm... Maybe someone should create a screwgun that can screw as fast as a nailer can nail and include enough MORE POWA tm to work with framing screws. Would also have collated attachment so you could have strings of screws. 

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3 hours ago, zinzander said:

Do US framing nails have to be round heads? I have never seen a paslode that doesn't shoot 90mm nails which are the standard framing size where I live and is slightly over 3 1/2, but those are D heads

Some areas of the US require full head nails for better pull out resistance. Usually coastal areas

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It is heavy.  I was nailing bracing in trusses the other day.  It's heavy, over your head.  Of course I'm older now, than when I was going after it.  

 

I still choose the DeWalt over an air nailer.  Who knows about the weight.  It may be the same or close, but it feels heavier.  The fact is, I can grab the DeWalt, walk from the truck to the work, and start nailing.  Batteries last more than long enough.  We used one battery for a day and a half.  When it went dead, my son said exactly what I was thinking, "I was just wondering how long that battery was going to last."  Day and a half.  Switched batteries in less than 60 seconds.  Back to work.

 

Now, I'm not knocking Paslode.  I like them.  Sold all of them, but I still like them.  I got tired of the fuel cells running out of propane.  This was mostly due to operator error, but it was something I had to deal with.  I still like the Paslode.  Of course I sold all of them.  Still recommend them, but battery only is better.

 

Heavy.  Feels heavy.  Maybe I'm getting old, but I still have to shoot nails, even when I'm old.  Still lighter than dragging a hose and compressor around.

 

I wouldn't recommend a battery only nailer for production work.  Really needs to be an air nailer.  Will shoot all day without a hiccup.  For remodeling or small framing, battery will work everyday.  Personally I would stop at a garage.  Anything bigger, air nailer.  Personal preference.

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