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I think 36v bandsaw, 36v track saw and 36v 3Ah batteries are looong overdue.


Aprelia

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Seriously Dewalt, no 36v bandsaw? And why the hell is the tracksaw 28v, the dead platform? Now I have to modify the battery shoe, rewind the rotor and fiddle with enabler circuit so it can run on 36v.

I just got my 1/2" impact and while it has good performance it is not great. I see the need for 3/4" drive impact. Milwaukee has a 18v 3/4" that develops 525ft lbs compared to Dewalt in the neighborhood of 350ft lbs. My SDS 36v showed up a couple of days ago and it is amazing. The reverse is about torqueless though, but you cant have everything.

Good idea on the track saw. I saw one go at auction for around $300 in 28v. Adding an extension for the battery shoe shouldnt be that hard. Rewiring the motor probably not necessary. 

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I just got my 1/2" impact and while it has good performance it is not great. I see the need for 3/4" drive impact. Milwaukee has a 18v 3/4" that develops 525ft lbs compared to Dewalt in the neighborhood of 350ft lbs.

my guess is dewalt shared components/design with the 18v version.  i wonder if the electric motor is even being fed 36 volts...i doubt it.

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Milwaukee has a 18v 3/4" that develops 525ft lbs compared to Dewalt in the neighborhood of 350ft lbs. My SDS 36v showed up a couple of days ago and it is amazing. The reverse is about torqueless though, but you cant have everything.

don't believe everything that you read from Milwaukee or Makita.  DeWALT will SUSTAIN over 300 ft/lbs of torque, the Milwaukee PEAKS at the rating they show.  Torque measurements can be very misleading (which is why DeWALT does not rate torque on drills anymore).  Milwaukee has a good impact, don't get me wrong, but from the battery up, it is pretty similar in performance to the DeWALT.  In the battery department, as we discuss on this forum all the time, the Milwaukee is seriously lacking.

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Tracksaw and impact driver would be really nice.

36v radio so people at the other side of town can enjoy the music also ;D

I love my 36v SDS rotary hammer. I hardly use my corded one since I first got it.

I dont think there would be a need for a 36 impact driver...... You can buy an adapter to go from 1/2" to 1/4" hex drive. There is not a screw or bit that would survive. I was driving 12" lag bolts with mine. There was to much give in the bolts so the torque was not transmitted the whole way. I had to finish driving them with a torque wrench.

The tracksaw I would really like to see...... I may give it a go but it could get expensive if I frag a battery or two. I was looking into purchasing another 36v circular saw to cannibalize and a retrofit the motor to the 28v track saw. Will have to see what happens at auction or if I can get a 28v tracksaw powerhead cheap.

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don't believe everything that you read from Milwaukee or Makita.  DeWALT will SUSTAIN over 300 ft/lbs of torque, the Milwaukee PEAKS at the rating they show.  Torque measurements can be very misleading (which is why DeWALT does not rate torque on drills anymore).  Milwaukee has a good impact, don't get me wrong, but from the battery up, it is pretty similar in performance to the DeWALT.  In the battery department, as we discuss on this forum all the time, the Milwaukee is seriously lacking.

I partially agree about torque ratings, Makita lies all the time. HOWEVER! The 28v Milwaukee impact wrench IS more powerful than DC800. I've seen huge (1-1/4" bolt) nuts taken off rusty boiler caps with 3/4" square drive M, and Dewalt DC800 could not keep up. The reason why is M has a beefier hammer-anvil. Tradeoff is lower run-time.

Torque measurements can be misleading if you don't know HOW they were obtained (hard-joint vs soft-joint).

Regarding Milwaukee battery lacking - remember that new Samsungs in 36v are massive shyte despite being iron phosphate, so this is not the case any more. Also new Sanyo cycle life remains to be seen too. Hitachi used Sanyo for ages and I don't see anybody extremely excited about them on the jobsites.

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Seriously Dewalt, no 36v bandsaw? And why the Heck is the tracksaw 28v, the dead platform? Now I have to modify the battery shoe, rewind the rotor and fiddle with enabler circuit so it can run on 36v.

Ok.... I am really wanting a 36v tracksaw and I would like to know if Dewalt is going to introduce one or do I have to start hacking things together.

Question 1.

  I dont have a 28v battery in front of me and dont own one. What is the difference in terminal location, or is there one? They both use the same charger so I am assuming the terminal are orientated the same along with polarity.

Question 2.

The enabler circuit on the 28v tracksaw. Will it burn up with 36 volts? I would think that it would not. Is it encapsulated? Or can the values be determined. If need be a resistor can step down the voltage to 28 and the BMS circuit is what prevents over spec current draw.

Question 3. Motor windings, will they be a problem? A 22% increase in voltage should not really be an issue in this dc configuration.

Question 4. Battery shoe could be an adapter made from a 36v flashlight?

 Question 5. The simplest solution?

Can anyone see if the additional case material could just be removed from the 28v track saw and the 36v battery could just slide in place and be done?

Addition: After much online comparing and measuring the only differences that I can see between making the 36v work on the 28v tracks saw is the key ways in front of the terminals in the yellow plastic on the battery. These would need to be recut on the tracks saw. The battery would extend out the back but could be held in place with a Velcro strap. This is very minor plastic removal and with the variations is cell voltage I assume that none of the circuitry would need to be modified.

Addition #2 I have read that the saw is a soft start tool with dial speed. This may cause some grief and require a separate voltage regulator and possibly a separate fet board. I actually have designed some of these and have some in production.  

Addendum #3 Got off the phone with a tech..... battery can slide in place with very little plastic removal should cause no problems, but could not advise to do so.

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