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DCF899 WOW!!!! Believe the specs


DPSElias

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Well I purchased the DCF899 because I've always wanted a high torque cordless impact was going to buy the M18 just for this but I have the 20v line.

The point, I put it to the test tonight, my 2135ti has been trying hard to remove an over torqued (massively cross threaded) lug from a local tire center with no luck so I figured it would be a good time to buy a DCF899, and with a little effort it removed the damn lug! I am officially impressed!

So if you have the 20v line and you were on the fence this gun is stronger than my beloved 2135ti that I've loved so much and praised it would take anything off, now I have a new king of impacts the only down side is it is bigger and heavier than the 2135ti


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Well I purchased the DCF899 because I've always wanted a high torque cordless impact was going to buy the M18 just for this but I have the 20v line.

The point, I put it to the test tonight, my 2135ti has been trying hard to remove an over torqued lug from a local tire center with no luck so I figured it would be a good time to buy a DCF899, and with a little effort it removed the damn lug! I am officially impressed!

So if you have the 20v line and you were on the fence this gun is stronger than my beloved 2135ti that I've loved so much and praised it would take anything off, now I have a new king of impacts the only down side is it is bigger and heavier than the 2135ti

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. Congrats Don!! I bought into the redline just for the 2763 impact it's amazing how much power they have for being cordless, I'm mostly invested in team yellow and wouldn't mind adding this one to the team but for now my fuel remains King.
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These cordless impacts make serious power these days. That dewalt is seriously impressive if it is more powerful than the IR 2135. I have the Milwaukee 2763 and it is up there with the dewalt. If the dewalt is as good as the Milwaukee gun you will absolutely love it.

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I broke down and ordered it. I got Home Depot to match Amazon's promo.

I ordered the hog ring anvil as detent pins in some of the powerful impact require a more powerful tool to remove the dang socket.

. Congrats Ricky u my friend are a true Tool Junkie ;) let us know how u like it man!
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Yes it was Amazon $25 off $100, glad HD matched the price! You won't be disappointed congrats!

Bigmikez I almost bought into the redline just for that impact as well, I think real tool review tested these on a skidmore and they were on par with each other

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I broke down and ordered it. I got Home Depot to match Amazon's promo.

I ordered the hog ring anvil as detent pins in some of the powerful impact require a more powerful tool to remove the dang socket.

This sounds wrong.. But I like when you guys brake down and buy Dewalt;-)
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  • 2 weeks later...

Review from a guy on youtube shows this wrench puts out 1100 lbs of breakaway torque.  Simply amazing.  My question is why isn't there any impact wrenches that run off your 110 outlet with the same ratings? The best I've seen is dewalts dwf293 (292, 293, and 294) thats max is 345 ft lbs.

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Review from a guy on youtube shows this wrench puts out 1100 lbs of breakaway torque. Simply amazing. My question is why isn't there any impact wrenches that run off your 110 outlet with the same ratings? The best I've seen is dewalts dwf293 (292, 293, and 294) thats max is 345 ft lbs.

Not too sure exactly why, battery operated tools just seem to becoming more efficient with power and more powerful then a lot of corded tools. Most corded tools are still brushed motors where as many cordless have turned to brushless. We've seen a few Milwaukee fuel tools out perform their corded cousins i.e. Sawzall and sds max. Maybe the tool can harness the energy from the battery better than AC power, slightly over my head.

Jimbo

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Typically when they show cordless outperforming corded its against an old or cheap tool in a very specific application. Of course in some ranges of tools theres so much more refinement in the cordless tools that the best corded comparisons are junk. Pneumatic impact wrenches dominated so much that corded never developed, and non-cordless impact drivers are even rarer.

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Typically when they show cordless outperforming corded its against an old or cheap tool in a very specific application. Of course in some ranges of tools theres so much more refinement in the cordless tools that the best corded comparisons are junk. Pneumatic impact wrenches dominated so much that corded never developed, and non-cordless impact drivers are even rarer.

Yea that's true, demand for corded isn't for what it is cordless, but if you have a chance go to the Tia website, Dan uploaded a video of him on a m18 fuel sds max with 9.0 pack vs a corded model, not sure if stats, pretty cool vid though.

Jimbo

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To put it nicely, Milwaukee demonstrates their tools in niche applications where they perform best.  Every manufacturer does it and in a sense it's rigging the game, but marketing is paid to showcase their tools not give a honest comparison.  Having a hammer tailored to the application is particularly important with rotary hammers which is why there are so many sizes.

 

Let's go into some more detail on rotary hammers.  Each impact breaks up a little concrete across the tip of the bit and the rotation scrapes that and some other concrete away.  How much is broken at a given point on the tip is dependent on the impact energy per area of the bit tip. Of course this is not a linear function; there's a threshold under which you're not doing much, and one over which the marginal increase of chipping for an increase in impact energy drops off.  Ideally you get over the second threshold and stop wasting extra power, but then you go up a bit size and it's under-powered.  In addition to this, the chipped cement needs to be removed by the bit rotating, but for a large bit the average absolute speed of any given part of the bit is much higher for a given rotational speed is higher so larger bits can use a lower rotation speed.  A small bit may not have enough rotational speed to effectively clear chips and the hammering will re-hit what it has already broken and waste energy.  To top it all off, the angle modulation of impacts depends not only on the bit size, but the bit type.  Essentially each impact should maximize the time since a previous hit on nearby areas over the whole area on which it's hitting (The math is complicated enough even I don't want to calculate it).  For a large bit, the distance between the end of the carbide tip on impacts is going to be greater so the minimum angular spacing of hits needs to be closer.

 

This all combines to mean in masonry drilling, unlike wood or metal, speed depends on many things besides power.  It's quite possible that with less power that hammer won for a 1 inch hole, but that would probably be a different story for the max rated 1-9/16 inch hole.

 

That said, I would actually class the tools designed to use the 9Ah battery with 36V tools rather than 18V.  The 9Ah batteries seem to be Milwaukee's answer to Makita's 18X2 system, another way to get people into heavier tools without really leaving the 18V platform.  I believe milwaukee's 9Ah battery actually has more power than the ego 56V, 2Ah battery.

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To put it nicely, Milwaukee demonstrates their tools in niche applications where they perform best.  Every manufacturer does it and in a sense it's rigging the game, but marketing is paid to showcase their tools not give a honest comparison.  Having a hammer tailored to the application is particularly important with rotary hammers which is why there are so many sizes.

 

Let's go into some more detail on rotary hammers.  Each impact breaks up a little concrete across the tip of the bit and the rotation scrapes that and some other concrete away.  How much is broken at a given point on the tip is dependent on the impact energy per area of the bit tip. Of course this is not a linear function; there's a threshold under which you're not doing much, and one over which the marginal increase of chipping for an increase in impact energy drops off.  Ideally you get over the second threshold and stop wasting extra power, but then you go up a bit size and it's under-powered.  In addition to this, the chipped cement needs to be removed by the bit rotating, but for a large bit the average absolute speed of any given part of the bit is much higher for a given rotational speed is higher so larger bits can use a lower rotation speed.  A small bit may not have enough rotational speed to effectively clear chips and the hammering will re-hit what it has already broken and waste energy.  To top it all off, the angle modulation of impacts depends not only on the bit size, but the bit type.  Essentially each impact should maximize the time since a previous hit on nearby areas over the whole area on which it's hitting (The math is complicated enough even I don't want to calculate it).  For a large bit, the distance between the end of the carbide tip on impacts is going to be greater so the minimum angular spacing of hits needs to be closer.

 

This all combines to mean in masonry drilling, unlike wood or metal, speed depends on many things besides power.  It's quite possible that with less power that hammer won for a 1 inch hole, but that would probably be a different story for the max rated 1-9/16 inch hole.

 

That said, I would actually class the tools designed to use the 9Ah battery with 36V tools rather than 18V.  The 9Ah batteries seem to be Milwaukee's answer to Makita's 18X2 system, another way to get people into heavier tools without really leaving the 18V platform.  I believe milwaukee's 9Ah battery actually has more power than the ego 56V, 2Ah battery.

The volt wars seem to be like the bit wars if you were a kid during the 90's video game era. I have Greenworks 80v tools and they don't feel twice as powerful as ego 56v tools. I think what it really comes down to is the amps they can push through the packs is what really gives the tool its power.

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To put it nicely, Milwaukee demonstrates their tools in niche applications where they perform best. Every manufacturer does it and in a sense it's rigging the game, but marketing is paid to showcase their tools not give a honest comparison. Having a hammer tailored to the application is particularly important with rotary hammers which is why there are so many sizes.

Let's go into some more detail on rotary hammers. Each impact breaks up a little concrete across the tip of the bit and the rotation scrapes that and some other concrete away. How much is broken at a given point on the tip is dependent on the impact energy per area of the bit tip. Of course this is not a linear function; there's a threshold under which you're not doing much, and one over which the marginal increase of chipping for an increase in impact energy drops off. Ideally you get over the second threshold and stop wasting extra power, but then you go up a bit size and it's under-powered. In addition to this, the chipped cement needs to be removed by the bit rotating, but for a large bit the average absolute speed of any given part of the bit is much higher for a given rotational speed is higher so larger bits can use a lower rotation speed. A small bit may not have enough rotational speed to effectively clear chips and the hammering will re-hit what it has already broken and waste energy. To top it all off, the angle modulation of impacts depends not only on the bit size, but the bit type. Essentially each impact should maximize the time since a previous hit on nearby areas over the whole area on which it's hitting (The math is complicated enough even I don't want to calculate it). For a large bit, the distance between the end of the carbide tip on impacts is going to be greater so the minimum angular spacing of hits needs to be closer.

This all combines to mean in masonry drilling, unlike wood or metal, speed depends on many things besides power. It's quite possible that with less power that hammer won for a 1 inch hole, but that would probably be a different story for the max rated 1-9/16 inch hole.

That said, I would actually class the tools designed to use the 9Ah battery with 36V tools rather than 18V. The 9Ah batteries seem to be Milwaukee's answer to Makita's 18X2 system, another way to get people into heavier tools without really leaving the 18V platform. I believe milwaukee's 9Ah battery actually has more power than the ego 56V, 2Ah battery.

That's some pretty heavy stuff but I get what your saying, if I'm not mistaken rotary hammers should have lower rpms?

Jimbo

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