Jump to content

Mmm. Huh ?


Framer joe

Recommended Posts

I believe you are correct. The difference is the old Bluetooth lockout batteries and the new tool connect ones. I used to have a few of the Bluetooth batteries before because they sometimes go on clearance for next to nothing and I doubt they are the same electronics as the tool connect, but I have been wrong before. It might just be a sticker and a name change.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are asking about identification of the batteries, the top picture with the logo in the blue rectangle is the Bluetooth logo. The bottom left picture has the small logo on the left side of the battery with 3 one quarter arcs is DeWALT's Tool Connect logo. Their numbering system is reasonably understandable. Reading DCB205BT-2, DC is for DeWALT Cordless, the B is for Battery, 20 (12, 40 and 60 are also used is for voltage), the 5 position is the Amp/Hrs and is where it gets a little arbitrary,  for the 20 V MAX line a 0 is 3.0, a 1 is 1.5, a 3 is 2.0, a 4 is 4.0, a 5 is 5.0 and a 6 is 6.0. The BT is for Bluetooth, a normal battery has nothing there and the -2 means it is a 2 pack of batteries. I am going to guess that eventually all the Bluetooth batteries and the tools with Tool Connect will end up wearing the Tool Connect logo. This time around it appears that DeWALT will have a tool connect adapter, to allow changes to tools you already have, available more quickly than the 18V XRP/ 20V MAX adapter. Maybe they learned from that mess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ya  to me it’s just weird they make the new “5ah bt “ label look like the the newish 6ah label non bt....except for the little blue symbol. You’d figure a completely new label would be in order emphasizing the tool connect ability...as in a easy to spot label differentiating it from all others.....

        ....but what do I know....thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, framer said:

i just dont understand the point of bluetooth on batteries and tools.  

coolness factor, repetitive tasks, and maybe some cost savings? I would think in the case of the one key recip saw that it would save a guy cutting metal pipe all day money by determining the most efficient settings to cut the metal to extend blade life and reduce time it takes to cut the metal.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty much the only justification I hear for the one-key sawzall is metal cutting. We don't need Bluetooth, just put some preset modes on recip saws like with impact drivers. Just keep it simple. 

 

Bluetooth on tools is a solution looking for a problem. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Member Statistics

    16,551
    Total Members
    6,555
    Most Online
    sandust
    Newest Member
    sandust
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...