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Makita & Milwaukee Brushless Circular Saws Comparison


dwain

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Cracking job mates!! :) man its so fun to listen to you guys talk.. makes us Americans sound so boring..

Definitely two great saws.. as with a lot of power tools now the proformance gap is closing so much as manufacturers are pumping max power into these tools that there isn't a clear better tool..

it is more likely that people are gonna choose the saw that fits into their existing battery platform or if they don't already have a cordless platform (hard to imagine one of these saws would be their first tool in a line) that they would choose the brand that had the most other tools in the line that they would eventually want to buy.

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Cracking job mates!! :) man its so fun to listen to you guys talk.. makes us Americans sound so boring..

Definitely two great saws.. as with a lot of power tools now the proformance gap is closing so much as manufacturers are pumping max power into these tools that there isn't a clear better tool..

it is more likely that people are gonna choose the saw that fits into their existing battery platform or if they don't already have a cordless platform (hard to imagine one of these saws would be their first tool in a line) that they would choose the brand that had the most other tools in the line that they would eventually want to buy.

The Market has matured to the point where its really hard to justify switching to another brand unless their tool is that much better or they don't offer that tool for some reason.

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Another great review from the Ozzies again. The thing that really causes the biggest mental trip up in your reviews is the Metric system. It's just not used at all here on building trades. Other trades yes but if your building a house everything is imperial measurements.

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Another great review from the Ozzies again. The thing that really causes the biggest mental trip up in your reviews is the Metric system. It's just not used at all here on building trades. Other trades yes but if your building a house everything is imperial measurements.

 

Thanks DR. i can see how that would throw the yanks a bit. but if w're honest, Imperial is very outdated. The framing lumber sizes you refer to as 2"x4" etc, are not in reality even close to those sizes, so are very innacurate descriptions.

 

What I'm saying is that I'm happy to include the Imperial conversions etc in my write-ups, but I can't see us referencing Imperial measurements in our videos. I love this forum, and appreciate the huge support you guys give, but if its a roadblock for some Yanks, we can't do much else  about it.

 

Wow Dwain, awesome comparison you guys did! Both are sweet machines to be sure!

 

Thanks Chris! (and all)

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I get what your saying its just the terminology everyone uses here. The only place you can buy a real 2x4 is at the Amish sawmills. I can generally get a good idea of what your cutting or drilling from the video. Saying two systems would be redundant in the videos. I need like a cheat sheet when I'm watching the videos that's all :)

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indeed it was an interesting read!

 

I'm fairly capable of doing a pretty quick (and dirty) conversion in my head between metric and imperial for timber sizes, are you guys used to something similar? or is metric such a foreign idea that its not needed by your average builder?

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indeed it was an interesting read!

I'm fairly capable of doing a pretty quick (and dirty) conversion in my head between metric and imperial for timber sizes, are you guys used to something similar? or is metric such a foreign idea that its not needed by your average builder?

I remember working on an Armani store. All of the blueprints were in metric. It was tough doing the conversions to imperial for our tape measures at first. Some of us had to get metric tapes to make the job smoother.

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It definitely isn't needed at all for building here.. guys that use it do so voluntarily and are far and few between probably almost never on a construction site (except for Armani haha) but maybe a few in small cabinet shops...

after a few years of working with festool I have a pretty good understanding of smaller measurements

Guys, just for rough conversions round it to 25mm=1"

1",2",3",4",5",6" = 25,50,75,100,125,150 respectively

1/4 is about 6mm

3/8 is about 9mm

1/2" is about 13mm

3/4 is about 19mm

With all this you can guess that the 23mm chip board they were cutting must be close to 7/8"

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Good work NER :)

 

Yeah we didn't have any 3/4" /19mm flooring stock at hand, so used 23mm. which is a little over 7/8". It wasn't common stock, but if you're used to working in metric you don't have to try to work out the nearest 1/8, 1/16 or 1/32 measurement. You just say 23mm and people will know how thick it is :)

 

EDIT: The majority of measuring tapes over here have metric on one side and imperial on the other, which helps a bit. But many are starting to drop the imperial altogether.

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