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Truth or fiction about Milwaukee batteries


Petro0311

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All the older lithium cells didn't like extreme cold but the new red lithium and newer batteries do ok in the cold. The tools might be a little sluggish though for the first few seconds, but for the most part that's a no issue with lithium batteries now.

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where we live we experience many days with sub zero temps during the winter, I wouldn't want to use any tool with batteries in that kind of weather. I especially would never leave them outside overnight......

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Lithium cells deteriorate faster in the heat and for longer life being kept cool is recommended

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By "in the heat," I meant the heated part of the house as opposed to in the garage or in the back of the jeep, both of which routinely get below freezing in the winter. I've heard that freezing isn't really a good condition for battery storage, but of course that's just anecdotal.

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All types of batteries have a constant decrease in capacity with temperature. It won't last as long at 60 degrees as it will at 70, but you wouldn't notice. At 0 it will be much less, but not as much with LiIon as with alkaline or NiMH. Milwaukee is probably using the same cells as everyone else, so expect cold performance to be on par with commercially available 18650 LiIon cells. They're usually made by Panasonic, Samsung, LG, Sanyo, Sony, etc.

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  • 1 month later...

Lithium-ion cells will:

1. Always deteriorate, but the rate is highly dependant on the charge and the temperature of it. Around 50 % charge is the best, and room temperarature, and then you would need to charge them once in a while, since the charge will drop a little bit in storage. But of course, this is not very practical. But then again, life span is very high like this. So not any problem at all to lower it a bit. By for example always charge the batteries 100 %. 

2. If you use the batteries in the cold, or overheat them very often, you would drain the life quicker (in an exponential maner). But even so, the automatics in the batteries usually protect themselves to do any very high damages to them. 

3. Would hold a lesser charge at low temperatures, so your batteries will have a lesser working capacity at low temps. Especially sub-zero. So you could actually get more of the charge if you use some of the power to heat them up a little bit. Just like Tesla's batteries in the Winter-pack.

 

I don't know about milwaukee, but the Makita charger don't want to charge the batteries at too low temps or high. Becouse it would drain the lifespan too much. And people would get angry.

 

Good thing is, cold batteries will heat up quickly at low temps. So you just have to work quick. ;)

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